Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Saint Paul in Britain Paperback – June, 1984

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.95 $5.95

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Artisan Publishers (June 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0934666121
  • ISBN-13: 978-0934666121
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,053,510 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
R.W. Morgan's "St. Paul in Britain" is a treasure trove of rare and provocative research into the early Church in Britain. Although the book's title suggests it's primarily about the question of whether or not St. Paul ever went to Britain, the book covers many details about the early Church in Britain that are difficult to find elsewhere. Because of the importance of Morgan's claims and the rarity of the research he presents, his book is a very valuable one, especially to students of Church history or of Anglicanism.

Some of the more provocative claims that Morgan substantiates through some painstaking research are that 1) Joseph of Arimathea went to and stayed in Britain c. AD 38 2) Aristobulus (mentioned in the Bible) also went to Britain 3) Prudens married Claudia, the daughter of British royalty and the palace of Prudens and Claudia was probably where Paul stayed in Britain 4) St. Paul himself made it to Britain.

The importance of these claims is that the evidence strongly suggests that an apostolic church was planted in Britain in the first century independently of the Roman Church. This apostolic church grew and prospered not just because of the apostolic origins but also because it was suited to make inroads into Druidism in a way in which Roman culture and religion never could. This has implications for how to read the history of Christianity in Anglicanism and helps explain the nature and development of the English Church in subsequent history.

I bought this book because it seemed to be the basis for much of Andrew Gray's research in his book "The Origins and Early History of Christianity in Britain." The historian in me wants to know if Morgan and Gray's claims have been substantiated more recently (Morgan originally published his work in 1860). However, it seems as if Morgan has plenty of evidence to support most of his claims, evidence that is unlikely to be overturned in the future.
3 Comments 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Did Paul go to Britain? We don't know. We do know he talked of going to Spain, but if he did, nothing has been found written. It is believed that not all Paul wrote, or was wrote about him, survived. So did some British trip allude us? Perhaps. This reprint, dense at times, recounts the history of early Christianity of Britain. It first lays the foundation by looking at the Druid era and then the Romans which leads us into the age of interest. The evidence for Paul there is circumstantial and not entirely clear, but much has been garbled with time, at least some tidbits of truth probably remain. Morgan did manage to collect many old sources - yes, watch for the occasional British-centric pontificating in this and similar books. It would be great if a modern study was done.See also Glastonbury: Isle of Avalon, Missing Years of Jesus, The Holy Kingdom & The Isle of Avalon.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have thought for years that Paul and his companions either established or ministered to the church established in Britain in the first century. Morgan presents evidence of this. But he also brings in some interesting history of Druidism, which appears to be the religion that began in Babylon under Nimrod.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While listening to an online audio this writer was quoted so I chose to see the details. While covering the time of the very early years of Christianity it mentions no where near as much of what the title implies. Morgan tend to repeat himself and quotes the same thing that Paul went to the islands but gives little of what happened. He does bring to light the cooperation and friendship with the Druids who actually became the first Christian bishops. He also speaks extensively about the inhabitants and the many battles they were successful in trouncing the Roman invaders. He points out that England was not conquered by Rome but rather lived under treaty allowing the natives complete autonomy which helped the early church to thrive there. But he repeats the same points far too much and while there is a bit of new information not found elsewhere it is not in the same ball park as "Celt,Druid, & Culdee" by Isabel Hill Elder
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
“St Paul in Britain; or, The origin of British as Opposed to Papal Christianity” is a peculiar text, first published in 1861. It's apparently used as a kind of quasi-sacred text by small groups of Neo-Celtic Christians. The author, Richard Williams Morgan (1815-1889) was a controversial Welsh clergyman. He is also known as Mor Meirion and Mar Pelagius. Morgan eventually left the Church of England and became First Patriarch of the Ancient British Church, a small group which still exists under a new designation, the Celtic Orthodox Church. It has no official connection to Eastern or Oriental Orthodoxy.

Morgan's text is an extended piece of “alternative history”. One of its central claims is that Britain and the Celts were evangelized by Joseph of Arimathea before the Church at Rome even existed. Britain thus got its Christianity directly from Jerusalem and the original apostles, without a Romish detour. Just a few years later, Paul baptized a Silurian royal family held captive in Rome. The first royalty won to Christianity were therefore British, making the British royal throne authentically Christian with precedence over the papacy. It also means that the monarch has a certain jurisdiction over the Church. In Morgan's version of events, Constantine the Great and his mother Helena were Celtic, which means that the Roman Empire was converted by another group of British royals. The nationalist and anti-Catholic character of these arguments is patently obvious. What's more strange is that Morgan, who seems to have been something of a Welsh nationalist firebrand, spins arguments which could also be used by *English* nationalists or UK imperialists!
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: church history, world history