Buy Used
$5.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Murfie, Inc.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Used, very good condition! Fast Shipping. Amazon Prime Eligible!
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.40
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The Salesman and Bernadette

4.5 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, November 10, 1998
"Please retry"
$8.96 $0.39

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

The Salesman and Bernadette is a three-dimensional album, as bold as it is lonely. For this release, Chesnutt enlisted the backing talents of the 12-piece band Lambchop, who are no strangers to the country and soul that Salesman peddles. The songs weave into one another, bouncing from Motown to Merle Haggard to Van Morrison. The result sounds like a copy of Pet Sounds storming out of the house and drinking until it cries; the playing and production have to be heard to be believed. Wisely, Chesnutt withholds the money shot until Salesman's last two songs; "Square Room" is an astral take on the aching laments of George Jones, and "Old Hotel" is a midnight sulk into slippery samples and husky growling. It's not a disc that's easily appreciated on the first listen, but a few patient spins unravel something opaque yet shiny as hell. --Jason Josephes
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
3:13
Play in Library $0.99
 
2
30
3:40
Play in Library $0.99
 
3
30
4:20
Play in Library $0.99
 
4
30
3:01
Play in Library $0.99
 
5
30
3:38
Play in Library $0.99
 
6
30
2:52
Play in Library $0.99
 
7
30
5:42
Play in Library $0.99
 
8
30
4:07
Play in Library $0.99
 
9
30
3:08
Play in Library $0.99
 
10
30
3:51
Play in Library $0.99
 
11
30
7:02
Play in Library $0.99
 
12
30
1:25
Play in Library $0.99
 
13
30
4:28
Play in Library $0.99
 
14
30
4:20
Play in Library $0.99
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 10, 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Capricorn / Umgd
  • ASIN: B00000DLVY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #260,729 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Vic Chesnutt Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
An astonishing album - beautiful musicianship courtesy of Lambchop coupled with top-of-form Chestnutt means that this is music with longetivity written all over it. Vic can die happy - he's now recorded a certifiable masterpiece. I don't think I'll ever tire of it.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Athens, GA is one of those southern artsy/fartsy cities that is a creative well of talent. It has that art house aura that draws attention from, but still protects against, the guardians of morals that inhabit the bible belt that runs through the south and the midwest. Vic Chestnut might have ended up as a wheelchair bound, bible thumper spouting hellfire and brimstone, but instead we get a man who can play a convincing role as a contemplative drunk that can pen a damn good song.
The Salesman and Bernadette is Vic Chestnut's sixth album. Lambchop is the backing band on this album. The collaboration is similar to the one Chestnut did on the album Nine High a Pallet, which involved Chestnut and members of the bands Widespread Panic and Cracker. Lambchop is an indie band out of Nashville that plays everything from country to the avant-garde.If you are familiar with Vic Chestnut's other work then I can say this is one of his more upbeat albums. If you're not familiar with Chestnut's work let me just say it is a somber album with upbeat moments. Think Faulkner... Tennessee Williams... Lush greenery thriving in humidity under weeping willows. Think of plantations past their prime and southern cities grappling with their heritage and changing times. Think bourbon and the occasional Valium.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I recently came back to this release and though I always liked it, I'm now tempted to laud it as Vic's best. OK, I won't go that far because in a few months I'll be back into North Star Deserter or Is the Actor Happy? or one of the other brilliant releases -- but this one has such varied greatness within a cohesive whole that I'm going to have to go back to my Top 20 for 1998 list and reposition this one at or near the top. Besides his own southern Flannery O'Connor/William Faulkner-esque insights, he's created an atmospheric texture along with Kurt Wagner of Lambchop fame in the production. There are horns, whispy percussives, vibes and even Emmylou Harris thrown into the mix along with Vic's wide range of singing here. Vic goes from highly melodic to Southern drawl to story telling to mumbling and it all works.

The only negative I might say is that there are a couple tracks that serve more as glue than great songs in and of themselves but the album kind of needs that to give the listener a slight respite between the gold stars. I don't know if Tom Waits has ever listened to much of Vic's stuff but I have a feeling if he heard this one walking by somebody's apartment building, he just might kneel down and kiss the ground.

Without going through all the tracks here I'll just touch on the last two. Square Room is as fragile and fierce as anything Vic ever put to tape and Old Hotel kind of wraps the dark tones of the whole album up with a grinning twinkle at his own plight -- it's the kind of song and spirit that must have kept Vic going all those years under the heavy weight of paralysis, alcoholism and general lack of hope. Nevertheless, this album is an affirmation of expression that only someone who is in touch with a higher power could have made. Thanks Vic!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Somewhere between Woody Guthrie, Victoria Williams, and R.E.M. sits Vic Chestnutt in his wheelchair, making some of the most unique folk I've ever heard. This original and literate 'concept' album grows on you with each listen, until Vic's sitting there in your living room strumming a guitar. Nearly every song's a mini-masterpiece, but I love "Parade"...it builds and builds until Vic's nearly rising out of his chair with the intensity of emotion.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I discovered this cd at my local library 3 years ago. I remember it stood out on the shelves with its title that reminded me of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman" and its interesting cover art. I thought it was worth a shot but didn't believe it would prove to be any good because I had never heard of Vic Chesnutt before, plus as you probably already know, there's tons of crap in the music section of public libraries all across the country. Well, I was wrong about this cd. "The Salesman and Bernadette" is a gem, truly a rare find. Let's see if I can explain the sound: It's kind of folk, early blues (like Bessie Smith early), a bit Mazzy Star-ish in mood; for the most part (though there are other musical accompaniments), it's the sound of one man and his guitar on a cold night with a bottle of booze on the table nearby drowning his sorrows in song and solitude, slurring the words every now and then with the guitar chords running into each other -though there are often moments when the sound is so clear that I swear you can hear into Vic Chesnutt's soul and the stars too. This is a very personal-sounding album, like any of Elliott Smith's, and with the vocal expressivity of early blues records but with a very contemporary sound: a good analogy would be, Vic Chesnutt is to Blues as Amy Winehouse is to jazz: Definitely unique. You won't find another artist like Vic Chesnutt and if you've never heard of him before (and you like Mazzy Star, Elliott Smith, old blues records and you're tired of hearing all that crap that comes out of the radio, then I suggest you start with this album. This is my favorite from Vic Chesnutt and I love every song, especially "Square Room," "Maiden" and "Bernadette and Her Crowd." This is the kind of album that you listen to when you're by yourself at home, writing, drawing or painting or just sitting back and sorting through the turmoil of your own life. This is not car music.
3 Comments One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?