This title is not currently available for purchase
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen by [Torday, Paul]
Kindle App Ad

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 218 customer reviews

See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle

Length: 356 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Save on all things Kindle
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

British businessman and dedicated angler Paul Torday has found a way to combine a novel about fishing and all that it means with a satire involving politics, bureaucrats, the Middle East, the war in Iraq, and a sheikh who is really a mystic. Torday makes it all work in a most convincing way using memos, interviews, e-mails, and letters in clever juxtaposition.

Dr. Alfred Jones is a fisheries scientist in Great Britain who is called upon to find a way to introduce salmon into the desert in Yemen. The Yemeni sheikh will spare no expense to see this happen. He says:

It would be a miracle of God if it happened. I know it... If God wills it, the summer rains will fill the wadis... and the salmon will run the river. And then my countrymen... all classes and manner of men--will stand side by side and fish for the salmon. And their natures, too, will be changed. They will feel the enchantment of this silver fish... and then when talk turns to what this tribe said or that tribe did... then someone will say, "Let us arise, and go fishing."

Such is the sheikh's vision. He tells Alfred: "Without faith, there is no hope. Without faith, there is no love." Alfred has no religious faith and has been mired in a loveless marriage for twenty years, so these words seem fantastic to him.

Alfred and Sheikh Muhammad connect immediately through their mutual love of fishing, despite Alfred's misgivings about the viability of the project. The Prime Minister's flack man tells Alfred that he must persevere and succeed because Great Britain needs some positive connection to the Middle East, something other than a failing, flailing war. These kinds of political alliances are always shaky at best, and when things start to go sideways, allies have a way of disappearing. Alfred soldiers on, with the help of the lovely Harriet, Sheikh Muhammad's land agent, and the project is readied for opening day, when the Sheikh and the Prime Minister will have a 20-minute photo op.

All of the faith and good will in the world cannot overcome the forces ranged against them, bringing tragedy to everyone involved. Despite all, Alfred's interior life is changed immeasurably. He says in the end: "I believe in it, because it is impossible." --Valerie Ryan

From Publishers Weekly

In Torday's winningly absurdist debut, Dr. Alfred Jones feels at odds with his orderly life as a London fisheries scientist and husband to the career-driven Mary, with whom he shares a coldly dispassionate relationship. Just as Mary departs for a protracted assignment in Geneva, Alfred gets consulted on a visionary sheik's scheme to introduce salmon, and salmon-angling, to the country of Yemen. Alfred is deeply skeptical (salmon are cold-water fish that spawn in fresh water; Yemen is hot and largely desert), but the project gains traction when Peter Maxwell, the prime minister's director of communications, seizes on it as a PR antidote to negative press related to the Iraq war. Alfred is pressed by his superiors to meet with the sheik's real estate rep, the glamorous young Harriet, and embarks on a yearlong journey to realize the sheik's vision of spiritual peace through fly-fishing for the people of Yemen. British businessman and angler Torday captures Alfred's emerging humanity, Maxwell's antic solipsism, Mary's calculating neediness and Harriet's vulnerability, presenting their voices through diaries, e-mails, letters and official interviews conducted after the doomed venture's surprisingly tragic outcome. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product details

  • File Size: 2327 KB
  • Print Length: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (September 18, 2008)
  • Publication Date: September 18, 2008
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002U3CCBK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #320,315 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer reviews

Rated by customers interested in
Literary Fiction
4.1 out of 5 stars
4.1 out of 5 stars
Religion & Spirituality Books
3.7 out of 5 stars
3.7 out of 5 stars
Thriller Books
3.6 out of 5 stars
3.6 out of 5 stars

Top customer reviews

November 29, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
August 19, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
August 14, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
June 30, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
December 24, 2016
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
November 26, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews