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Savage Century: Back to Barbarism

3.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
ISBN-13: 978-0870032325
ISBN-10: 0870032321
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Thérèse Delpech, one of France's foremost thinkers on international security, has dared what historians no longer attempt: a grand sweep through 20th century European history as prelude to an equally brilliant analysis of the grave, even existential challenges facing the West today." —Josef Joffe, Publisher-Editor, Die Zeit



" Savage Century is a book of passion and reason: a bold study of the sources of global political savagery, and a fierce argument against repeating the mistakes that have led to our dire straits." —Peter Brooks, Sterling Professor of Comparative Literature, Yale University

Review

" Savage Century is a book of passion and reason: a bold study of the sources of global political savagery, and a fierce argument against repeating the mistakes that have led to our dire straits." -Peter Brooks, Sterling Professor of Comparative Literature, Yale University

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Carnegie Endowment for Int'l Peace (October 10, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0870032321
  • ISBN-13: 978-0870032325
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.5 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,531,661 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By B. Case TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
"Savage Century: Back to Barbarism," by Thérèse Delpech, poses the question: What are the worldwide political parallels between 1905 and 2005, and do these similarities suggest that we are, once again, dangerously close to another period of savage world wars? The author makes a convincing argument that the answer is yes.

Thérèse Delpech is director for strategic studies at the Atomic Energy Commission of France and French Commissioner at the UN for the disarmament of Iraq. The original French version of the book, "L'Ensauvagement," won the prestigious 2005 Prix Femina de L'essai. This English translation missed getting a four-star rating from me because I found it frequently very difficult to understand. On just about every page there were sentences that I needed to read over and over again trying to decipher what the author meant, and for many other sentences I was never able to comprehend what the author was trying to convey. I assumed that the problem was the translator, not the author.

I found many of her parallels between 1905 and 2005 eloquent and arresting, but it was toward the end of the book when she was discussing possible political futures for the year 2025 that my interest really piqued. Among many other predictions for 2025, the author suggests these two that I found particularly alarming: 1) the disintegration of Pakistan; 2) a significantly stronger and self-confident India in a military conflict with an economically and socially weakened China--an India that would have no trouble destroying the Chinese fleet in the Strait of Malacca.

Delpech's point of view is decidedly European. As an American, I found it interesting to expose myself to this different perspective on past, present, and future world affairs.
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