Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Saving Ben: A Father's Story of Autism (Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series) First Edition Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1574412697
ISBN-10: 1574412698
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$4.43 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$7.52 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
24 New from $1.99 35 Used from $0.01 2 Collectible from $9.85
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$7.52 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

Saving Ben is a haunting tale, so powerfully told that readers will find it practically crawls under their skin as they flip the pages.”—George Getschow, writer-in-residence of the Mayborn Conference, University of North Texas



 "Saving Ben is a wonderful read that will make parents look at their own children, disabled or not, and find so much to cherish.” J. N. -  PEOPLE Magazine, September 14, 2009



 "Saving Ben is a haunting tale, so powerfully told that readers will find it practically crawls under their skin as they flip the pages."—George Getschow, writer-in-residence of the Mayborn Conference, University of North Texas
(George Getschow writer-in-residence of the Mayborn Conference, University of North Texas)

About the Author

DAN E. BURNS, Ph.D., graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1979 and taught English at Southern Methodist University, University of Texas at Arlington, and University of Phoenix, publishing in numerous scholarly journals. In 1990 his third child, Benjamin, was diagnosed with autism. Dan helped organize a Dallas chapter of Families for Early Autism Treatment, a support group for parents, and pioneered educational and medical interventions. He lives in Dallas, Texas.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: University of North Texas Press; First Edition edition (August 3, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1574412698
  • ISBN-13: 978-1574412697
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,137,597 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By S. Jaskiewicz on September 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Among parents of children with autism, in whatever form, there is a cliché: "If you have seen one child with autism, you have seen one child with autism." Its appearance and therapies will differ so much from child to child, that it is impossible to generalize from something that worked for one family to have confidence that it will work for you. Every child is different, and requires individualized care.

I mention that background because my own experience as the parent of a child with autism has been very different from what Dan Burns describes so eloquently in Saving Ben. Nonetheless, the challenges he and his family faced were very familiar from my own life, and that of my family:

* Overcoming low expectations from teachers, despite a parent's belief in his child's abilities, and desire to give the child real challenges and goals at school.

* Different perspectives between the child's father and mother (much less other relatives without the first hand experience of living with autism) on how aggressively to provide therapy, and the stresses that difference creates in the family.

* Confusion about the appropriate therapies, when each doctor and/or therapist recommends something different, often at great cost, with no immediate "ah-ha" moment revealing what works (or does not). For me, this was especially true when my son was first diagnosed, and I did not know enough to filter the real from the charlatans.

* Constant disruption of plans, from the short term to career goals.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Saving Ben isn't your typical story about a child with autism. Ben's father is very open and honest in his story about how his family deals with with an autistic child. Their lives seem to spin out of control at times. Ben's mom, Sue, has recalled through therapy that she was abused as a child, and has developed her own mental problems in order to deal with that. Their marriage breaks up as a result the fact that the author is gay. Combine that with job losses, eviction from his home at one point, and Ben's now out-of-control condition and you have a situation that would cause most people to just give up. When Ben was diagnosed at three years, even the doctor told him to, "Take him home, love him, and save your money for his institutionalization when he turns twenty-one."

But Dan Burns didn't give up. He read everything he could find on autism and talked to doctors across the country, weighing the different opinions and treatment options for his son and the all-too-few alternative approaches available. He enrolled him in different schools and fought with the local school system for a proper and relevant education for his son in which he could actually learn something. He was finally able to secure 40 hour per week conditioning classes that slowly but surely produced results. It seems like the schools don't know how to teach these kids and with all the other life disruptions, not all of this happened right away, Ben was around seven when he finally got the type of training that worked for him.

Now, at 21, some of the worst aspects of the condition are in the past. Ben is still learning and working and improving. But he can take bike rides with his dad and can understand simple commands and maybe more than everyone realizes.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The author writes a poignant, well-written account of his life as a gay man, married and the father of an autistic child. When told by doctors to save his money to pay for institutional care down the road, the fighter dad begins his war with the disease and with prejudice. He studies and learns all he can. He fights for his son's life. This is not a sweet story. It's written the way life is --- messy.

The author not only finds his son but himself as well. Moreover, he discusses his wife and her experience with child abuse. He talks about dealing with the inordinate stress in this terrible situation.

It is wonderful to see this sort of deep father's love and to discover life through his very special eyes. This is a powerful, dynamic book and I highly recommend it.

- Susanna K. Hutcheson
1 Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved reading this book. It has helped me understand that parents, whether married or divorced, must do what is in the best interest of the autistic child/children. Parents must never try to alienate the child/children from the other parent because children need to spend time with both parents. This book illustrates that point beautifully!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A brilliantly-written book that takes the reader into the heart of what is faced by families with autistic children. Burns’s detailed, closely observed scenes make for a fast, page-turner of a memoir. As the father of a son similar to Ben, I can attest to the living, breathing truth of what is related here. Funny, touching, and heart-rending by turns, the book is impossible to put down after you’ve started reading it. It's more than an excellent way to learn about autism; it's also a fine literary memoir for anybody who likes literature. The scene presenting the author’s breathless search for Wacky Wild Kool-Aid is itself worth the price of the book. Unforgettable read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Saving Ben: A Father's Story of Autism (Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Saving Ben: A Father's Story of Autism (Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Series)