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The Science of Consciousness 1st Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0814729809
ISBN-10: 0415110823
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Editorial Reviews

Review

The book presents the reader with a series of clearly written chapters that deal with crucial and often difficult questions with clarity and in an engaging form which at the same time do not sacrifice rigour ... I hope to come across more books of this sort, which are capable of transmitting enthusiasm for psychology both as a searching evidence based discipline and one that will engage with important questions -- Psychology Teaching Review

There's ever delight in praise and this book deserves a lot of praise. Velmans has assembled a constellation of luminaries, many of them professors of psychology, who have given us one of the best available surveys of contemporary, scientific mainstream thinking about consciousness.(Journal of Consciousness Studies, 3(5/6), 1996) -- (Journal of Consciousness Studies, 3(5/6), 1996) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Max Velmans is currently a Reader in Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has around 50 publications on consciousness including two new books: "Understanding Consciousness" (Routledge, April 2000) and the edited "Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness" (John Benjamins, October 2000). He is a frequent speaker at international conferences in this area and has developed a course on "The Psychology of Consciousness" for over 20 years. Further details, on-line papers etc., available at http://www.goldsmiths.ac.uk/academic/ps/velmans.htm --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (May 16, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415110823
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814729809
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,659,803 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Roger I. Camara Lemarroy on July 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is a good collection of papers on the science of consciousness. Anyone interested on the field, or someone familiar with it, will find nothing terribly new, except perhaps the clinical papers, those dealing with the placebo effect and somatic consequences of consciousness. This would be a much better introductory text than an original contribution in general.
The introduction is about average. Papers on perception without awareness and consciousness in relation to memory and learning are quite good. Bernard Baars presents his cognitive theory of consciousness again. Then are the two really good papers, the jewels, one by Libet discussing neural correlates of consicousness, and a review of neuropsychology and dissociation in consciousness by A. Young, one of the best yet. Then there are the before mentioned papers on clinical matters, the often ignored section in consciousness studies. Max Velmans writes some philosophy of consciousness, and proposes a reflexive model, which I think was a little confusing, for mixing up phenomenology and objectivity. For example, for him pain is in the finger that hurts, not in the brain. But he admits the correlates and presumably mechanisms of pain are in the brain. He holds that pain is in the finger that hurts in a strange pseudo-phenomenological sense.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a good collection of papers on the science of consciousness. Anyone interested on the field, or someone familiar with it, will find nothing terribly new, except perhaps the clinical papers, those dealing with the placebo effect and somatic consequences of consciousness. This would be a much better introductory text than an original contribution in general.
The introduction is about average. Papers on perception without awareness and consciousness in relation to memory and learning are quite good. Bernard Baars presents his cognitive theory of consciousness again. Then are the two really good papers, the jewels, one by Libet discussing neural correlates of consicousness, and a review of neuropsychology and dissociation in consciousness by A. Young, one of the best yet. Then there are the before mentioned papers on clinical matters, the often ignored section in consciousness studies. Max Velmans writes some philosophy of consciousness, and proposes a reflexive model, which I think was a little confusing, for mixing up phenomenology and objectivity. For example, for him pain is in the finger that hurts, not in the brain. But he admits the correlates and presumably mechanisms of pain are in the brain. He holds that pain is in the finger that hurts in a strange pseudo-phenomenological sense.
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