The Scientific American Brave New Brain: How Neuroscience, Brain-Machine Interfaces, Neuroimaging, Psychopharmacology, Epigenetics, the Internet, and Our ... and Enhancing the Future of Mental Power Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0470376249
ISBN-10: 0470376244
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you'll explore:
  • How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are helping the deaf hear, the blind see, and the paralyzed communicate.
  • How our brains can repair and improve themselves, erase traumatic memories
  • How we can stay mentally alert longer—and how we may be able to halt or even reverse Alzheimers
  • How we can control technology with brain waves, including prosthetic devices, machinery, computers—and even spaceships or clones.
  • Insights into how science may cure fatal diseases, and improve our intellectual and physical productivity

Judith Horstman presents a highly informative and entertaining look at the future of your brain, based on articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, and the work of today’s visionary neuroscientists.

Top Seven Predictions for the Future of the Brain
Amazon-exclusive content from author Judith Horstman

1) Wi-Fi Everything
Microchips in or on your brain will enhance memory, store data, and connect wirelessly to the internet, eliminating your cell phone and allowing you to control machines or even clones via mental wi-fi. See Chapter 7: Your Bionic Brain.

2) Cures for Dementia
Advances in neuroscience and bioengineering will render Alzheimer's, some brain damage, depression and perhaps even mental retardation largely preventable, curable and possibly reversible for many. See Chapter 3: Manipulating Your Memory.

3) Better Brain Power
Neuroenhancers - from smart pills to implants and devices––will improve thinking, enhance creativity, relieve depression, erase traumatic memories and boost mental endurance. See Chapter 2: Boosting Your Brain Power.

4) Bionic Brain Parts
Merging humans and machines with bionic or biological spare parts that already restore hearing and give sight to the blind could restore movement and speech to the paralyzed––and give super powers to the healthy. See Chapter 7: Your Bionic Brain.

5) Mind-Reading Brain Scans
Neuroimaging that now "reads" brains to detect disease will be able to accurately detect deception, antisocial tendencies, dangerous inclinations, your preference in sexual partners--and possibly predict your behavior. See Chapter 5: Looking Inside Your Brain.

6) Less Brain Surgery
Nanotechnology – the science of small – will be used to float drugs, chemicals and minuscule surgical instruments into your brain to treat tumors, clots and other traumas, and defective genes and cells will be able to be replaced. See Chapter 8: The Possible Dreams.

7) An Ethical Avalanche
The moral, legal and economic fallout from this amazing new technology will keep lawyers, lawmakers and the courts busy for decades dealing with issues of privacy, fairness, civil rights and even what it means to be human. See Chapter 9: Neuroethics; Facing the Dark Side.

From the Inside Flap

The Scientific American Brave New Brain offers a fast-forward look at what's in store for our brains in the very near future—a world where science fiction becomes science fact.

Lightning-quick advances in neuroscience are bringing amazing treatments and startling predictions of what we can expect to both better and boost our brains. This remarkable book reveals what lies ahead over the next few decades and what exists now in brain treatments with biochemistry, drugs, computers, electrical treatments, stem cells, brain chips, and gene manipulation—and the legal, ethical, and moral fallout of all this change and progress.

The Scientific American Brave New Brain explains how our brains make new neurons and what we have to do to keep them, tells how our very thoughts and feelings can change our brains and our genes, and introduces the tremendous promises of nanomedicine—the science of the unimaginably small.

Today, brain pacemakers control tremors and seizures; tomorrow, advances in biochemistry and bioengineering could make Alzheimer's, brain damage, and perhaps even mental retardation preventable, curable, and reversible. Microchips in the brain could enhance memory, restore mental functions, store data, and even control our cell phones.

Bionic or biological spare brain parts that now restore hearing and give sight to the blind could restore movement to the paralyzed—and give the healthy super powers. Brain surgery may be rare, thanks to nanomedicine, and brain scans will identify mental illness and brain disease before symptoms show, "read" minds, and predict and control behavior.

This comprehensive and entertaining look at the wonders in your brain's very near future is written and edited by Judith Horstman, based on the newest research and articles from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines.


Product Details

  • File Size: 2329 KB
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (February 25, 2010)
  • Publication Date: February 25, 2010
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003AU7E6U
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #954,830 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book is a nice overview of the latest trends in neuroscience. I have enjoyed reading the book, but it's really too short. The font is not huge, but each page could easily fit 1/3 more words. I attribute this to the latest unfortunate trend in publishing where I have noticed attempts to publish short stories, articles, essays and/or novellas as full books at full price. In most popular science books at this price, you will get more than double the amount of words and information. As a result, the topics are not covered at any great depth. Nevertheless, the information inside is enjoyable and entertaining to read.

208 pages? The actual text is only 142. They are including blank pages, introductory pages, index pages, glossary pages and nice color inserts in that total.
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Format: Hardcover
Horstman makes it easy to understand how the brain works, what it does and how we need to take of it. It is chock-filled with research, new technology and explanations that every health professional and lay person needs to know about the brain. This is a great read. I highly recommend it!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Scientific American Brave New Brain: How Neuroscience, Brain-Machine Interfaces, Neuroimaging, Psychopharmacology, Epigenetics, the Internet, and ... and Enhancing the Future of Mental Power by Judith Horstman

"The Scientific American Brave New Brain" is a book based on many brain science articles on how many advances in research and technology are changing our brains today and the future. Award-winning journalist, Judith Horstman takes the reader on a journey of brain science; what was yesterday's science fiction is today's science. This brief 208-page book is composed of the following ten chapters: 1. Your Changeable Brain, 2. Boosting Your Brain Power, 3. Manipulating Your Memory, 4. Digital You, 5. Looking Inside Your Brain The Magic of Neuroimaging, Rewiring the Brain Electric, 7. The Bionic Brain, 8. The Possible Dreams, 9. Neuroethics, and 10. The Past Is Prologue.

Positives:
1. Popular science book for the masses. Well-written and engaging.
2. Fascinating topic and articles to match.
3. Great overall format that provides readers with an appetizer of what to expect," in brief", and ends each chapter with a futuristic summary.
4. Great use of popular culture like sci-fi movies to convey scientific concepts.
5. Sets the right tone by providing a good refresher on how the brain works. An excellent overview of what we thought then, what we know now, and what we will know tomorrow.
6. This book really gets you up to date with all the latest findings regarding the brain; as an example neuroplasticity. Some of the research is breathtaking.
7. The impact of epigenetics...the changes in your genes.
8. The benefits of meditation and exercise to the brain. Six drug-free ways to boost your brain.
9.
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Format: Hardcover
The San Francisco Book Review wrote, "this book will amaze the reader," and I find that I have to agree. Anyone with even a passing interest in neuroscience will find Brave New Brain full of interesting and easily accessible information, sure to fascinate and amaze.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A fairly easy but very informative read on the frontiers of modern brain science. Written in a light, at times breezy, style, it is for the informed reader who wants an easily comprehended guide to the current frontiers of our quest to understand where we really live--within the confines of our brains.
The illustrations are excellent, and facilitate the grasping of the points made by the author in the text. She digresses to give quick basic summaries of DNA, etc., which are a nice refresher for those trained in the biological sciences, but perhaps a little rusty on new developments. Highly recommended, and very thought-provoking, especially as to the approaching train wreck when our rocketing train of brain science collides with our avaricious legal system, to what end none may yet know.
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Format: Hardcover
Oh, what a fun book this is! (Well, fun if you too are a brain nerd who just can't learn enough about the powers, puzzles, pitfalls, and potential of the human brain.)

The book covers a wide range of fascinating topics including: neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, epigenetics, improving brain power and memory, the effects of digital culture on brains, neuroimaging, rewiring the brain, the merging of brain and machines, stem cells, gene therapy, and nanotechnology, and neuroethics. Judith's writing is superb: she has quite the gift for conveying complex science concepts in a style that is both clear and captivating--and funny at times too. Her skillful writing allows for wrapping your brain around this information to be a simultaneously educational and entertaining experience.

A tour of brain science (past, present, and future) has never been so exhilarating. Enjoy the ride!
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Format: Hardcover
A Brief Look into the Future of the Brain

The Scientific American Brave New Brain offers a basic overview of what researchers have discovered about the human brain and how new discoveries regarding the brain may change how we operate in the future. Horstman briefly describes how we used to think about brain-related topics and then details what current research has done to rectify or expand our previous knowledge. She also introduces what may come about in the future based on the direction and progress we have made so far in understanding our own brains. The book is structured similar to a textbook with intruding excerpts scattered about, but does not present an excessive amount of information. Horstman does a good job of keeping the reader's attention through the use of common examples that relate to the topics being discussed. This review will cover the book's structure and briefly describe the topics discussed in the chapters of the book.

Structure

Before each chapter, Horstman provides both a succinct overview of the topic discussed in that chapter and a summarized timeline regarding how the topic has been, is, and may be regarded. The book consists of nine chapters, with each covering a different topic regarding the brain and discussing the findings and future of the topic. Each chapter starts off with a brief discussion on how many people relate to, regard, or are associated with the chapter's main topic in the present. From there, Horstman begins to delve into current research related to the topic that sheds light on where we are currently in our understanding of the topic. She then goes to discuss shortcomings of our understanding based on the current research presented in the previous section.
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