Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Usually ships within 1 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Secret Way to War: Th... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: qualifies for free prime shipping! may contain highlighting, underlining, or writing. may also contain light wear from use.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Secret Way to War: The Downing Street Memo and the Iraq War's Buried History (New York Review Books Collections) Paperback – April 4, 2006

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.95
$3.70 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$11.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Usually ships within 1 to 4 weeks. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Secret Way to War: The  Downing Street  Memo and the Iraq War's Buried History (New York Review Books Collections)
  • +
  • Now They Tell Us: The American Press and Iraq
Total price: $21.90
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"...a forceful analysis." --Mother Jones

"Danner...covers the British document in great and fascinating detail." --TomDispatch.com

From the Publisher

The British government documents collected in this book, and Mark Danner's analysis of them, are crucial for understanding the events and decisions that led to the invasion of Iraq. Their publication will sustain and inform the public debate about the Bush administration's justifications for war.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: New York Review Books Collections
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: New York Review Books; Main edition (April 4, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590172078
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590172070
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.6 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #250,597 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By William C. Hunt on October 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
In its June 9, 2005, issue The New York Review of Books published an article entitled "The Secret Way to War" in which Mark Danner reviewed and interpreted the recently released secret memo summarizing the main points of a meeting between British Prime Minister Tony Blair, cabinet members, and senior government officials held at 10 Downing Street on July 23, 2002. The book reprints this article as well as critical letters by Knight Ridder Bureau Chief John Walcott and Los Angeles Times reporter Michael Kinsley with the author's response to each. The author adds an afterword and an appendix containing the full text of the Downing Street Memo and seven other British documents pertaining to it.

Danner makes three main points. First, it is clear that the Bush administration had decided to go to war with Iraq eight months before the actual March 19, 2003, attack. Second, from that point the Bush administration set out to "fix" the intelligence to build the strongest argument for war. Third, the Bush administration manipulated the weapons inspections to find a pretext for war even when claiming to use them as a way to avoid war.

Danner distinguishes between the possible reasons the Bush administration wanted to go to war with Iraq ("to remove the threat a hostile and unpredictable dictator was thought to pose . . . to the industrial world's oil supply; to foreclose the possibility of any collaboration between Saddam and al-Qaeda . . .
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If you have missed Mark Danner's articles on the Downing Street Memo in _The New York Review of Books_, here is your chance to learn a little more about the beginning of the war and how, in political thinking, the (wished for) effect can precede the (invented) cause. This book is particularly enlightening now, when the withdrawal of the American military from Iraq finally begins to be discussed. We are told that a withdrawal -- even a gradual and well-planned one - will eventually lead to terrorist attacks on America. Where is the proof? Mark Danner's book reveals the mechanisms of manipulation of public opinion behind this war: we are made to listen to Fear, not to Reason. To be sure, Reason makes mistakes, but Blind Fear's mistakes can be disastrous.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
News junkies could find this story, but the general public was left in the dark. Therefore hundreds of thousands of people died for a lie, and still it is not generally known. Perhaps people don't want to know, it is too unsettling.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse