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How a Seed Grows (Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 1) Paperback – April 10, 1992

4.5 out of 5 stars 54 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-3-- Revised illustrations and format make this book, originally published in 1960, a valuable choice. With charming illustrations and clear text, this simple introduction leads young readers through a series of steps that result in bean plants as well as a basic understanding of how seeds work. Children are encouraged to follow each aspect of the botanical process, from sowing bean seeds, to the growth of tiny root hairs, to transplanting the plant in the garden. Realistic and inviting full-color watercolors show only procedures that are possible for youngsters to follow with minimal involvement from adults. The African-American girl, who is the main character, is definitely in charge; her white male friend performs only menial tasks. --Eva Elisabeth Von Ancken, Trinity Pawling School, NY
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Seeds

How does a tiny acorn grow into an enormous oak tree? At one time, the tree in your backyard could fit into your pocket! Look inside to learn the simple steps for turning a packet of seeds into you own garden.

Seeds

How does a tiny acorn grow into an enormous oak tree? At one time, the tree in your backyard could have fit into your pocket! Look inside to learn the simple steps for turning a packet of seeds into your own garden.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: AD400L (What's this?)
  • Series: Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science 1
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Revised edition (April 10, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064451070
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064451079
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 0.1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #144,444 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By tvtv3 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book should have been more appropriately titled HOW TO WATCH A SEED GROW. Instead of discussing the various stages of development and explaining what happens, the book is basically an extended science project explaining how students can watch a seed grow into a plant. The book talks about the different stages, but only discusses what the planted beans should look like in those stages, not really explaining what is happening or why. Nevertheless, the book does outline a good science project for younger children, but isn't much as a book to read to kids.
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Format: Paperback
If you are looking for a simple "experiment" for the budding scientist in your home, this is an excellent book. As you read this with your young child, he/ she will certainly be inspired to do what the kids in the book are doing; planting a bean seed and watching it grow.

As you read along with the story and follow-up with actually doing the experiment your child becomes part of the story, waiting and watching as his (or her) own seeds develop. Children learn the essential elements of growing seeds. Once you have successfully grown your first bean plants, there is a page at the rear of the book that guides you through additional "experiment" ideas to go even deeper.

This book, because it is on the Stage 1 level, is a bit less informative than the other Let's Read and Find Out Science books that we already have in our growing collection which are primarily Stage 2, but certainly worthwhile in that it guides parent and child through a very simple Science project.

Basic concepts covered in this book in addition to the seed growing are:

1. Counting (stage 1 is geered toward preschool to early kindergarten)
2. Patience (in that you must wait days to see things begin to happen)
3. The ability to follow instructions (the steps to perform the experiments)
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Format: School & Library Binding Verified Purchase
I expected this book to focus on how seeds turn into plants.... particularly to show 1. different types of seeds and what they grow into, 2. go through a basic life cycle of plants, and 3. what a plant needs to live. This book did that but not very effectively as it should have. The book focused on doing an experiment instead of just teaching the material. So the images were of the experiment not detailed images of the plant's life cycle.

The experiment from the book was to use old egg shells and an egg carton to germinate 12 bean seeds. Kids were to dig up each seed at a different time frame to see the progress/plant life cycle. The experiment was not even a good selection in my opinion. Egg shells are fragile and hold very little soil AND little kids are very clumsy.

My first alternative experiment... Instead of germinating been seeds in egg shells filled with soil - you can instead watch germination by placing a few seeds between moist paper towels. Use brown paper towels (like what is provided in many public bathrooms) because the roots are white and the contrast will make them easier to see. This also leaves more seeds to plant in the garden because you only need 2-4 seeds instead of 12.

My second alternative.... another way to watch germination and plant growth is to get a terrarium or aquarium (I had one just sitting in the garage) - if you don't want to drill in drain holes into the tank (as I don't), fill the bottom of the terrarium with a layer of rocks and a layer of carbon, fill the rest of the tank with good potting soil. Obtain seeds of varying types in order to see what different roots look like (carrots, radish, beans, etc.). Plant the seeds directly against the glass all the way around the edge of the tank.
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Format: Paperback
What this book is NOT, to be clear, is a good read-aloud. It's tedious if used that way.

What it *is* is a good, step-by-step instruction of a basic science project for little ones. If you use it that way, reading every step as you go through it and not before, it's wonderful.

I find the reading age suggested on this book (3-6) to be a little young. Try 6-8 instead.
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Format: Paperback
We enjoy the "Let's - Read - & - Find - Out" series of books. This one is a good addition, explaining seeds on my five year old son's level of understanding . Something that many adult writers of childrens' science books sometimes aren't very good at getting across. It is in my child's library at school.
The books in this series are informative and interesting for their target audiences. The illustrations are well done and add to understanding the process being described. They make it easier to follow for kids.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We've gotten this book out at least a dozen times from the library, so I finally just bought a copy.

We live in Phoenix, so we plant our gardens 3 times a year. Everybody gets their own garden with their own seeds. My youngest makes sure we all have a windchime in our garden, as well.

And we always go through this book the week we plant -- even though my kids know the steps, the book makes it so interesting for them to follow along. The illustrations are really clear. For homeschoolers, this makes a nice tie-in for journaling -- you could even do measuring and charting -- and of course, what you grow, you can enjoy! We love this one and the "Magic School Bus" planting seeds books.

The illustrations and text are not babyish -- this book is great.
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