Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The Selfhood of the Human Person

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0813208657
ISBN-10: 0813208653
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$8.47 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$12.47 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
13 New from $12.47 16 Used from $8.47
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$12.47 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Usually ships within 1 to 4 weeks. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Selfhood of the Human Person
  • +
  • Person and Being (Aquinas Lecture)
Total price: $27.47
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

This work is a serious philosophical study full of many rich insights that advance significantly our understanding of the human person. -- Norris Clarke, S.J., Fordham University --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Crosby unfolds the mystery of personal uniqueness, shedding new light on the incommunicability and unrepeatability of each human person. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 313 pages
  • Publisher: The Catholic University of America Press (October 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813208653
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813208657
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #575,536 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
67%
4 star
0%
3 star
33%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
While drawing on an extensive body of scholarship, Crosby's textured analysis of selfhood hews closely to lived experience. It is this experiential orientation that makes Crosby's work accessible to a non-philosophical audience. Crosby also provides an antidote to certain strains of personalist thinking that reduce the person to a "system of relationships." While giving transcendence and relatedness their due (especially in light of such moral phenomena as value response and obligation), Crosby takes pains to anchor relationality in a prior understanding of the person as a unique individual, characterized by self-possession and incommunicability.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book by a Catholic phenomenologist marks a milestone in philosophical anthropology. It is probably the most significant original contribution to the field in recent years, from the perspective of phenomenological personalism, to appear in the English language. No less important, it is clearly and accessibly written. Any reader who has languished through the iniquitous translation of Karol Wojtyla's THE ACTING PERSON, or who finds phenomenological approaches frequently impenetrable and mystifying, will be pleasantly surprised by the remarkable clarity and accessibility of Crosby's crisply-written and well-organized presentation. Crosby draws from phenomenology (Scheler, Wojtyla, Edith Stein, and his own mentor, von Hildebrand), personalist sources (Kierkegaard, Newman, Wojtyla again, and Josef Seifert), neo-Thomism (Maritain) and the philosophia perennis, combining many of the same sorts of perspectives one finds in Wojtyla. Readers of Crosby's painstaking phenomenological analysis of human "selfhood" may find portions of his discussion sufficiently penetrating and compelling to induce an eerie sense of having been conducted into the precincts of that profound, mysterious interiority called the "self" as if for the first time.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliant essay on the human person following the personalist/phenomonological line of thought (a philosophical approach taken by our beloved pope John Paul II).

To do this book justive, a single reading does not suffice; it needs several readings, not because it is hard to follow - not at all! Crosby is very readable - I found it very comprehensible and I am not trained in philosophy.

No, it is simply because there is so much in this book; such as the role of immanence and transcendence in the human person - what does it mean to say that persons possess a kind of incommunicablity? When does a person become a person? Am I not a person if I am not conscious? (no!) Do I lose my personhood, if, for example, I go into a coma? (no!) Is an embryo a human person? (yes!) What is it about persons that make them unique or incommunicable? How does incommunicability tie in with man's social dimension? So, what is it that makes me a person? Is it "esse" or being, a concept that has been lost sight of since Descartes. Yes, but not in the narrow scholastic sense, a person is not simply defined by "esse" - I am getting out of my depth here! But, it seems to me it is precisely in the area of subjectivity that personalism has advanced our understanding of personhood.

Let me make some quotes to give the reader an insight into how good a book this is:

"is there in each person essential content that is beyond the distinction between universal form and concrete substance, so that the essential content is not just participated in but rather completely possessed by the person, possessing it in such a way so as to eliminate the possibilty of another person participating in the same essential content.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: humanism