Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Selling Science: How the Press Covers Science and Technology (Revised) Revised Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0716725954
ISBN-10: 0716725959
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$6.89
Condition: Used - Good
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean. Great Binding. Cover Shows Light Wear. There is a signature on the inside front cover.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
23 Used from $1.57
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
More Buying Choices
6 New from $41.99 23 Used from $1.57 1 Collectible from $32.00
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Up to 50% off select Non-Fiction books
Featured titles are up to 50% off for a limited time. See all titles
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This well-documented study of science writing for the general public in the United States is frequently critical in tone. Nelkin demonstrates through many quotations that science writers frequently act as promoters of science and technology, depicting scientists as miracle workers who are constantly achieving "breakthroughs." She is properly scornful of the superficial, "gee whiz" brand of coverage so often produced by the popular press; she examines the constraints and pressures on science writers and explores the sometimes uneasy relations between research scientists and science writers. A challenging, worthwhile book, recommended for academic and public libraries. Jack W. Weigel, Univ. of Michigan Lib., Ann Arbor
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 217 pages
  • Publisher: W.H. Freeman & Company; Revised edition (February 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0716725959
  • ISBN-13: 978-0716725954
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #332,729 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
50%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
50%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Dorothy Nelkin was one of the premier "field" sociologists of science during the past 35 years, until her untimely death in 2003. She studied and wrote abundantly about the most intense science controversies of the post-war era: nuclear power, military research, foetal and DNA research, genetic modification, and much more. As part of this work, she was constantly involved in observing and analyzing how the media, as the most public forms of knowledge transfer, handled the different sides in any debate and how the knowledge itself was represented. Her book "Selling Science" comes directly out of this experience, and it is sobering. Nelkin shows how the style and information needs of the news media (as well as its logistical demands) differ profoundly from those for scientists, leading to perceptions and realities of misrepresentation.

No scientist who deals with the media should be without this book. Its examples are dated (from the late 80s and early 90s), but its points remain wholly intact. The recent scandal of how the media handled the climate change issue in the U.S., favoring ideas of "uncertainty" in the name of "balance" (while being deeply influenced by a tiny but vocal minority of global warming deniers) is certainly a case in point.

The book should also be read by all students of media studies, and by journalists themselves.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
If you are interested in science writing and how scientists and those who write about scientists' work influence and affect eachother, you might find some useful information here. Otherwise, I wouldn't bother.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse