Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$1.96
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by AZ_Fulfillment
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: [Solid Condition Paperback. Cover may have wear. May contain writing/markings. May be ex-library copy. Any CD/DVD may have been removed by previous user. Expedited Shipping Available]
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Sense of Sin Paperback – Bargain Price, March 29, 2011

2.8 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback, Bargain Price
"Please retry"
$82.89 $1.94

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Essex pits a delightful bluestocking against a mysterious blackmailer and a vengeful rake in late 18th-century Dartmouth in this well-researched but uneven tale, a loose sequel to The Pursuit of Pleasure. Rupert Delacorte, Viscount Darling, blames the beautiful Celia Burke, who would rather study botany than attend balls, for his sister Emily's suicide. He vows to ruin her in return. When Rupert and Celia are anonymously blackmailed, they initially suspect each other, but are soon drawn together by their shared loss and an intense sensual attraction as they struggle to uncover the real culprit. Celia is effectively characterized as a would-be academic with a charming mix of intelligence and innocence. Despite some overwrought prose and clumsy handling of the mystery element, the slow buildup of the romance is skillfully handled and takes impressive advantage of the sexual tension created by delayed gratification. (Apr.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Elizabeth Essex is the award-winning author of the critically acclaimed Reckless Brides historical romance series. When not rereading Jane Austen, mucking about in her garden or simply messing about with boats, Elizabeth can be always be found with her laptop, making up stories about heroes and heroines who live far more exciting lives than she.  Her books have been nominated for numerous awards, including the Gayle Wilson Award of Excellence, the Romantic Times Reviewers' Choice Award, and RWA's prestigious RITA Award, and have made Top-Ten lists from Romantic Times, The Romance Reviews and Affaire de Coeur Magazine. Her fifth book, A BREATH OF SCANDAL, was awarded Best Historical in the Reader's Crown 2013. Elizabeth lives in Texas with her husband, the indispensable Mr. Essex, and her active and exuberant family in an old house filled to the brim with books. You can sign up for her newsletter at: eepurl.com/bQgwk9
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Brava; 1 edition (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0758251564
  • ISBN-13: 978-0758251565
  • ASIN: B008SLHQIM
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 1 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,861,788 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Harriet Klausner #1 HALL OF FAME on April 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
In 1794 England wannabe botanist Celia Burke still grieves the suicidal death of her best friend Emily Delacourt although a year has passed. Emily's brother Rupert has struggled to move on though he has indulged in all sorts of hedonistic activity.

However, he finally decides Celia caused his sister's death and vows vengeance by ruining her. When each is blackmailed, they assume the other is the culprit. However, as they spend time together, Celia and Rupert find a common bond in their love for the late Emily. They realize that someone wants to extort money from both of them, when Celia goes to London for the season she finds love.

This is a warm late Georgian romance with a twisting suspense subplot refreshing the otherwise well written but typical story line. Celia and Rupert are fully developed lead characters whose connection is the late Emily; readers meet Emily as this pair perceive her. Sub-genre readers will enjoy the transformation of the lead couple from enemies to loving partners as a predator cleverly manipulates the grief impacting both of them.

Harriet Klausner
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Relying on misunderstandings and a little vengeance A Sense of Sin is a late Georgian set novel that has a too good to be true heroine and a hero who is conflicted about his heroine.

Rupert Delacorte (Del), Viscount Darling hates Celia Burke and he is so angry he has decided to ruin her reputation even though he has never met her. He is convinced that Celia is a shallow, vain uncaring woman who only pretended to be his younger sister, Emily's, friend at their finishing school. Rupert's sister committed suicide and Rupert blames Celia based on letters he received. Not only that, Rupert has received a threatening letter that he believes Celia sent to him demanding money in exchange for silence about his sister's death.

Celia turns out to be very different from what he expects. She is gorgeous, a little shy, and unaffected. When she tries to express her condolences on his loss he gives her the cut direct.

Celia is surprised at Del's reaction. When she was at school she read Del's letter to her friend Emily and fell in love with him through his letters. She is dismayed to feel that he does not like her and even more upset when she receives threatening letters too. Celia believes Del is behind them as they reference his sister.

Del wrestles with his feelings for Celia, she seems to be so generous and he falls into a wager of being able to seduce her without ever touching her. Even though she seems genuine, Del still cannot forget about the blackmail note.

Celia is captivated by Del and thinks she can control the situation with him and what she believes to be his blackmail attempt. Celia is actually very very kind and forgiving of people's faults and this is what wins Del over.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
the plot elements had promise, and the villains were unusual, but this book seemed to have been written without a master plan. The main characters, particularly the heroine, were poorly drawn. The hero's motivations were erratic, and his master plan, verbal seduction, was just silly. Events seemed to occur at random as though the author was making it up as she wrote it. I also was dismayed to see expressions and words zused that are not true to the period. The final product never should have been published without some competent editing. I have read much better books by this author and was very disappointed with this one. It's headed for the delete pile.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse