Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy New
$58.50
Qty:1
  • List Price: $65.00
  • Save: $6.50 (10%)
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Sense of Space (SUNY ... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Sense of Space (SUNY Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy) Hardcover – August 24, 2004

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$58.50
$58.50 $663.51

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$58.50 FREE Shipping. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is a very rare book in many ways. First, it directly engages scientific literature that treats the experience of space; not since Merleau-Ponty himself has there been a comparable engagement. Second, it institutes a lively debate with this literature that shows how a different model from that of science--including ecological science as practiced by J. J. Gibson and dynamics systems theory--is required in order to avoid positing a ready-made world taken for granted, or else an infinite regress of models. Third, Morris draws in everyday experiences of space and place in order to elucidate the deep problem of depth--a problem that heretofore has not been elucidated so intelligently and imaginatively resolved. Fourth, he adopts a developmental perspective on perception and motion that makes his work virtually unique and that brings additional light to bear on the question of depth. Fifth, Morris explores the implications of his model of depth for the experience of place in human experience--a bold undertaking that succeeds remarkably well. In sum, this is a groundbreaking work."

What Morris has produced is a subtle retelling of Merleau-Ponty s phenomenological story, one that in emphasizing the role of movement in the development and expression of the body schema [schema corporeal], leads us even more emphatically to ethical questions. Research in Phenomenology
Morris s book is an invigorating, subtle, and suggestive account of spatial perception the issues raised by his book are rich and complex and fully worth chewing over. Dialogue
Faithful to the tradition in which he situates himself, Morris makes skillful use of phenomenological examples to support and clarify his theoretical suggestions The Sense of Space is a highly successful, informative, and insightful engagement with some of recent European thought s most significant influences and its correlative dedication to a genuine thinking of immanence. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology
In his investigation of the sense of space, Morris not only makes a significant contribution to the development of the phenomenological inquiry into the body of which Merleau-Ponty is one of the pioneers, but the particular modes of argument he deploys, as well as the conclusions for which he argues, have a significance that goes beyond merely the philosophy of the body as such. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences
Morris compellingly assumes the style of the Phenomenology, employing vivid experiential descriptions and scientific case studies while, like the later Merleau-Ponty, driving these phenomenological investigations to fruition in a primordial ontology of chiasmic reversibility that precedes and grounds subjective experience [the book] is written in expressive yet technical prose [and] is an invigorating alternative to scientific and traditional explanations of spatiality. His thesis binds together traditionally isolated questions, placing expression, emotion, and ethics in the very depths in which we dwell. Symposium
Readers interested in embodiment should find the book interesting. University of Toronto Quarterly
I like the combination of sober scholarship with imaginative thought and writing. David Morris is fully at home in phenomenology, while being quite knowledgeable of existing and pertinent scientific literature. Having mastered both, he creates a dynamic tension between them, showing how each can fructify the other, albeit in very different ways. The result is truly impressive.
This is a very rare book in many ways. First, it directly engages scientific literature that treats the experience of space; not since Merleau-Ponty himself has there been a comparable engagement. Second, it institutes a lively debate with this literature that shows how a different model from that of science including ecological science as practiced by J. J. Gibson and dynamics systems theory is required in order to avoid positing a ready-made world taken for granted, or else an infinite regress of models. Third, Morris draws in everyday experiences of space and place in order to elucidate the deep problem of depth a problem that heretofore has not been elucidated so intelligently and imaginatively resolved. Fourth, he adopts a developmental perspective on perception and motion that makes his work virtually unique and that brings additional light to bear on the question of depth. Fifth, Morris explores the implications of his model of depth for the experience of place in human experience a bold undertaking that succeeds remarkably well. In sum, this is a groundbreaking work. Edward S. Casey, author of Imagining: A Phenomenological Study, Second Edition"

About the Author

David Morris is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Trent University.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: SUNY Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy
  • Hardcover: 232 pages
  • Publisher: State University of New York Press (August 24, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0791461831
  • ISBN-13: 978-0791461839
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.8 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,280,053 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By John Russon on May 20, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is a fabulous book, which should be read by anyone interested in phenomenology, in cognitive science, or in perceptual psychology, and probably by anyone seriously interested in philosophy. In stylish, exhilirating prose, Morris takes us deep into the rich connection of the moving body and the earth, and he develops a philosophically rigorous conception of the body that is responsive to the dynamic and perceptive character of our bodies. Morris's philosophical orientation is primarily drawn from Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological philosophy, but he relies on resources as varied as psychological accounts of infant development, the poetry of Pablo Neruda, the weightlessness-experiments of Lackner and various engaging personal anecdotes. Overall, Morris's account challenges the sterility of many traditional scientific accounts of the body and spatial perception, and replaces them with a phenomenologically rich account that is perhaps most impressive for its demonstration of the centality of emotional and ethical values at the very heart of our bodily engagement with space. This book fits well with the works of cognitive science by such figures as Francisco Varela, Shaun Gallagher, Evan Thompson, Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, Mark Johnson and George Lakoff, and also with contemporary work in Continental Philosophy by such figures as Ed Casey, David Wood, John Llewellyn, Len Lawlor and Renaud Barbaras. Very highly recommended!
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What does it mean to have a sense of space? Enveloped as we are in the depths of a world that radiates about us, space’s intimacy has nonetheless never ceased to pose problems for our many attempts to give an account of it. With David Morris’s book in hand however, the many mysteries of space reveal themselves to be far less daunting – if not far more interesting – than we once thought. Taking his cue from the ‘problem of depth’, Morris sets himself the challenge of developing an account of depth perception that would not fall into the impasses posed by ‘inferential’ approaches to depth, approaches which construe depth as an inferential projection of two-dimensional ‘sense data’. As Morris notes, such accounts inevitably presuppose the very answer they seek to provide: why would we even begin to make such inferences if we were not minimally acquainted with a sense of depth to start with?

In order to escape the “Hydra of blooming explanatory heads” that accompany such accounts, Morris’s book charts a vertiginous path that weaves its way through phenomenology, ecological psychology, dynamic systems theory, and child developmental studies in order to develop an account of depth – and hence space – which would do justice to precisely this primordial sense of bodily depth. Key to Morris’s approach is a refiguring of space no longer in terms of a homogeneous, geometric expanse laid out according to ready-made metrics, but rather space as it is lived by moving, breathing, animated beings.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: consciousness, access consciousness