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Shaken 'N' Stirred

March 27, 2007 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:53
30
2
4:17
30
3
4:08
30
4
4:15
30
5
3:47
30
6
4:44
30
7
5:11
30
8
4:38
30
9
6:03
30
10
5:12
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 19, 2007
  • Release Date: March 27, 2007
  • Label: Rhino Atlantic
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:08
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00122RDAA
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,640 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Shaken 'N' Stirred is one of those albums you'll either love or hate ... there's no in between. I personally loved it. Cuts like
Too Loud and Sixes and Sevens truly rock out. Robert plant showed his experimental side on this release. You may have to listen to it a couple of times to truly appreciate it. I love all of Plants stuff, but this is one of my favorites. Good music from a great artist.
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Format: Audio CD
Shaken 'n' Stirred (Robert Plant's third solo release) is an entertaining and somewhat unconventional piece of music. There's a total of nine songs. I find every one of them to be worthy and pleasing. Some of the material is in a straightforward pop rock musical direction, while other tracks are in an experimental pop rock vein. Six of them also contain female backing vocals. The songwriting is good and creative, the musicianship is proficient, and the production is tight. The keyboards (played by Jezz Woodroffe) are a prominent facet throughout the album. Robbie Blunt's guitar work mostly takes more of a secondary role--except for "Kallalou Kallalou" and "Pink and Black." When it comes to the vocals, Plant does a nice job. Ritchie Hayward's drumming is skillful and taut, too. The tune that I enjoy the most is the straight-ahead, atmospheric "Little by Little." The smooth "Sixes and Sevens" is also a gratifying ballad that's just over six minutes in duration. The song from Shaken 'n' Stirred that I find to be the most offbeat and adventurous is the quirky "Too Loud." The aspects of this sprightly tune that attract me especially are the weird-sounding keyboard work, the lighthearted, interesting vocals from Plant, and the female background vocals. Another one that's progressive in style that I like is "Trouble Your Money"--it resembles something that the Police would write. I enjoy how this ambient track rises and falls in intensity. "Doo Doo a Do Do" is also a song that's different and pleasing; it features cool keyboard playing and energetic female backing vocals. The CD insert doesn't include the song lyrics. The disc is just over 42 minutes long. Shaken 'n' Stirred is an album that's eclectic and worthwhile.
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Format: Audio CD
You know, most people seem to malign this album, the last with his best band (echoing a previous sentiment). This album was both a direct response to the music Plant was hearing at the time and a direct break from the Zeppelin albatross. People who don't like this disc might have a problem with its synth sound or the fact that it doesn't sound anything like the previous two albums or anything past it, but allowing it to stand on its own merit, free from the "but it doesn't sound like Zeppelin" whine that prevails against so much of his solo work, shines a light of clarity on an album of considerable thought and mastery of the moment. Plant and company accomplished more on this disc than he would until Dreamland. It would have been interesting to see where else he would've gone with this band, but he switched gears for the next album, and Blunt, Woodruffe, Martinez, and Hayward (and Halliday) were gone. More's the pity that 66 to Timbuktu all but ignored this disc, showcasing only Little by Little... give this disc a try, remembering that it is a fearless statement by a legend who had covered the musical gamut in his previous band.
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Format: Audio CD
I bought this album when it was originally released and was very disappointed. I was looking for something more similar to Plant's first two solo efforts, Principle of Moments, and Pictures at 11. This album is a big departure from those albums and from previous Zeppelin works. However, 15 or so years later, giving the album a second chance, I see that it is not so bad. You have to have an open-mind to appreciate it though and not be expecting something similar to the prior works I mention. It is more upbeat and seems less serious than the previous works. It also features female background vocals on some songs, which were and still remain to me the least desirable element on the work.
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Format: Audio CD
Out of the whole Robert Plant discography, this album in my opinion is his most challenging and eclectic album. Eclectic is not a term I usually use when talking about most music, but this album truly is. No matter how much I've listened to this in the past few years I can't find a music category to peg it in, but that's what's so good about it. I don't count Shaken 'n' Stirred as a favorite album, but I do respect it for it's eccentric flavoring. It's more synth-based than his previous couple of albums, and there's something for everybody on this collection. Although the album is more synth-oriented, the guitar is not ignored. Favorites are the challenging "Little by Little," the weird "Too Loud," and the closing tune "Sixes and Sevens." This album truly holds a place of its own compared to the other albums. Shaken 'n' Stirred also sports an excellent production. I have to give this album a three star rating on this review, but if I could grade it with a half, I'd give it three and a half stars. Worth a listen.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This, Plants third solo album, is a real departure for him. His first two solo slabs were works of brilliance, no doubt about it. But if anything that only raised the bar for his future releases.

And this collection of what can only be loosely termed songs is a total departure from Plants first two solo outings. Those albums were fully of perfectly crafted rock 'n' roll songs that had quite traditional structures. Here all bets are off in an almost cheeky fashion, playful collections of sounds sprinkled into the listeners ear. There are still guitar riffs here, still Plants easily recognisable vocal stylings and beautiful touches, the opening to Trouble your Money being particularly reminiscent of earlier triumphs.

But none of the cute playing, simple and gentle production or the good vibes carried over from his first two albums can save this from being anything but nonsense. Art pop, if you will. In fact it's art pop even if you won't. A series of noises strung out until the approximate length of a song is reached, none of the tracks here being necessary to your life and few having any real reason to be, a bunch of weird time signatures, disjointed instrumentation and gimmick joke fills by many and varied instruments all put together to disguise the fact that nobody here has much to say. Only the human feel of earlier Plant albums helps hold this lot together, something which can't be said for the next album, Now and Zen. Though with that album the tunes are a heck of a lot stronger.

I've really enjoyed Plants solo career, but this is for completists only as it's so radically different to his other stuff. The 'lost' Plant album, so to speak. You've been warned.
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