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Sharks Don't Get Cancer: How Shark Cartilage Could Save Your Life 1st Edition

1.9 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0895295200
ISBN-10: 0895295202
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 186 pages
  • Publisher: Avery; 1 edition (May 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0895295202
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895295200
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 1.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,347,472 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on May 6, 2004
Format: Audio Cassette
Sharks do get Cancer. The use of Shark Cartilage as a cure for cancer is unfounded and the collection of Shark Cartilage is jeopardizing the ecosystem and hopes and finances of cancer patients. Please read the research about Shark Cartilage from George Washington University and John Hopkins University, both universities are very well know for their contributions to medical health.
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By A Customer on February 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
Dr. Lane wrote this book so he could sell his shark cartilage. He wrote this book to sell a product that does not work. Sharks do get cancer, but incidences of cancer are much lower than in humans. The shark immune system may be better adapted to combat cancer. That does not justify grinding up shark cartilage and selling it. Dr. Lane's company sells the stuff for $130 a pound. I would reccomend reading "The Shark Chronicles" by John A. Musick. The book does a great job of describing this awe inspiring creatures.
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Format: Paperback
My mother died of cancer, which might have been prevented if she hadn't believed in shark cartilidge bunk and used proper medicine instead.
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Format: Paperback
There is not much to say here. Sharks do get cancer, both cancer patients and sharks lose from the myth that they do not. Cancer patients waste money and possibly vital treatment time using shark cartilage to no effect, and sharks are killed in incredible numbers to provide the 'medicine'. Would you eat ground up rhino horn? It is essentially the same thing.
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Format: Audio Cassette
Sharks don't get heartburn, athlete's foot or jock itch. So what?

This book is about bad science at its worst.
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Format: Paperback
Quit buying this junk that pseudoscientists are selling to make a quick buck.

Sharks do get cancer.

A scientific study done by researchers at the Mayo Clinc showed not only that this stuff doesn't work, but "toxicity related to shark cartilage resulted in significant trial drop out after one month."
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Format: Paperback
Amazon, please remove this product now. Dr. Lane is (actually was, he died this year) just a shill trying to sell a product that his company Lane Labs makes.

The claims that shark cartilage has any medical benefit have been completely disproved many times now. And in fact, the product may do more harm than good because of possibly high mercury content. The FDA has banned Lane Labs from selling shark cartilage and two other questionable cancer products ([...] and [...]) and ordered them to pay restition to anyone who purchased these products as well as a $1 million fine.

You can get the true facts on the myths about shark cartilage products here [...].

This entire line of prodcuts is based on claims that sharks don't get cancer which is completely untrue. Sharks do get cancer ([...]) yet a study conducted in 2004 did indeed find cancer in sharks and tumors were even found in chark cartilage.

And yet, these products are still being marketed and sold to the unsuspecting public and they do nothing but give false hope to the consumers and line the pockets of the manufacturers.

Mankind (a misnomer if ever there was one) kills over 73 million Sharks per year mostly for the Shark Fin soup in China and other Asian markets. We don't need another product that further helps to drive these essential predators of the oceans to excition.

We kill the sharks, we kill the oceans. We kill the oceans, we kill ourselves. It's that simple.
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Format: Paperback
Scientific studies have been unable to provide any compelling evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of shark cartilage as a therapy for either curing or preventing cancer.

Yet because of the disinformation presented in books like this, cartilage, regardless of the facts, has become a staple among the myriad of phony miracle cancer cures that sick, desperate, and despairing cancer sufferers may be all too willing to try in the impossible hope that it will help them. Unfortunately, shark cartilage's efficacy as a treatment is rooted solely in the realm of pseudoscience and in the claims of snake oil salesmen like William Lane who sell it.

Even if sharks do have a natural immunity to cancer - a central premise of the book that has been shown to be false - who is to say that grinding them up and eating them would convey any benefit? Does eating poultry help us fly?

For those who are suffering from cancer, staking the money that it costs to purchase and ship this book doesn't seem to be any smarter than staking one's life on its claims by forgoing chemotherapy treatment for cartilage as a review below describes. Who wrote that review anyway? William Lane?
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