Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Showcase Presents: Superman, Vol. 1 Paperback – October 1, 2005

4.4 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.98 $5.10

Read "The Killing Joke" and related graphic novels
Batman: The Killing Joke
Batman Vol. 3
Batgirl Vol. 1
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 3 Up–Twenty-nine Superman comics published between 1959 and 1963 are reprinted in this black-and-white omnibus edition. A perfect example of the tone of the collection is the opening tale, a jolly mystery that culminates in Batman throwing his old chum Superman a birthday party. For all of the hokey word balloons that spell out Superman's choked-back sobs of anguish at whatever bizarre circumstance he finds himself in, and despite Lois Lane's constant bold proclamations of her intent to marry the Man of Steel, the pages contain a massive catalogue of invention. Many of the stories consist of Superman's clever ways of convincing Lois that he's not Clark Kent, or persuading some criminal that he's now immune to kryptonite. The text is fraught with barefaced exposition, but the tricks, traps, puzzles, and quandaries that Superman constantly outsmarts are charming and should give readers a clear indication of what comics were like in an earlier age and how they captured the imaginations of young readers so well and so completely. The stories also provide a happy sampling of the first appearances of a number of Superman's notable supporting characters and beloved minutiae.–Benjamin Russell, The Derryfield School, Manchester, NH
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (October 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401207588
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401207588
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 1.2 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,141,427 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As other reviews of books in the Showcase Presents series have noted, this is DC's version of the Marvel Essentials series-- B&W reproductions of comics published decades ago. The comics in this particular edition were originally published between June '58 and Nov '59, when I was eight and nine years old and a voracious comics reader. Even now, I can actually remember reading some of the particular comics that are in this book, and while, to an adult, the stories here are simplistic and even sometimes silly, it was, for nostalgia purposes alone, a real delight to get to re-read them again for the inexpensive price of ten dollars. In fact I sort of feel sorry for children growing up now, who have to make do with comics that are kind of grim and sordid, in contrast to the clearly drawn, cheerful and good-hearted ones that existed back in the fifties and sixties.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm only in my 20s, definitely not the traditional age for Silver Age fans, but I've loved these simplistic, often goofy stories for years. I buy quite a few modern comics, but I always make time for things like this. DC's Showcase line is a Godsend! In this volume, we have over 500 pages of classic Silver Age stories that are brimming with endless possibilities. This was in a time where creators weren't afraid to throw logic out the window if it made for a more entertaining story. Some of my favorite moments from this book include:

-Batman shopping for a birthday gift for Superman at the mall, in full costume!

-President Superman solving the budget deficit by filling Fort Knox with treasure he found in wrecked pirate ships on the ocean floor.

-Batman taking a week off from crimefighting so he can break into the Fortress of Solitude and play pranks on Superman.

-Superman scheming to eliminate the manifestation of his new power: a tiny version of himself that grows out of his hand, and steals his thunder!

-Superman becoming a lion.

-Superman using his super vision to see through the time barrier!

this book is filled with such craziness, from cover to cover. There's never a dull moment. And for less than $10, there's no reason not to check it out.
1 Comment 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
What parent doesn't want their son to be honest, helpful, brave, kind, courteous, and patriotic? Clark Kent was all of these things in 1958--kind of corny, huh? Then I guess, Corny is good--especially when you talk about our kids.

But I love these stories for the cheezy (by today's standards) mysteries. How did Superman know ...? And some of the stories are classics, the first Metallo, first Supergirl, his first real proposal to (guess who)...

And I love the turmoil Clark experiences guarding his greatest secret. Clark wants to tell Lois "I'm Superman, let's get married and live happily ever after." But no; if the world knew his identity, then his friends would be in constant danger. So Clark sacrifices his own desires for the safety of his friends and the good of his country.
That's right, I said country. Superman was a proud American before his last movie--in Superman Returns, he stands for Truth, Justice, and "all that other stuff."
Lets see you keep your greatest talent a secret from all your friends.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This monster sized 560-page collection contains 17 months of Superman stories from June 1958-November 1959.

To enjoy this book, you have to understand Superman of this era. The Superman Stories of the early Silver Age are not primarily considered about Superman's rogue's gallery or finding some challenge that's physically equal to the Man of Steel. Very few stories in this book are about that. What made Superman stories interesting to folks in the late 1950s was that the books were about Superman. Superman has a ton of superpowers and is the type of scientific genius/troubleshooter who could give modern-day Batman a run for his money.

But the guy's got problems. He wants to maintain his identity as Clark Kent and keep his job at the planet. He's got countless villains after him and Kryptonite seemed to be plentifully available. Superman's problems are different, though, so more people will empathize with Peter Parker being bullied then Superman having his head turned into a lion.

Simply put, Superman is pretty interesting guy and complaining about quality of villains is like whining about the quality of opponents the Harlem Globetrotters play. No one is there to see the Washington Generals. Same thing with Superman. Who cares if he's taking on Sinister Thug #20. The writers make it seem interesting.

So what does this book have? It features issues of Both Superman and Action Comics. The Action Comics story would usually be 12-13 pages long. The Superman books were longer but usually came with three stories eight-to-nine pages in length.

Superman firsts and old favorites: DC's decision to begin in 1958 wasn't arbitrary. Some pretty amazing things happen right off the bat. Action Comics #241 introduces the arctic Fortress of Solitude.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I own several of the other Showcase Presents featuring more esoteric characters (Phantom Stranger, Jonah Hex, Enemy Ace, Metamorpho) so this is the first "mainstream" DC book I've bought, and I love, love, love it.

So much of the Silver Age can be tedious, but each story was so much fun that I could barely set this book down.

See the first appearance of Bizarro and Supergirl! Marvel at the lengths Lois Lane will go to marry Superman! Witness the embarrassment Clark Kent will endure to protect his secret identity!

Whoever selected these stories did a great job. One thing I would like to see added is some biographical information, particularly for unsung writers like Bill Finger. Perhaps that could come in an introduction, maybe written by a comics historian.

I'm going to buy copies for my elementary-school-age nephews (it can double as a coloring book) and collect more for myself.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: superhero novels, comic-trade-paperbacks