Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by skyvo-direct-usa and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Shutter Island has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by secondspin
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All used discs are inspected and guaranteed. Used discs may not include digital content.
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.40
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$16.58
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Add to Cart
$25.56
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express US
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Shutter Island Soundtrack

4.6 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Soundtrack, February 2, 2010
"Please retry"
$16.52
$4.97 $4.40

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started
$16.52 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by skyvo-direct-usa and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Shutter Island
  • +
  • The Blue Notebooks
Total price: $28.00
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Oscar®-winning director Martin Scorsese, Shutter Island is the story of two U.S. marshals, Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Chuck Aule (Mark Ruffalo), who are summoned to a remote and barren island off the coast of Massachusetts to investigate the mysterious disappearance of a murderess from the island's fortress-like hospital for the criminally insane.

The soundtrack produced by Robbie Robertson, & executively produced by Martin Scorsese.

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Fog Tropes (Orchestra of St. Lukes, conducted by John Adams)
  2. Symphony #3: Passacaglia - Allegro Moderato (National Polish Radio Symphony, conducted by Antonio Wit)
  3. Music For Marcel Duchamp (Philipp Vandre, prepared piano)
  4. Hommage a John Cage (Nam June Paik)
  5. Lontano (Wiener Philharmoniker, conducted by Claudio Abbado)
  6. Rothko Chapel 2 (UC Berkeley Chamber Chorus)
  7. Cry (Johnny Ray)
  8. On The Nature Of Daylight (Max Richter)
  9. Uaxuctum: The Legend Of The Mayan City Which They Themselves Destroyed For Religious Reasons - 3rd M (Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra; Peter Rundel, conductor)
  10. Quartet For Strings And Piano In A Minor (Prazak Quartet)

Disc: 2

  1. Christian Zeal and Activity (John Adams / Edo de Waart & San Francisco Symphony)
  2. Suite For Symphonic Strings: Nocturne (The New Professionals Orchestra, conducted by Rebecca Miller)
  3. Lizard Point (Brian Eno)
  4. Four Hymns, II For Cello And Double Bass (Torleif Thedeen & Entcho Radoukanov)
  5. Root Of An Unfocus (John Cage)
  6. Prelude - The Bay (Ingram Marshall)
  7. Tomorrow Night (Lonnie Johnson)
  8. This Bitter Earth / On The Nature Of Daylight (Dinah Washington & Max Richter)


Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 2, 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Rhino Records
  • Run Time: 138 minutes
  • ASIN: B002MJM87K
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #31,789 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By E. Ganev on February 28, 2010
Format: Audio CD
This pair of discs contains a wonderful collection of contemporary classical music. In most cases Amazon's tracklisting only provides the names of the performers, so I took the liberty to list the composers for the various tracks.
Ligeti's 'Lontano', an old favourite of mine, is also used to great effect in Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining', a movie that evoked similar emotions with me (although I consider 'The Shining' a truly great movie).

CD 1
1. Ingram Marshall - Fog Tropes
2. Krysztof Penderecki - Symphony No. 3 - IV. Passacaglia - Allegro moderato
3. John Cage - Music for Marcel Duchamp
4. Nam June Paik - Hommage à John Cage
5. György Ligeti - Lontano
6. Morton Feldman - Rothko Chapel 2
7. Johnnie Ray - Cry
8. Max Richter - On the Nature of Daylight
9. Giacinto Scelsi - Uaxuctum - III. [untitled]
10. Gustav Mahler - Quartet in A minor for piano and strings

CD 2
1. John Adams - Christian Zeal and Activity
2. Lou Harrison - Suite for Symphonic Strings - IX. Nocturne
3. Brian Eno - Lizard Point
4. Alfred Schnittke - Four Hymns - II. For Cello and Double Bass
5. John Cage - Root of an Unfocus
6. Ingram Marshall - Alctraz - I. Prelude: The Bay
7. Lonnie Johnson - Tomorrow Night
8. Max Richter/Dinah Washington - On the Nature of Daylight/This Bitter Earth
1 Comment 90 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
One of the great joys of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey was the extraordinary soundtrack. Not satisfied with Alex North's original score, Kubrick went with a selection of classical pieces, some familiar like Strauss's The Blue Danube and others less well-known such as Ligeti's Atmospheres. That soundtrack became a classic and Shutter Island is easily in the same league. Like 2001, the music for Shutter Island comes from a number of classical composers and none of the pieces used was written specially for the film. In my opinion, the Shutter Island soundtrack is superior to 2001 in that the music sounds like a coherent score, quite like Bernard Hermann's work for Hitchcock in places.

For anyone interested in contemporary classical music, some of the composers represented here will be familiar names, for instance, John Cage, Krzysztof Penderecki and Alfred Schnittke. Others, like Max Richter, were unknown to me. Richter's On The Nature Of Daylight is a haunting piece and features twice on the soundtrack, the second time in a memorable mash-up with Dinah Washington's This Bitter Earth. A real bonus is a complete performance at the end of CD 1 of Gustav Mahler's only chamber piece, his Piano Quartet in A minor written when he was only sixteen.

The music on this double CD was clearly chosen with great care and intelligence by Robbie Robertson. He has created a collection that will appeal on several levels. Those who have seen the film can acquire a musical memento of Martin Scorsese's extraordinary achievement.
Read more ›
1 Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
What's interesting about the score to Shutter Island is that none of it was composed exclusively for the film, but there's plenty of orchestrated music that fits the movie beautifully. Scorsese actually had Robbie Robertson, who worked on the music for The Departed and Gangs of New York, to find existing songs to use for the film. And to his credit, Robertson did a great job.

Songs that are alone worth the price of the CD include the utterly gorgeous and hope-inspiring composition On the Nature of Daylight by composer Max Richter. Lontano and Symphony #3 are beautifully composed works that lend to the sinister feel of the film.

Some of the songs (Music for Marcel Duchamp) are incredibly stark with almost no instrumentation, but still add to the foreboding feel of the movie. Songs like Lizard Point and Prelude - The Bay add a floating, atmospheric element to the score. And a few tracks aren't even what you'd consider music, such as the sound-effect driven Hommage a John Cage. Robertson does effectively keep with the time period for the movie, with 1952 tracks like Cry (crooner Johnnie Ray) and 1948 blues ballad Tomorrow Night (Lonnie Johnson).

These aren't CDs that you would necessarily play from start to finish like those of a movie with an entirely orchestral score, but the music is still haunting and beautiful. It's a must have for anyone that's a fan of movie scores.
4 Comments 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: MP3 Music
Reviewing "This Bitter Earth" only here: I've listened to over a dozen arrangements of this song, and I can truly say - this is beyond reproach. This is permeating, it will penetrate all that was come to pass and surpass all that is yet to come. Magnificent - to say the least.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Originally, I approached this compilation album for the Mahler selection, though when I saw that many of the selections were taken from contemporary classical composers whom I knew little or nothing about, I decided this would be a excellent way to experience an overview of unfamiliar music. And, since very little of the music had made a conscious impression on me as I had watched the film - other than the Mahler - I had no idea what to expect; even the few pop songs included didn't ring an immediate bell with me. After repeated listenings, I still a bit surprised at how well I like this effort; the disparate recordings lead me through an emotional narrative at once unsettling yet bittersweetly resolved, and I am extremely impressed with not only the original artists work, but the skill of the compiler.

Perhaps it shouldn't be surprising that Robbie Robertson - best known to me as the guitarist for The Band - should be the supervisor of this score, but it was. It just wasn't what I had associated him with. Still, I think he has constructed a superbly affecting collage, often eerie, punctuated by oddly perky popular music from the time period of the film, which, embedded next to pieces such as Penderecki's Allegro Moderato from his symphony #3, seem to take on a bizarre, disjointed meaning completely in keeping with the nature of the film's themes. There are two selections that I am simply incapable of appreciating yet: Nam June Paik's Hommage Á John Cage, with its frankly unnerving re-mix of distorted, disembodied voices, and then a piece by John Cage himself - Root of an Unfocus, where the insistent percussive tones are, I think, an acquired taste.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Shutter Island
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Shutter Island


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: vinyl pop