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Shuttle Down Mass Market Paperback – March 12, 1981

4.1 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Del Rey; First Edition edition (March 12, 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345292626
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345292629
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,783,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Lee Correy (G.Harry Stine) does an excellent job of using his extensive aerospace background to provide technical accuracy in Shuttle Down. That background ran from early 1950's White Sands Proving Ground (before it was White Sands Missile Range) to NASA's manned programs. He also shows his political experience with, and understanding of federal agencies by showing how bureaucratically bloated NASA, the State Dept, and the Air Force have become. Stine first crossed swords with the Feds in 1957, just a few weeks after moving from White Sands to Martin Marietta in Baltimore. When Sputnik was launched that autumn, Harry found the press, (or they found him). He made some critical comments about our fledgling space program, and was promptly fired. Of course, he was right. From this book, it is obvious that he continued to follow the ever increasing bureaucratizing of NASA. I knew Harry at White Sands, and have read many of his other writings. He was typical of the many very bright young rocket pioneers in that era after World War II and before Sputnik. I am saddened to learn that he is no longer with us.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I remembered this Harry Stein book from the serial in Analog Magazine back in the '70's or '80's. Although the shuttles no longer fly, this has some very good lessons about the lack of foresight, and the massive logistics brought to bear, to get a Shuttle MECO that lead to Easter Island. One of the offshoots is that right after this was published all shuttles carried FAA airworthiness certificates, and all shuttle crew carried passports. NASA learned some lessons from this.

This is the first used book I've bought from Amazon. It arrived quickly, had yellowed pages as you would expect from its age, and I once again lived the nightmare of the engineering and logistics team, and glad that my job didn't seem quite so bad any more.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
A good old fashioned rollicking yarn. Written by a journeyman writer in unembroidered prose which never gets in the way of the story, this is the work of a pro with no word which doesn't advance the reader's engagement and omitting nothing needed for its development. This book is a good investment of the reader's time and money: An example of the best golden age science fiction writing by a usually unsung author.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Lee Correy is the pen name of the late G. Harry Stine, an ex-NASA launch safety officer. As can expected from that backround, he knows exactly what can go wrong on the Space Shuttle, and the how to create the worst situation for NASA short of another Challenger disaster. During a routine launch to polar orbit from Vandenburg AFB (which once upon a time NASA had intended to be a second launch site), the shuttle Atlantis suffers a shutdown on all three of it's main engines. Halfway across the Pacific and unable to make orbit, the only place Atlantis can land is the most remote spot on Earth, Easter Island. Though the crew lands safely, NASA's troubles are only beginning, as they realize how ill-prepared they are for a landing in a place that's literally 3000 miles from anywhere. Between flying in supplies and equipment, dealing with a touchy political situation in Chile (Easter Island's colonial master), and convincing a skeptical American press that they can bring their bird home safe, there's plenty going on. Though the characters barely rise above the level of cardboard props, the political and technical details are what makes this book a success. It can be taken as a high sign of this book's accuracy, that NASA bought several copies when they realized it pointed they had never negotiated an emergency landing treaty with Chile!
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