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Siempre a tu lado (Hachi: A Dog's Tale) (Original title: Hachiko) (Two-Disc Blu-ray/DVD Combo) [Blu-ray] [*Ntsc/region 1 & 4 Dvd. Import-Latin America] - Latin America Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 4,086 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Plot Synopsis
Based on the 1987 Japanese film Hachiko Monogatari, as well as on a true story, Hachiko: A Dog's Story stars Richard Gere as a college professor who finds an abandoned dog and takes the poor lost animal in. The film follows the two as the man and animal soon form a strong and unexplainable bond. Joan Allen co-stars in the Inferno Entertainment production.
Sinopsis
El profesor parker Wilson (Richard Gere) es un distinguido catedrático que un dia en su camino a casa del trabajo, descubre a un cachorro Akita perdido. A pesar de las objeciones iniciales de su esposa Cate (Joan Allen), Hachi se gana el cariño de la familia de Wilson y crece hasta volverse un fiel compañero para Parker. A medida que su vínculo se hace más profundo, una hermosa relación se comienza a desarrollar, convirtiéndose en una muestra del verdadero siginificado de la amistad y la lealtad, inspirando incluso a todos los habitantes del pueblo.

Product Details

  • Actors: Richard Gere, Joan Allen, Sarah Roemer, Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa, Erick Avari
  • Directors: Lasse Hallström
  • Producers: Richard Gere, Bill Johnson, Vicki Shigekuni Wong
  • Format: NTSC, Blu-ray, DVD
  • Rated:
    G
    General Audience
  • Run Time: 93 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4,086 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0041IMY6K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #625,137 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
As a grown man not prone to crying, by the end of this film I was a blubbering mess, and I've probably not shed a tear in more than ten years. Anyone who loves dogs, I imagine, will be in the same state after witnessing the amazing loyalty displayed by one selfless canine.

I'd actually heard the story many times. A loyal dog returns to train station to meet his master even after he dies. But the film really brings the point home following the entire life span of the dog. But what I feel makes this film stand out is how it shows the perspective of the dog, a great reminder that "Hachi" is the protagonist in the film and giving insight into the emotions he felt. Additionally, the dog was portrayed as a dog, not a human character in a dog suit capable of impossible feats and acts, which for me, made the story so much more enjoyable and made the dog so much more believable.

Please disregard the one-star rating given by the Akita breeder in Nevada who didn't really rate the film so much as criticize peoples tendency to purchase dogs because of movie influences. It should also be noted that the Japanese Akita as a breed would have most likely disappeared had it not been for the original Hachi's popularity in Japan during the 1930's when the story was popularized by local newspapers of the time.

I would rate this as probably the best dog movie ever to come out of Hollywood. If you've made it so far as to read reviews, you really should just buy it. I can't imagine any dog lover being disappointed in this magnificent film.
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From Tokyo, where the film has just opened: In Japan, most people know about Hachiko, especially in Tokyo; his statue is a popular meeting place in the Shibuya shopping area. The true story of Hachiko is just as well known here in Japan. In this review, I assume that you know the basic story outline. Still, if you wish to avoid what you may consider a spoiler concerning a turning point in the story, then avoid reading after this paragraph, as I discuss a central plot point--but not one which really gives too much away, any more than it spoils the movie "Titanic" to know that at some point, they hit an iceberg. Still, I wanted to warn you just in case--someone who never heard of the Titanic before might enjoy the whole iceberg twist.

The story: a faithful dog comes to meet his master at the train station every evening when he returns home, and when the master, a college professor, dies at his school and does not return, Hachiko continues to come and wait at the station every day for nine years to wait for his master's return. The very thought of such a loyal, sweet animal being so, well, doggedly committed to finding his master is bound to bring tears to most people's eyes--and it didn't fail here, with there being a considerable amount of sniffling and eye-dabbing in the theater. "Not a dry eye in the house" comes to mind. If you like schmaltzy tearjerkers and cute fuzzy dogs, then this is your kind of movie.

The basic story remains the same as the actual one, but builds up a new human dram around the dog story--which succeeds in not detracting from the central story at the same time. You never stray far from the dog, it's clear that Hachi is the protagonist and at most we spend three minutes away from him at any one time.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This brilliant film, full of magnificent performances, does not preach, but will pierce the hardest heart.
I extend my deepest appreciation to Mr. Hallstrom, Richard Gere, Joan Allen, and the Akita trainers for bringing this unforgettable story into my home, where it will be enjoyed again, and again.
My wife, who NEVER comments on a movie, said "That was one of the best movies I have ever seen."
Our 14-year-old Beagle usually rests in one place for ten minutes and moves to another spot in the room. While we watched HACHI, she remained between us on the sofa for the entire movie. She sensed our contentedness and rose only to lick our faces during the film's powerful emotional scenes.
Kudos to Mr. Gere for his diligence in making his relationship with the dogs feel genuine...and for the most amazing death scene I have ever witnessed portrayed in a film.
Since the real HACHIKO died in 1934, this film was long overdue, but more than worth the wait.
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"Hachiko: A Dog's Tale" is directed by Lasse Hallstrom (The Cider House Rules), and is based loosely on the real life story of a dog, named Hachiko, who was born in Odate, Japan in 1923. His master, Dr. Eisaburg Ueno, was a professor at the University of Tokyo who died in 1925. Hachiko returned to the Shibuya train station the next day, and every day for the next nine years until he died in 1934. Today, outside the Shibuya train station, where Hachiko waited, is a bronze statue of Hachiko.

In this particular movie we have a similar story, only the dog is in transport to the United States, where he escapes, and ends up in Parker Wilson's (Richard Gere) possession. Parker eventually decides to keep the dog since the owner cannot be found. Hachiko, or Hachi, as he is usually called here, at one point breaks free of his yard, and follows Parker to the train station. Eventually Hachi is allowed to accompany Paker to the train station everyday. But at one point Parker never returns to the train station, since he has died at the university.

The movie then becomes a tale of a loyalty that reaches far into the bonds of memory. Hachiko never realizes that his master has died, and even though he never sees his master again, he never forgets him. What is Hachi's purpose now that his master has died? His purpose seems to be to wait for his master who will never return. It is at once moving and heartrending, as it is a tragedy of sorts, and one that is only resolved once Hachiko also dies. This is a beautifully told tale that makes one think about the things that are important for us to go on living, even after those that we have loved have died.
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