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Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro Lens for Canon SLR Camera

4.7 out of 5 stars 870 ratings

Price: $569.00 & FREE Shipping
Brand Sigma
Lens Type Telephoto
Compatible Mountings Canon EF
Maximum Focal Length 105 Millimeters
Minimum Focal Length 105 Millimeters

About this item

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  • Designed for use with full frame digital SLR cameras. May also be used with smaller APS-c size sensors with a corresponding effective increase in focal length to about 150mm with most cameras
  • Focuses down to 1:1 magnification ratio at its closest working distance of 12.3 inches
  • A hood adapter, lens hood, front & rear lens caps are included with the lens
  • Filter size 62mm

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Customer Rating 4.7 out of 5 stars (870) 4.7 out of 5 stars (769) 4.9 out of 5 stars (888) 4.4 out of 5 stars (46) 4.8 out of 5 stars (3412) 4.5 out of 5 stars (1498)
Price $569.00 $599.00 $1,299.00 $794.99 $149.00 $569.00
Sold By PhotoCraft -- District Camera and Imaging Amazon.com Amazon.com Digital Goja Amazon.com Adorama
Color Black Black Black Black Black Black
Compatible Camera Mount Canon EF Canon EF Canon EF Sony E, Sony E Canon EF-S Nikon FX
Focus Type Ring-type ultrasonic Ring-type ultrasonic Ring-type ultrasonic Autofocus, Autofocus Stepper motor Ring-type ultrasonic
Item Dimensions 5 x 3.07 x 3.07 inches 2.99 x 2.13 x 2.13 inches 4.84 x 3.07 x 3.07 inches 5.26 x 2.91 x 2.91 inches 0.91 x 2.68 x 2.68 inches 5 x 3.07 x 3.07 inches
Item Weight 1.60 lbs 1.32 lbs 1.38 lbs 1.58 lbs 4.41 ounces 1.60 lbs
Lens Type Telephoto Telephoto Telephoto Macro Wide Angle Telephoto
Maximum Aperture 2.8 millimeters 2.8 f/2.8 2.8 millimeters 2.8 millimeters 2.8 millimeters
Maximum Focal Length 105 millimeters 100 millimeters 100 105 24 millimeters 105 millimeters
Minimum Aperture 22 32 32 16 22 22
Minimum Focal Length 105 millimeters 100 millimeters 100 105 24 millimeters 105 millimeters
Photo Filter Thread Size 62 millimeters 58 millimeters 67 millimeters 62 millimeters 52 millimeters 62 millimeters

Product description

Product Description

The Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro Lens for Canon EOS DSLR Cameras offers advanced performance of close-up photography. The OS (Optical Stabilizer) system enables handheld close-up photography. A Special Low Dispersion (SLD) lens and one high refractive index SLD lens provide excellent correction for all types of aberration and distortion. A floating focusing system moves two different lens groups in the optical path to different positions. This system compensates for astigmatic aberration and spherical aberration and provides extremely high optical performance from infinity to 1:1 Macro.The Super Multi-Layer Coating reduces flare and ghosting, providing high contrast images. It is also possible to use this lens with Sigma's APO TELE CONVERTERS. The HSM (Hyper Sonic Motor) ensures quiet and high speed autofocus as well as full-time manual focus capability. This lens features a splash proof design for use in harsh conditions and a rounded 9 blade diaphragm creating an attractive blur to the out of focus areas of the image.

From the Manufacturer


High performance, large aperture medium telephoto macro lens with OS (Optical Stabilizer).

High performance, large aperture medium telephoto macro lens with OS (Optical Stabilizer). SLD glass provides good control of aberration and the floating inner focus system ensures high rendering throughout the focusing range. By using Sigma's APO Tele Converter, it is possible to take photos at greater than 1:1 magnification. HSM ensures a quiet and high speed AF as well as full-time manual focus override. This lens has a rounded 9 blades diaphragm which creates an attractive blur to the out of focus areas.

Large aperture medium telephoto macro lens

This medium telephoto macro lens allows you to maintain an appropriate distance from subjects while still getting close up photos. Since the working distance at its closest focusing position is 142mm, shadows of the lens and camera will not affect photography making it suitable for taking photos of subjects, such as flowers, under natural lighting conditions. In comparison to the Sigma 50mm and 70mm macro lenses, the main subjects can be defined with perfectly smooth and blurred backgrounds.

Excellent Optical Performance
No Super Multi-Layer Coating (left). With Super Multi-Layer Coating (right).
High rendering performance

The lens power layout produces excellent optical performance. High refractive index SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass corrects chromatic aberration, spherical aberration and field curvature. It ensures high rendering performance at all shooting distances. The Super Multi-Layer Coating reduces flare and ghosting, maintaining quality images with high contrast.

Optical Stabilizer
No Optical Stabilizer (top). With Optical Stabilizer (bottom).
Handheld photography with ease

Sigma's OS (Optical Stabilizer) system offers effective correction of approximately 4 stops. As the stabilization effect is visible through the viewfinder, it aids composition and accurate focusing.

* The OS effectiveness will gradually decrease as the shooting distance becomes shorter.

Floating inner focusing

This lens incorporates floating inner focusing which moves two lens groups separately. This minimizes aberrations which occur as shooting distance changes, and enables stable rendering of the image from infinity to 1:1 magnification. This also corrects image distortion, especially when taking close-up pictures. Since focusing does not change its overall length, this lens is easy to hold and use.

Hyper Sonic Motor (HSM)
Hyper Sonic Motor
Quiet and speedy AF

HSM indicates lenses equipped with a Hyper Sonic Motor, driven by ultrasonic waves. HSM provides quiet and high speed AF. It is also possible to use full-time manual focus, even if the lens is set to autofocus.

Rounded 9 blades diaphragm
Rounded Diaphragm

This lens has a rounded 9 blade diaphragm which creates an attractive blur to the out of focus areas. This also creates smooth, rounded out of focus highlights when taking photos which have a strong light source in the background such as lights shining on the surface of water.

Lens Construction
Lens Construction

In a conventional lens, focusing requires an extension of the entire lens or the front lens group. However, to better accommodate autofocusing mechanisms and closeup photography, a need has arisen for lenses that do not change their length during focusing or suffer from focus-dependent variation in aberration. Therefore, Sigma has developed focusing systems that only move elements within the lens barrel. These incorporate smaller and lighter moving lens elements which help improve auto-focus speed. With their unchanging barrel length and small variation in the center of gravity, these lenses also enhance balance and stability for the photographer. Furthermore, since the front of the lens does not rotate, polarizing filters can be used with extra convenience.

Specifications
Lens Construction 16 Elements in 11 Groups
Angle of View 23.3 degrees
Number of Diaphragm Blades 9 Blades (Rounded diaphragm)
Minimum Aperture F22
Minimum Focusing Distance 31.2cm / 12.3in.
Maximum Magnification 1:1
Filter Size Diameter 62mm
Dimensions Diameter 78.3mm x Length 126.4mm / 3.1in. x 5.0in.
Weight 725g / 25.6oz.
MTF Chart
MTF Chart

MTF (Modular Transfer Function) is one of the measurements that evaluates a lens' performance, and it contrasts sensitivity at different spacial frequencies. The horizontal axis is in millimeters and shows the distance from the center of the image toward the edges, and contrast value (highest value is 1) is shown in the vertical axis.

The readings at 10 lines per millimeter measure the lens' contrast ability (red lines), repeating fine parallel lines spaced at 30 lines per millimeter measure the lens' sharpness ability (green lines), when the aperture is wide open. Fine repeating line sets are created parallel to a diagonal line running from corner to corner of the frame, are called Sagittal lines (S) and sets of repeating lines vertical to these lines are drawn, called Meridional (M) line sets.

Distortion
Distortion Chart

effective distortion: When you take a picture of a lattice pattern, it will appear as the blue dotted line shows. the red line illustrates how the lattice pattern will appear in the actual picture when any lens distortion is taken into account.

relative distortion: In this chart, the horizontal axis shows the ideal image height (the distance from the center to the edge of the image [mm]). The vertical axis shows the extent of distortion. The extent of the distortion is represented by how much Y, which is the actual image height, grows (or shrinks) against Y0 which is the ideal image height.

Extent of distortion: D[%]=(Y-Y0/Y0)x100

When you take the picture of a square object, if the distortion amount show a minus value, the image will be seen as expanded (Barrel distortion). If the distortion amount is a plus value, it will be seen as a recessed (pincushi on distortion). When the distortion value is close to 0, the appearance of distortion is very minimal.

Vignetting
Vignetting

The horizontal axis shows the image height (the distance from the center to the edge of the image [mm]). The vertical axis shows the amount of light in the image (based on the amount of light in the image center being 100%). If the peripheral amount of light is lower than the center, the four corners of the image will be darker (vignetting).

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4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5
870 global ratings
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Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on December 28, 2018
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great macro lens with one serious flaw
By Wigged Out Fat Guy on December 28, 2018
This sigma lens is a great macro lens with one serious flaw that I will discuss in the review. As with all WOFG reviews, I will cover the pros and cons, offer advice for how to use the lens, and also offer suggestions for other lenses at the end and why you might want one or the other.

Note - This is a review for the Canon mount of this lens, though most of this will also apply to other brand mounts, as they are for the most part the same lens just with a different mount. Optically and feature wise they will be no different no matter what camera mount the lens has.

Pros

1. Very sharp – Oh baby is this lens sharp! Sigma is well known for their quality of optics in their primes, and this lens does not disappoint. This was my first Sigma lens, and most certainly will not be my last. I will let the images speak for themselves.
2. Price – Its base price is kind of high (969 USD), but this lens has had an ongoing 400 dollar instant rebate for a long time that brings it down to 569 USD (sometimes lower), and I don’t see that changing. At the reduced price I would say this lens competes well against lenses like the Canon 100mm F2.8 IS macro, and I would suggest it over the non-IS model from Canon for macro work. The Canon lenses will outperform the Sigma in auto-focus, and have very few cons, but for the money, the Sigma is still a great lens. If trying to decide between the two I think it comes down to what and how you shoot. If you shoot only macro, and use mostly manual focus techniques, the less expensive Sigma will be fine. If you rely more on auto-focus and want to use it as a multipurpose lens, the Canon has better performance, but the Sigma still does alright. Both are very sharp lenses, neither will disappoint there as long as you understand what you are getting.
3. Vibrant colors – I love the color this lens creates. Sometimes it is so vibrant I have to turn it down a bit in Lightroom! Though it can make things look a little surreal too, which is cool if you like that, but if you don’t you will need to do some kind of post processing. For macro work that is a good idea anyway, since so many macro shots require at least a little work in post.
4. 1:1 magnification – True macro, this achieves 1:1 magnification at the min focus distance. Nothing else to say there.
5. Edge to edge sharpness - Another thing to point out is that the sharpness carries from center to corner, as will most lenses that are true macro lenses. This is great for recreating the details found in small items, which is what a macro lens does best. Even at min focus distance this lens is sharp edge to edge.
6. Good working space – Speaking of that min focus, it is just over a foot at 12.3 inches (31.3cm for you metric folks). So if you account for the length of the lens and the depth of the camera, this gives you about 6-7 inches of workspace around your subject. This makes it easier to get more light on your subject, something that is critical to macro.
7. Optical Stabilization – This is the Sigma version of IS, and this lens is rated for 4 stops. However, I have not really pushed this to test the limits just yet, and I would suspect it cannot do 4 stops at macro ranges (I don’t think any macro lens can). I know I have been as low as 1/40 sec on my 80D with this lens from about 8 inches away. That would be 2 stops. If I looked through my collection I doubt I would find a lot that are shot slower than that at macro range, if any. If you can’t hold steady enough at 1/40 sec then there are some other things to look into (see notes about shooting techniques).
8. F2.8 aperture – Good for exposure and background blur. Makes this a well-rounded lens. As long as you can deal with the noise the focus motor makes you can use this for just about anything that the focal length allows (see cons for more info about the noise issue).
9. Portraits – For those not in the know, macro lenses make great portrait lenses too! This is due to the high level of clarity they have from the center to the edge of the frame, with great color and details. They also typically have fairly wide apertures too, like F2.8. This allows for good isolation of the subject from the background with the ever coveted bokeh effect. Combined with the longer focal length, this lens makes a pretty good portrait lens. It’s better on a full frame due to having a wider angle of view, but on a crop camera it will take good tight headshots. And since it has a good min focus, it can actually be better for this than a 70-200mm can, as the closer you are to your subject the better the details.
10. Other stuff – 9 blade aperture makes smooth background blur. Lens hood is included, and has an extended hood attachment for when being used on APS-C cameras (not sure if it is really needed though, and I have never used it). 4 year warranty is 4 times better than the Canon models, and is part of the reason I would suggest it over the non-IS model for about the same price, as well as the OS.

Cons (Most this is for your information only, and is not worth a star off. It is up to the user to know what they are getting and how to use it. If I have removed a star for any reason I will make note where and why)

1. Noisy Autofocus and OS motors – This lens has a lot of noise coming from the focus motor as well as the OS drive. It is noticeable even if not holding the camera up to your face. This is pretty common of Sigma lenses that came out in this same generation, and newer designs are much better (Art lenses are amazing). This is an issue that Sigma should get resolved, though that will not likely happen unless they do a new version of the lens. It might not be as big an issue for some as others, and the degree of severity might differ from lens to lens, but I have heard from plenty of other users they are experiencing this with this lens. 1 star off – for just being a loud lens overall.
2. Build quality is iffy – It’s not bad, but it most certainly is not as good as other Sigma lenses I have seen (Art series, Sport series). The casing is plastic, but otherwise looks nice and feels pretty good. The switches are raised and easy to switch, but they feel like they don’t always click all the way into position. I have a feeling that if anything is going to give me grief at some point, it will be the switches, but so far so good. It is a large lens too, if that matters to you. For me it is not a real big deal, since I am a big guy, but for others it might be. Also worth pointing out is that this lens is not weather sealed in any way, so take care not to get it wet. At the full price of 959 I would expect better build quality than this. At the typical price of 569 I really wouldn’t have any higher expectation than what it is. I would only remove a star for this at its base price of 959.
3. Not USB dock compatible – If you are not aware, Sigma makes a dock that can attach some of their lenses to a PC via USB, and this allows for updates to the firmware as well as adjustments to the focus. This lens unfortunately is not compatible with this dock (It predates that design). Since this is a prime lens though, if you are experiencing forward or back focus you can use micro adjustments on your camera to fix this, so long as your camera has this function. I have not had to make any adjust to mine, but I use manual focus almost exclusively with this lens, so I really can’t say one way or another.
4. Auto-Focus is not so great at close distance – This is only for using at macro distances, but once you get close the lens will hunt for focus a lot. This is not uncommon, all macro lenses struggle at this range without a lot of light on the subject (even then it is still not great on the Sigma). Some tips – Instead of trying to allow the camera to find focus for you, set your lens to manual and then move the focus to the minimum for 1:1 magnification. Then physically move your camera towards or away from the subject. At some point the subject will be in focus as it moves along the plane. Then take your shot. I like to use burst mode for this, and slowly move forward and back while snapping shots. This increases the odds you will get a keeper, and if done right can be used for image stacking (a post processing technique for increasing depth by combining several shots). I would also shoot at F8 to increase the depth, to get more of the subject into focus, F16 if your camera doesn’t suffer from too much diffraction (or if you don’t care about diffraction). This does reduce your exposure, so be sure to also have light. A ring light that mounts on the front of the lens is probably the cheapest way to go. There are also macro flashes that mount to the front, but they are expensive. I have also used Speedlights with reflectors on them, both on and off camera. There are a lot of ways to get light on a subject for macro, just google “macro lighting techniques”.
5. Other Stuff – 62mm filter thread is not common, so no filter sharing without step up or down rings, same goes for front lens caps. Lens hood has some odd attachment for APS-C cameras that is not able to be stored on the lens (too small to be reversed) and makes the hood huge when attached to the lens. I have never used it so I really don’t know how to explain what it is for and the info on the Sigma website is limited (supposedly adds even more shading, but only on crop cameras). I wouldn’t bother with it for anything macro related.

Conclusions
With the 400 dollar instant rebate I would call this lens a contender. When compared side by side with the Canon 100mm macro lenses, I feel that the overall image quality is on par; you would be hard pressed to notice any real difference between them. For overall performance, the Canon 100mm F2.8L IS outperforms it, but at a high premium. I would say if you shoot your macro shots in manual the way I have described, then there is little reason to drop so much money on the Canon. If the noisy AF and OS are going to be an issue for you, then the Canon model will be a better bet (look in the suggestions for a better comparison). With any luck Sigma will redo this lens as an Art lens, and fix all the issues. I would expect though, that would also bring the price back up to somewhere around 1000 or more, which puts it at a higher price than the Canon, which begs the question, why bother? At its current price it has a special place in the market, offering a stabilized lens with high quality optics for a much lower price than you would normally pay. I think for now this is what Sigma is going to be offering, and in my eyes the cons are outweighed by the pros due to how I use the lens. It is a personal choice though, and macro can be a tricky thing to do. I would only suggest this lens to people that are already pretty familiar with macro. If you are looking at a macro lens for the first time, this can still work for you, if you are willing to learn how to make it work.

Other suggestions. It wouldn’t be a WOFG review without suggestions!
1. Canon 100mm F2.8 Macro IS USM – I think this is the lens people are going to want to see a comparison with, since they are similar lenses. The Canon is just all around a better lens; better build, not noisy, better overall AF performance for all uses (though neither lens is very fast due to slower gears meant for fine macro focusing). The IS/OS are about the same, neither gives more than 2 stops for macro, and 4 stops for all other shooting, but the Canon is also silent here. IQ wise, I think they are neck and neck; both make beautiful images. The Canon is a more expensive lens though, typically priced at 900 USD. If you must have the advantages of the Canon, then I can respect that, after all it is one of the best they make. Just know that it is frequently reduced in price these days, sometimes as low as 699, but most the time 750 or 800. If you can handle the lens as I have described, the Sigma will give you great IQ for a much lower price. If you want to also use the lens for portraits, then the Canon might be a better option, since the noisy focus will not only be a distraction to your model, but it draws the wrong kind of attention to you (makes people think you have shoddy gear). The Sigma does take good portraits too, if the noise doesn’t matter to you. For me it is a real toss up, so I went with the cheaper lens. If you do decide the Canon is more your style, then wait for a sale. One last note – I do not suggest either as a portrait lens on a crop camera, at least not as the main lens. I would suggest something more in the 50mm range on a crop camera for portraits. This is because the crop factor makes the lens way too tight. Good for headshots, but not much else.
2. Canon 100mm F2.8 Macro USM non-IS – The older 100mm Canon that does not have IS, it’s a good one. New it is a little cheaper than the Sigma at 500 USD, but I don’t know that it is a better lens. The IS and 4 year warranty on the Sigma are probably worth the extra 70 dollars, but I mention this Canon lens since it can be found commonly for 350 to 400 dollars used. That is pretty cheap for such a good lens. I don’t think I would risk a used copy of the Sigma lens, since it does come from a generation that was not the best for build quality, but the Canon likely would be fine (their lenses are built to last). Brand new I would get the Sigma over the Canon any day for the small difference in price.
3. EF-S 60mm F2.8 Macro USM – This is for crops only, since this lens will not fit on a full frame camera. This is one of the best crop-only lenses Canon makes, and it is so very good. So sharp, great performance, excellent portraits, great color. I can’t say enough good things about it. If you would like more info on it, you should check out the review I have for it on my profile (also the top review on Amazon for the 60mm lens). I would suggest it over the 105mm for two reasons. First, the wider angle of view overcomes the crop factor (96mm after crop vs 168mm). The other is price, it is 400 USD new, and sometimes as low as 350. If you have a crop camera it is one I recommend. But, the Sigma has other advantages too, as sometimes that added reach helps, and you will have greater working distance to let you get more light on your subject. It just depends on what you shoot. Check out the review for a better explanation, as I don’t want to spend too much time on it here, since this is not a review for the 60mm lens.

That is all I got. All that is left is to check out the images. Thank you for reading my review! Please check out my profile for more reviews of gear, and if you found this helpful then remember to hit that helpful button. Thanks again!
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Reviewed in the United States on March 19, 2018
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Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2017
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great macro for price
By Elizabeth Bradshaw on September 29, 2017
Take a sharp pictures. Image Stabilization is a plus with macro. Auto Focus was a little tricky at first which is why I give 4 stars. Nothing that can't be managed. Overall, this is a great lens!
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Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2020
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5.0 out of 5 stars Picture Quality
By Scottie on January 22, 2020
This is by far the best lens I have in my bag. I have been using extension tubes to capture my macro pictures and while they have done a good job the quality and sharpness of my photos were just ok. This 105 mm lens has made me realize how mediocre my previous photos were. I had read reviews saying that this lens also takes great portrait pics and as they say, seeing is believing. The pictures are so sharp and vibrant it's unbelievable. I am very happy with my purchase.
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Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2020
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tack Sharp Images
By Kirk B. on January 12, 2020
I've used this lens on insects, flowers, plants and one cat portrait and it can produce some tack sharp images. I'm going out here in a few minutes to get some portraits of some squirrels. Enough said, my pictures will take over and speak for me now.
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Reviewed in the United States on May 17, 2020
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Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2020
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Reviewed in the United States on May 16, 2019
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Top reviews from other countries

Vimesy
5.0 out of 5 stars High quality, good value.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 30, 2016
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5.0 out of 5 stars High quality, good value.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 30, 2016
I have to say that I have been blown away by this lens.
Before buying I did a bit of research and found that this lens was out-performing much higher priced lenses, just as well really because at the time I bought it I was a little fiscally challenged.
The lens comes in a robust, padded case. The instructions are good and the two lens hoods are good quality.
There are three distance settings on the lens which will keep it from hunting across its range for point of focus. I found the AF, when distance limited to be quite quick, for subjects that are further away it isn't bad but not lightning quick by any means.
Manual focus is with the fantastically large focussing ring, this is very positive in movement.
Image stabilisation is very good, and indeed very welcome! Stabilisation has two three settings, off, all axis and one for use when on a tripod, can't remember off hand what axis this is for. It is good though and very noticeable in use.
The f2.8 max aperture gives the ability to really throw the background and provides great bokeh.
All in all a great lens that I am more than happy with. I have had no regrets at all about buying the lens and have no plans to replace it with a more expensive manufacturers model.
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freewheeling frankie
5.0 out of 5 stars great value macro lens
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 10, 2017
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kappel79
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Macro Lens for Canon 5DS
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 2, 2018
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Macro Lens for Canon 5DS
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 2, 2018
Nice lower priced macro lens with stabilizer.

I was looking at the Canon L and the non L lens and then I saw that one, the price was right and the IS was a bonus I would not really need anyway.

The lens is great for macro and the AF hits very well on macro level also, if you use no tripod. Landscapes or portraits all works with that great piece of glass. I use a Canon 5DS the AF points will only work if they are cross types but who cares at macro and for a quick portrait 9 af points are enough to choose from. If you can overlook a stuck AF focus from time to time and see the IS as a bonus feature the lens will bring you a lot of fun.

Many people complained the noise of the IS, it only makes a very silent tack when it starts, different from a Canon IS, but the Canon can be also noisy when in use. But why would I care when I take pictures about sound or noise?

It is also a great walk around lens (very cool with the IS) if you like the 105mm length, I would use my Canon 85mm f1.8 to walk around but since I have the 105 I dont change the lens very often anymore.

Comes with lens hood, case and good lens cap.

I would have given 5 stars, but the AF stuck sometimes is a !bad bad! thing from Sigma and should not go through QC ever.

I added some pics I took so far with this lens.
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Mr. G. T. Martin
5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVE MACRO and this Sigma Macro Lens.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 18, 2020
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5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVE MACRO and this Sigma Macro Lens.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 18, 2020
I am adding this "hobbyist" review of the Sigma lens because I am so happy with it!

Some notes on my photographs. This was the first day I had the lens, I am NOT a photographer and all the photos are taken with the lens on a Canon 4000D which is also new. They are all taken handheld only, as I do not have a tripod as yet. I only use the "Ai" auto function as I have only had the camera for a week so don’t really know all the functions yet.

I bought the camera and lens because I wanted something to do through the current lockdowns, isolating and staying at home. I am an avid birdwatcher and walker, but not interested in photographing them. But I was interested in plants, fungi and other things I find along my walks. I originally bought the Tamron 55mm-300mm Macro lens which is over half the price but it gave really disappointing results for me.

The Sigma lens on the other hand is just amazing and I am really happy with the quality of the results (well, for a non-photographer like me!). I have read further that with a tripod and using the manual settings then the results could be even better. But as my photographs are for personal pleasure, I am pretty happy with them as they are for now.

It was never more true than "Buy cheap, buy twice" as far as this goes. This lens is more than twice the price of the Tamron I purchased, but that shows in both the quality of the photographs and the quality of the build of this lens. It is really sturdy, the switch options are well placed and the focussing is quiet and fast. I also like that it there is no moving telescopic intrusion which I think will be better when I photograph insects or other creatures that may be disturbed by this.

The OS is for stabilising your photographs, there are two options for this which I think is for horizontal and vertical stabilising.

My camera is an “AP-C” and comes with both a lens hood and an adapter which extends the lens hood (not sure why, but I use them anyway).

This lens has taken me to the limit of my budget on photography equipment and I have absolutely no regrets in that regard. I am sure it is going to bring a lot of quality "well-being" time.

Now. If I can just get over my slight arachnophobia I might even be able to get a shot of some wonderful eight-legged beasties.
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Aaandyyy
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent lens BUT....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 4, 2020
Verified Purchase
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