Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$7.86
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Excellent condition - looks nearly new with very light wear. Very minimal wear (if any) on cover, edges and corners. Binding is tight and in excellent condition. Has pristine, unmarked pages. This item ships promptly from Amazon's warehouse with tracking, 24/7 customer service, and no-hassle returns. Eligible for Amazon's Free Super Saver Shipping and Prime programs. Over 70,000 satisfied orders!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's and Age-Related Memory Loss Hardcover – September 20, 2010

4.6 out of 5 stars 132 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$9.15 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

If trying something new can delay or offset the effects of Alzheimer's, as former CNN medical correspondent and syndicated "EatSmart" columnist Carper (The Food Pharmacy) contends, then readers would do well to try many of the ideas she offers in this empowering compendium. Genetically disposed to Alzheimer's, Carper, now in her 70s, has compressed the latest research on this and other types of dementia into short sections, each with a bottom-line action plan. While some are basic to all-around good health (e.g., taking a multivitamin, not smoking, limiting alcohol), others might surprise: consuming apple juice and vinegar, meditating, and surfing the Internet. Although Carper admits she has not tried all of them, she recommends that readers experiment with those best suited to their situations. Even a few nutritional (a Mediterranean diet) and lifestyle (exercise, stress relief, sleep) changes, she states, can gain as much as a decade disease-free, and by supplementing with anti-Alzheimer's powerhouses like niacin, choline, folic acid, and alpha lipoic acid, readers can push mental decline even further into the future. Whether in their 20s or well into retirement, readers will likely feel motivated to do the impossible: beat the approaching epidemic of a disease commonly viewed as hopeless.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Whether in their 20s or well into retirement, readers will likely feel motivated to do the impossible: beat the approaching epidemic of a disease commonly viewed as hopeless."―Publishers Weekly

"It's about time someone has compiled such an important manual of steps we can and should all take to avoid Alzheimer's. Jean has done a skillful job at delivering accessible tips that are backed in science and still very actionable for those of us interested in preserving our intellect and memory."―Mark Liponis, MD, coauthor of Ultraprevention and author of Ultralongevity

"In her usual science-made-simple approach, Jean Carper gives readers of all ages 100 doable strategies for keeping brains sharp and bodies healthy. I highly recommend reading it-and doing it."―William Sears, MD, author of Prime-Time Health

"A wonderful book that appeals to the lay person, physician and scientist alike, with its beautifully outlined 'what to do' approaches to dealing with the threat of such a frightening disease. It is a must read for all of us."―Brian J. Balin, Ph.D., Professor, Center for Chronic Disorders of Aging, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

"In this marvelous book, Jean Carper has done all the leg-work for the reader by basing it on the very recent scientific literature and direct contacts with many Alzheimer's disease researchers. She has a unique and refreshing writing style. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to maintain their cognitive abilities during aging and reduce their risk of Alzheimer's-which should be all of us!"―Gary W. Arendash, Ph.D., Research Professor of the Florida Alzheimer's Disease Research Center

"With style and wit Jean Carper has assembled all the simple things that people can do to delay the onset of age-related memory loss, an idea that may sound revolutionary to some, but is all research-based. My advice is simple: Read this book!"―Norman E. Rosenthal, M.D., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Georgetown Medical School

"There is a gem of knowledge and insight on every page. Jean Carper brings a rare talent to these pages-she helps the reader see the difference between scientific breakthroughs and passing fads. Most important, this book offers hope-something the reader can do right now to change their future. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who wants to protect their minds as they grow old."―Gary L. Wenk, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Ohio State University, author of Your Brain on Food: How Chemicals Control Your Thoughts and Feelings

"A refreshingly positive view of Alzheimer's disease and what you can do to reduce your risk."―Suzanne Tyas, PhD, Associate Professor of Health Studies and Gerontology and of Psychology, University of Waterloo
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; 1 edition (September 20, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316086851
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316086851
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #300,265 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Paul Lappen VINE VOICE on May 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
For anyone in middle-age or older, Alzheimer's Disease is a major concern. This book shows easy ways to delay its onset, perhaps for years.

If the recommendations in this book can be reduced to one sentence, it might be: Eat Right and Exercise Regularly. Eat lots of deep color berries, like black raspberries, cranberries, plums and strawberries; they are full of antioxidants. Apple juice can boost the brain's production of acetylcholine, just like the popular Alzheimer's drug Aricept. Large doses of caffeine, like several hundred mg per day, may help clean up your brain if you are showing signs of mental problems (people react differently to high doses of caffeine, so be aware of the side effects). If you have cholesterol problems, get it under control, now. Cinnamon gives a boost to malfunctioning insulin, allowing it to process sugar normally. Weak insulin can lead to diabetes, and can damage your brain cells. Did you know that coffee helps block cholesterol's bad effects on the brain, is anti-inflammatory and reduces the risk of depression, stroke and diabetes, which all promote dementia?

Mental exercise is just as important as physical exercise. Fill up your brain with lots of interesting stuff, like education, marriage, language skills, etc. You can actually grow your brain with lots of physical, mental and social activities. If you can join a health club and work out regularly, do it. If going for a walk after dinner is more your speed, do it. Conscientious people are better able to cope with setbacks in life, and can better dodge chronic psychological distress, which boosts risks of dementia. If you are clinically depressed, get it treated, or you are more likely to develop Alzheimer's.
Read more ›
1 Comment 64 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Book review by Richard L. Weaver II

You must buy this book!

I have reviewed over 250 books (many of my reviews are categorized under the name of my publishing company, And Then Some Publishing, LLC), but this one -- among them all so far -- is one that should be read by everyone.

If you believe the title, Carper's book is about Alzheimer's and age-related memory loss, but when you read the book you quickly realize it is a book about healthy living, having a healthy lifestyle, and following a regimen that will bring you strength, vitality, and wellness.

100 suggestions seems like a lot; however, when you get going (each suggestion only takes up two or three pages) in this small, 294-page book. She has over 200 references for the book, and she gives you the web site where you can go to check out her sources:

What I especially enjoy is finding a book that underscores and supports the lifestyle that I have already adopted. I found that many of the suggestions by Carper are things I am already doing. Most healthy readers will find the same thing; however, most healthy readers (like myself) will also be interested in obtaining just a little more, going for that extra edge (the extra mile), and not just getting their current lifestyle reinforced but finding something that pushes them a little harder, a little farther, too.

A couple of the suggestions I have highlighted include #24, "Build `Cognitive Reserve'--Fill up your brain with lots of fascinating stuff." That idea delighted me because of the book reviews and essays I write. I think loving school, too, helps anyone build a cognitive reserve right from the outset. Getting immersed in information, learning, knowledge, and experiences builds a useful lifelong benefit.
Read more ›
1 Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
At last--there are some things we can actually do about Alzheimer's!

The author has done a thorough, careful survey of the latest and best scientific research about the causes and prevention of Alzheimer's, and what the findings imply for all of us.

In clear layman's terms,the book tells you what the top researchers have learned about how to prevent and delay the onset of Alzheimer's. And the suggestions for things you can do to prevent it are just as simple as the title promises.

This book is a ray of hope amidst all the Alzheimer's gloom. I'm sending it to everyone in my family.
Comment 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
People are hungry for information on ways they can prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's. Carper gives, in an easy way to digest, 100 simple things you can do. All of them are backed with research. Easy to read and easy to follow. Great that someone has done the digging and put all the information together in a small but powerful book!
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
if you are worried about getting this dreaded disease, there are easy methods of prevention. Eat more cinnamon, vinegar, fish and almonds, work on balance, meditate, drink apple juice (she called it natural Aricept), learn new things and engage socially. Perhaps the best part are the web links she provides to accomplish these things. She cites studies to explain her writings. There are also tips on preventing stroke. I've typed up my notes to share with my family.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Everyone beyond a certain age should be concerned about Alzheimer's. It is a terrible disease. While there is no Alzheimer's in my family, it is a concern. So when a friend who does have Alzheimer's in her family recommended this book, I decided to buy it.

The theory is that you remove yourself from the pool of people who statistically get Alzheimer's. So if Alzheimer's patients have been sedentary, you should exercise, and these are some good ones. If Alzheimer's patients usually have balance problems, you should improve your balance, and here's how. Each trait has a chapter, usually rather short, easy to read, based on studies, but not bogged down in the details that only scientists are interested in. I'm half through the book, and so far the ideas are the ones that we all know are good for you, nothing bizarre.

It makes a lot of sense, is not difficult to follow, and you might even avoid Alzheimer's. It certainly can't hurt, and if it introduces you to new healthy habits, so much the better.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse