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Showing 1-10 of 24 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 39 reviews
VINE VOICEon October 6, 2015
A coherent look at the role of government and effective regulation in a ROI driven world. Building on the authors earlier work, Nudge, the book takes you into the challenges and approaches used by the Obama Administration to evaluate rule making and regulatory decisions. It shows what is possible, and the pitfalls of policy. A good read.
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on March 15, 2017
A clear and concost argument for "smart" regulation. Anyone who believes in efficient and effective government should read this book.
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on August 19, 2016
I liked what I learned about the effort the federal government is putting in to understanding the impact proposed regulation has on the recipients. As well as streamlining or even removing existing regulation.
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on June 11, 2016
A very good book
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on August 18, 2013
While I liked the book, I didn't really feel like it broke new ground. It is not that different from Nudge, and borrows a lot from Thinking Fast and Slow. Thinking Fast and Slow is a much better book and includes more detail for those interested in behavioral economics and the psychology of decision-making.

I was also hoping that Sunstein would have addressed a broader range and some of the more politically charged regulations issued by the Obama administration.
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on March 14, 2015
great book!
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on June 27, 2013
I like the conceptual approach and the manner in which the author demonstrated application of a 'simpler' to all manner of regulation and action - BUT, I did not like the style of writing - should have been simpler in language, with better and more llustration of actions and changes that unfolded as a result of efforts to simplify and nudge. Real stories like the triangle and plate would have been great addition. Overall, should be read by public servants across the world.
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on January 1, 2015
Excelent!
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on September 20, 2013
You might consider reading Thaler and Sunstein, Nudge, before going through this book. Basically, this is a follow-up that uses Sunstein's experience in government and the policy initiatives that have occurred of the "nudge" form, to lay down some principles of efficient government.

Sunstein is a brilliant intellectual and a fine writer who commands a broad range of exptert knowledge, but always presents issues in a lucid, straightforward manner. The book is a pleasure to read, and there are insights on every page.

Sunstein tells us that there are three main principles that he has learned. First, the experts that make regulations and laws should use cost-benefit analysis, all the science possible, and deliberate extensively. Special interests should be listened to for advice as how best to do this, but their desires should play no role in decision-making. Second, the public should be presented with simple choices that require no extensive deliberation, but people should have the freedom to reject the "default" choice if they so desire. Third, policy and regulation-makers should listen to the public because people often have ideas and information that the higher-ups do not have, and they many have preferences that decision-makers have not thought of.

If only all public servants had Sunstein's intelligence and moral character!
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on July 19, 2013
The experience of the author may be used or made as a model for others to follow in addressing red tape in their respective governments. The more requirements and signatures, the more delays and petty graft we may encounter.
Simpler, the future of governments, may lead us to make our government smaller, and privatize and simplify our daily lives.
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