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Sin City
Format: DVD|Change
Price:$13.95+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on October 6, 2012
>>> The header of this product is listed as DVD for some reason, despite being a review of a BD purchased via Amazon. Go Figure. >>>

Frank Miller is a favourite of mine, so I am pretty biased. The books the film is based upon cannot in the strictest term be called 'comics'. But this is heaped into the category of 'comic book film'. And you know what, for some reason that doesn't bother me.

Miller, who has always been known for shaking up our perceptions on the definitions of what can be expected in the comic book medium, stuck gold with this solid serialized title. With this film, director Robert Rodriguez redefined what a comic movie could be. And with this version of the BD, they both have redefined the comic book home experience.

Packed with featurettes, a sharp 5.1 soundtrack, snarky and witty commentary, and some 20 minutes of additional movie, there's not much to not like about Sin City at all. Hell, Rodriguez even puts a favourite recipe (apparently one that helped him get through the filming process) in the mix, a simple breakfast taco with homemade attentions- and I tried it; it is a simply divine way to spice up an early morning. How many other BDs, let alone DVDs, give you THAT kind of bonus features?

We know the count. Sin City was a highly regarded "neo-noir" TPB series and a highly praised film. Awards, all-star ensemble cast, lots of action, strong and sexy women, lots of action, gore, and lots of action. Frankly, if you are a fan of gritty comics at all and have no knowledge of Sin City and do not own a BD player... well, there's a good suggestion for your first two purchases.

It's dark, twisted, violent, and quite possibly one of my favourite films of all time.
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The nights are cloudy, the alleys are dark, the men are dangerous, bars are smoky and femmes are fatale. "Sin City" is a thing of dark, bloody beauty.

It certainly says something if a graphic novel author helps out with a movie... especially if that creator swore he'd never let it be adapted. That is only one of the things that makes "Sin City," the adaptation of Frank Miller's comic, such a fascinating film.

"Sin City" is actually made up of three stories: In the depths of Basin (Sin) City, scarred hulk Marv (Mickey Rourke) sleeps with a beautiful prostitute, Goldie (Jaime King), only to find her dead beside him the next morning. Enraged, he goes on a killing spree to find her murderer, and learns that sinister cannibal Kevin (Elijah Wood) is responsible. But there's a powerful figure behind Kevin, who calls the shots.

Elsewhere in Sin City, Dwight (Clive Owen) does his best to defend Gail (Rosario Dawson) and the other Old Town prostitutes. But when Dwight kills a crooked cop, he has to somehow cover up the crime. And Hartigan (Bruce Willis), a cop with a failing heart, goes out of his job with a bang: He rescues little Nancy Callahan from a child molester who happens to be a senator's son. Hartigan is jailed, and when he gets out, he finds that Nancy (Jessica Alba) has grown into a lasso-twirling stripper. But the senator's son -- nicknamed Yellow Bastard -- is still after her.

"Sin City" is one of those few comic book adaptations that doesn't seem... well, cartoonish. Sure, it's the very image of noir, but the grim tone and grey characters are very real. It's not a movie for the fainthearted, but whoever enjoys the films of Quentin Tarantino (who directed one scene here) will surely be blown away.

Like "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow," this film is done almost entirely digitally. But unlike "Sky Captain," it has substance as well as style. All the sets and props are done with computers, and nearly everything is in black and white. Here and there we get a splash of colour -- red lipstick and matching dress, Yellow Bastard's face, green eyes.

The contents of three "Sin City" comic books are interwoven here, and Rodriguez is constantly faithful: A lot of these shots could have been lifted straight from the comic's pages. He also preserves the stark, black-and-white style that the graphic novels are known for. You can't get much more faithful than that.

"Sin City" is not quite a "Kill Bill" bloodfest, though -- surprisingly, this brutal movie has a dark sense of chivalry. Each story is about an outcast man defending a woman's honor, safety, or memory, even if he sacrifices himself in the process. "Sin City" wears its heart on its sleeve, even if that sleeve is bloodstained and torn.

Most of the actors do wonderful jobs -- Owen's dark photographer, Rourke's scarred strongman, Stahl's revolting Yellow Bastard, and Alba's surprisingly sweet stripper. Only a few, like Brittany Murphy, have lackluster performances. But perhaps the most memorable performances come from Bruce Willis and Elijah Wood. Willis plays his aging cop role with unusual grace, even when shooting the genitals off Yellow Bastard. And Wood plays Kevin with both creepy evil and spiritual ecstacy... all without saying a word.

"Sin City" is a remarkable, bleak, intense movie -- a halfway point between Tarantino and Raymond Chandler. An outstanding piece of work.
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on December 21, 2017
This is a great adaptation of the graphic novel. It's full of well-known actors and actresses who put in gritty performances. The action is stylized and over-the-top at times-- just what you'd expect from a violent comic book setting. With a lot of black and white, the moments of color are all the more stunning. This is a very entertaining movie.
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VINE VOICEon August 28, 2005
So hungry I am for originality. So hungry I am for filmmakers with a unique vision and the know-how to give us something new and MEMORABLE!!!!! SO HUNGRY I AM FOR MORE SIN CITY!!!!!

Thank you, thank you, thank you Frank Miller, Robert Rodriquez, Quentin Tarantino and everyone else who had anything to do with this BEAUTIFUL film. Beautiful? Yes! It is. Violent. Grisly. But, beautifully shot and designed. From the rain, to the snow, to the faces, to the colors and yes... the blood.

All who were involved with Sin City earned some serious brownie points with me because you gave us what we all have been hungry for, for so long. You took us and our imaginations to a new place. You told us stories that pulled no punches and kept us on our toes.

In a slew of Non-original, cookie-cutter, same old same old films, mixed with all the lack of new idea remakes, SIN CITY proved to me that the film business still has a pulse.

Sin City, with a phenominal cast (Mickey Rourke may have saved his career here), delivered on a phenominal level. With its 60s style and Humphrey Bogartish delivery, it packed a tremendous punch of creativity, design, grit and grime.

With it's beautiful black and white colors and the occasional splash of red, it moves like a painting... with 3 intertwining stories of the inhabitants of Sin City. The low, the lower and the even lower... with an occassional splash of righteousnous.

Yet, after watching Sin City, I couldn't help thinking that there were so many more stories to be told. I want to see more, and I want to read Frank Miller's books now. I want to see Senator Roarke get what he deserves!! He has to!

This movie is great. It really is. If anything, even if you don't like violence, hitting the play button, YOU WILL see something new, original and CREATIVE.

Finally... I'm only giving it 4 stars because the DVD is sorta bare bones... Surely, the special edition will be coming soon! Hopefully!
4 people found this helpful
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The nights are cloudy, the alleys are dark, the men are dangerous, bars are smoky and femmes are fatale. "Sin City" is a thing of dark, bloody beauty.

It certainly says something if a graphic novel author helps out with a movie... especially if that creator swore he'd never let it be adapted. That is only one of the things that makes "Sin City," the adaptation of Frank Miller's comic, such a fascinating film.

"Sin City" is actually made up of three stories: In the depths of Basin (Sin) City, scarred hulk Marv (Mickey Rourke) sleeps with a beautiful prostitute, Goldie (Jaime King), only to find her dead beside him the next morning. Enraged, he goes on a killing spree to find her murderer, and learns that sinister cannibal Kevin (Elijah Wood) is responsible. But there's a powerful figure behind Kevin, who calls the shots.

Elsewhere in Sin City, Dwight (Clive Owen) does his best to defend Gail (Rosario Dawson) and the other Old Town prostitutes. But when Dwight kills a crooked cop, he has to somehow cover up the crime. And Hartigan (Bruce Willis), a cop with a failing heart, goes out of his job with a bang: He rescues little Nancy Callahan from a child molester who happens to be a senator's son. Hartigan is jailed, and when he gets out, he finds that Nancy (Jessica Alba) has grown into a lasso-twirling stripper. But the senator's son -- nicknamed Yellow Bastard -- is still after her.

"Sin City" is one of those few comic book adaptations that doesn't seem... well, cartoonish. Sure, it's the very image of noir, but the grim tone and grey characters are very real. It's not a movie for the fainthearted, but whoever enjoys the films of Quentin Tarantino (who directed one scene here) will surely be blown away.

Like "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow," this film is done almost entirely digitally. But unlike "Sky Captain," it has substance as well as style. All the sets and props are done with computers, and nearly everything is in black and white. Here and there we get a splash of colour -- red lipstick and matching dress, Yellow Bastard's face, green eyes.

The contents of three "Sin City" comic books are interwoven here, and Rodriguez is constantly faithful: A lot of these shots could have been lifted straight from the comic's pages. He also preserves the stark, black-and-white style that the graphic novels are known for. You can't get much more faithful than that.

"Sin City" is not quite a "Kill Bill" bloodfest, though -- surprisingly, this brutal movie has a dark sense of chivalry. Each story is about an outcast man defending a woman's honor, safety, or memory, even if he sacrifices himself in the process. "Sin City" wears its heart on its sleeve, even if that sleeve is bloodstained and torn.

Most of the actors do wonderful jobs -- Owen's dark photographer, Rourke's scarred strongman, Stahl's revolting Yellow Bastard, and Alba's surprisingly sweet stripper. Only a few, like Brittany Murphy, have lackluster performances. But perhaps the most memorable performances come from Bruce Willis and Elijah Wood. Willis plays his aging cop role with unusual grace, even when shooting the genitals off Yellow Bastard. And Wood plays Kevin with both creepy evil and spiritual ecstacy. All without saying a word.

"Sin City" is a remarkable, bleak, intense movie -- a halfway point between Tarantino and Raymond Chandler. Outstanding.
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"Frank Miller's Sin City" is a world where the heroes can take a whole series of punches as well as deliver them, where justice has nothing to do with either mercy or the cops, and the system is crooked from top down to pretty near the bottom of the barrel. The dames are still worth dying for and some of them might even be angels or goddesses, but others can defend themselves quite well without anyone's help. Still, this is a world where protecting women is hard-wired into the psyches of guys like John Hartigan (Bruce Willis), Marv (Mickey Rourke), and Dwight (Clive Owen). If you fail to protect a dame, then somebody has to pay and in a way that will make the scum bucket think Hell is heaven when you finally let them go straight to there. This movie is rated R for "sustained strong stylized violence, nudity and sexual content including dialogue," but that is most assuredly an R that is a whole lot closer to NC-17 than it is to PG-13.

I am not particularly happy that when I bought "Frank Miller's Sin City" on DVD as soon as it came out that it was the stripped down version and that a few months later, in time for Christmas no less, we finally get the "Recut, Extended, Unrated" DVD set. But studios are making money off of this double-dipping and if I could hold off for years on "Titanic" I should have been able to do the same thing with this one, so shame on me. But the good news is that (a) I did not have to pay for the upgrade and (b) the difference between the two DVDs, without the discount, is only ten bucks and you will more than get your money's worth here because to ease our collective pain Robert Rodriguez made sure that this 2-disc set goes the extra mile. That is clear as soon as you open up the box and discover it includes a mini-version of Frank Miller's "The Hard Goodbye" (my "mini" I mean the book is slightly larger than the size of a paperback novel). This is a good choice not only because it is the first "Sin City" graphic novel, but also because it is about Marv and as Marv Mickey Rourke steals this movie from Bruce Willis and the rest. So already you have account for a good chuck of the extra ten dollars you are spending and then we get to the super-loaded two DVDs.

Disc 1 contains the original theatrical release (uncut, unextended, rated). Your other "Sin City" DVD is made superfluous because this has three commentary tracks: co-directors Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller talking primarily about working with the actors; Rodriguez and special guest director Quentin Tarantino (eventually) talking more about the technical aspects of the film; and an audio track of the reaction of an audience in Austin to a screening of the film. The featurettes cover how Frank Miller was convinced to make the film, getting Tarantino to play with shooting a film digitally, and then separate looks at the cars, props, special effects and costumes of the film. There is then a "Sin-Chroni-City" interactive game that looks at how the three novels that make up the first "Sin City" movie cross each other, and the teaser and theatrical trailers. The two directors having a conversation while screening the film is the best of the extras on this disc, simply because I like the stories of the production a bit more than the details on how the film was made, but both are excellent commentary tracks.

Disc 2 offers the recut and extended theatrical release and it is not the deleted scenes being worked back in for the "extended" part that matters here but rather the "recut" part. That is because Rodriguez has recut the movie into the three graphic novels, "The Hard Goodbye," "The Big Fat Kill," and "That Yellow Bastard," along with the short story "The Customer Is Always Right" from "Babe Wore Red" and the epilogue Rodriguez and Miller came up with for the end of the film. With the movie broken up this way it is even easier for you to watch a "chapter" with Miller's graphic novel in front of you to see the extent to which they actually did shoot the book on this film. Of course the special features on this disc include new installments of Rodriguez's 15-Minute Film School and 10-Minute Cooking School (breakfast tacos). There is also a performance by Bruce Willis with a band at the "'Sin City' Live" cast and crew party at Antones filmed by Rodriguez with the digital camera. For cinema buffs the two treats are the movie in high-speed green screen, so you can see how they actually shot everything (tip of the hat to Rodriguez for protecting his cast on the brief nudity in this version), and a 14-minute uninterrupted take from Tarantino's segment (Dwight and Jackie Boy in the car on the way to the tar pits) that allows a great look at how actors and directors work when shooting digitally.

I already thought "Frank Miller's Sin City" was a five-star movie that not only sets the standard for what film noir will be in the 21st century but also advances the cause of digital filmmaker. That it brings Miller's characters and story to life while remaining faithful to his artistic style is a bonus for those whose introduction to "Sin City" was the graphic novels, but that was what Miller and wanted and what Rodriguez delivered with his little test run. If you held out on getting this movie on DVD until the special features version was available it was well worth your wait, and if you have been duped into giving the studio even more of your money for this upgrade you will at least have the satisfaction of knowing that Rodriguez delivered for you as well.
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on August 28, 2017
At first glance you are not going to enjoy this mash up of characters and events but your drawn to them more and more. Full of moments that clearly though not believable, are at the same time enjoyable to watch. Seeing top talent mesh together along with moody scenes and crisp dialogue make it both a fun flick to have and to pull out form time to time
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on June 30, 2016
Pretty good lots of cross over between different character. This is not for everyone it is a bit dark but well done. I will not go over what a lot of other reviewers have already told you about the film. But do remember this is based off a graphic novel so you have to go into it with a little lea way as to why this guy can get shot half a dozen times and live. Other than that great move well done and would recommend.
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on March 30, 2014
I have never seen a movie like this one, comic noir. This is my first, and I thought it was great. The movie is based on somesome novels from Frank Miller. I have never heard of him, but I loved how this movie is made. It is primarily made black and white, with a little color. It consists of four different stories; and with a killer cast this movie will please the toughest critics. It is definitly for the comic lovers; but for those that like a varity of movies, you will be pleased with this one also.

THX,
Kris L. CocKayne
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First off, the visual imagery in this film is creative, true to the graphic novels, and powerful. Second, they used Mickey Rourke perfectly with the makeup and his build, he was perfect to play the character of Marv. True, the violence in this film is extreme, but that is a major component of what the graphic novel and the storyteller were attempting to convey - and the film stayed true to that. The use of color in some scenes was also visually powerful. I would very much recommend this film for those who are interested in this genre (though I honestly wouldn't know how to classify this one, other than action-drama). For fans of Jessica Alba, well, you won't be disappointed, either...

Just by way of background, and while other reviewers seems to prefer to reveal much of the story and plot, I think that sort of ruins the film in many cases. So, you'll want to look for other reviews and reviewers if that is what you are looking for...
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