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Sinbad And The Eye Of The Tiger 1977

G CC

The most ambitious of Ray Harryhausen's fabled Sinbad trilogy. When an evil sorceress turns a handsome prince into a baboon, Sinbad (Patrick Wayne) sets sail on a dangerous quest to break the witch'sspell. Co-starring Jane Seymour.

Starring:
Patrick Wayne, Taryn Power
Runtime:
1 hour, 52 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Drama, Adventure, Action, Kids & Family
Director Sam Wanamaker
Starring Patrick Wayne, Taryn Power
Supporting actors Margaret Whiting, Jane Seymour, Patrick Troughton, Kurt Christian, Nadim Sawalha, Damien Thomas, Bruno Barnabe, Bernard Kay, Salami Coker, David Sterne, Peter Mayhew
Studio Columbia Pictures
MPAA rating G (General Audience)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
The third of Ray Harryhausen's Sinbad films has gotten a bad rap over the years for Beverly Cross' script (which Harryhausen co-authored) and some of the performances, notably Patrick Wayne as Sinbad. The rap is largely unfair, for the film is quite entertaining, though admittedly flawed (mostly because of Sam Wanamaker's choppy direction), thanks to a strong cast and Ray Harryhausen's always-pleasing animation.
The story revolves around Kassim, the caliph of Baghdad, who mysteriously disappears around the time of his coronation. Sinbad, arriving in Baghdad both to sell cargo and also to see the caliph's sister (Jane Seymour, who here plays a princess and still looks like one 22 years later), is drawn into a trap by Rafi (Kurt Christian) and his evil mother, the witch Zenobia (Margaret Whiting). Barely escaping an attack by three sword-wielding fire mutants (Harryhausen's stop-motion swordfights always seemed to get better with each passing film), Sinbad finds Kassim's sister and a baboon - Kassim, turned into such by Zenobia.
To break Zenobia's spell, Sinbad and crew enlist a wizard, Master Malanthius and his daughter Dione (Taryn Power), and must sail for Hyperborea, a land at the North Pole immune to the polar region's frost. But Zenobia and Rafi are following, aided by a mechanical beast known as Minaton.
This film features quite a bit of character animation by Harryhausen. His monsters have always had distinct personalities - only Harryhausen could make a rampaging Allosaur like Gwangi villainous and completely sympathetic all at once - but here he imbues them with ever greater warmth, not only in the baboon Kassim (the most chilling scene comes when the animated Baboon sees himself in a mirror, and is driven to grief.
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Format: VHS Tape
well, the first time I saw 'Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger', I was 5 years old, home from school watching afternoon television with the smell of Vicks in my nose...and let me tell you, it really added to the already amazing special effects of this movie. I would highly recommend it... not only does it have the devastatingly beautiful young Jane Seymour, but Sinbad is quite dashing, and the monsters and scenarios are genuinely intriguing. The animation, especially on the Tiger and in the Tiger/Cyclops-monster battle scene is amazing for its time, and the man who created it must have had the patience of a saint. The movie is worth watching just for its old-style animation effects alone. Beleive me, the images of it come back in your dreams.
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Format: DVD
While it's definitely not the best Ray Harryhausen "Sinbad" adventure, it's sure does stand tall against a lot of its modern competition. Flip on any SciFi Channel or network television remake of any of the wonderful Sinbad adventures, and you'll find that "Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger" is a whole lot more fun. It features wonderful, over-the-top acting and camp from Margaret Whiting as the evil Zenobia and the always excellent Patrick Troughton (the classic "Doctor Who") as the wise and wiley Melanthius. It also features excellent stop-motion animation from the godfather of modern special effects, Ray Harryhausen.

In this adventure, Sinbad (Patrick Wayne, the Duke's boy) and company take port in Charak, where Princess Farah (Jane Seymour) is distressed over the condition of her brother, Kassim, who has been turned into a baboon by stepmother and local witch (in more ways than one) Zenobia. You see, in order for Sinbad and Farah to get married, the Caliph has to bless their union. The only problem is that the would-be Caliph, Kassim, is unable to do so because of his primate problem. With no one to properly take the throne, Zenobia has plans to put her son in power and rule the kingdom through him.

In order to save both Kassim and their love for one another, Sinbad, Farah, and Sinbad's crew set off to find the old mystic, Melanthius. He seems to be the only person capable of helping them. To stop Sinbad, though, Zenobia and her son animate a bronze Minaton (think Minotaur but really shiny) to row their own boat in pursuit. After finding Melanthius and his beautiful daughter, Dione (Taryn Power), the group sets out to find a mysterious pyramid that can save Kassim's life.
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Format: Blu-ray
The last in Ray Harryhausen's trilogy of Sinbad movies, "Sinbad and The Eye of The Tiger" may be a lesser entry in the series but it's still a fine family flick and a lot of fun to watch. The negatives include Patrick Wayne as Sinbad who looks the part but is as wooden and stiff as the figurehead that came to life the preceding film (and the best in the trilogy IMHO) "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad". Nevertheless, Wayne has the physicality and swagger necessary for the role.

SPOILERS:

Sinbad docks at Charak and seeks the permission from Prince Kassim to marry Kassim's sister, Princess Farah (Jane Seymour)(how many princesses is he going to marry?). He is immediately attacked by demonic ghouls (which reminds me of the Selenites from "First Men in the Moon"--possibly Harryhausen used the same armature for the ghouls here) and, once inside the city, discovers that Kassim has been cursed by his wicked step-mother Zenobia (Margaret Whiting) turning him into a baboon prior to being crowned caliph.

Sinbad takes to the sea once again this time to find the Greek alchemist Melanthius (Patrick Troughton--the second Dr. Who alumni to appear in a Harryhausen film) who can cure Kassim. Zenobia and her son (who she hopes to have crowned as caliph) race to stop Sinbad with their ship powered by a golden minotar that Zenobia has brought to life.

END OF SPOILERS:

"Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger" met with mixed critical reaction after the successful "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad" (also available on Blu-ray from Twilight Time) and while "Tiger" did well at the box office, it failed to reach the heights of "Golden". Harryhausen admitted that the production was rushed and that it wasn't his best work.
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