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Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee Hardcover – June 8, 2009

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"The Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee will appeal to all who hold an interest in the history of the Civil War and its effects, and especially to readers from the two states under examination. It will remain current as long as that interest lasts."―Charles P. Roland, Alumni Professor of History Emeritus, University of Kentucky"

"This outstanding collection of essays offers a rich and comprehensive picture of the experience of Tennesseans and Kentuckians during the tumultuous 1860s. Readers will find it not only wonderfully informative, but also fascinating."―Stephen V. Ash, author of A Year in the South: 1865"

"Sister States, Enemy States: The Civil War In Kentucky and Tennessee

"Comprised of a good mix of familiar and fresh subjects and analyses penned by specialist scholars well selected for the task, this is an important contribution to the western theater Civil War literature."―Civil War Books and Authors"

"Sister States, Enemy States is recommended to those interested in the Civil War, Tennessee and Kentucky."―Oklahoman"

"This book will be worthwhile for anyone interested in the wartime experiences of Kentucky and Tennessee, but it will be of special interest to those who had ancestors living here during that time." ―Kentucky Ancestors"

"Though the two adjacent states share the same historical roots and cultures, the Civil War constituted a break that could not be more profound, as Tennessee joined the Confederacy and Kentucky joined the Union." ―Book News"

"Civil War-era scholars and enthusiasts alike will find the original essays covering an often overlooked region a delight, and the historical community at large will benefit from the social, economic, and political perspectives offered by this well-edited volume."―Arkansas Review"

"Students who are interested in the field can gain a great deal of information in a concise manner that will serve as a springboard for further research. It is perhaps this that is the greatest contribution of the book. It is a must-have work for students and scholars of the Civil War and Reconstruction in the Western Theater."―Register of the Kentucky Historical Society"

"Anyone interested in Kentucky and Tennessee in the Civil War era will enjoy this book. The editors have done a superb job of recruiting authors and assembling good, in some cases outstanding, essays."―Journal of American History"

"All in all, this is great tour-de-force for those interested in Kentucky and Tennessee history or in the political and social values that impacted those living in 1860 and continue to shape America today."―Journal of America's Military Past"

"A very good book on the life of the two states during the Civil War, and particularly on the dynamics of secession."―Strategy Page"

"This collection brings together sixteen essays by leading scholars on the Civil War in Kentucky and Tennessee. It sheds much new light on a region that―while recognized as critically significant during the mid-nineteenth century―is often overlooked in the historiography."―Journal of Southern History"

"The essays in Sister States, Enemy States persuasively demonstrate that the Civil War was fought not among well-defined classes in the East, but inside the households and farmsteads of the economically hybrid western Upper South. This volume is a must for anyone interested in East Tennessee and in the Civil War in general."―Journal of East Tennessee History"

"A personal and very readable book that increases our understanding of everyday life during an extraordinary event." ―TOCWOC blog"―

About the Author

Kent T. Dollar is assistant professor of history at Tennessee Technological University and author of Soldiers of the Cross: Confederate Soldier-Christians and the Impact of War on their Faith. Larry H. Whiteaker is professor emeritus of history at Tennessee Technological University and author of The Individual and Society in America. W. Calvin Dickinson is professor emeritus of history at Tennessee Technological University and coauthor of Tennessee Tales the Textbooks Don't Tell
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky (June 8, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813125413
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813125411
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,407,570 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Kentucky and Tennessee are sister states that formed a pivotal region in the Civil War. Both states were fiercely divided in loyalty "to the Union flag of Washington, Jefferson, and Andrew Jackson" and attachment to Southern nationalism. The majority of Tennesseans reluctantly sided with the Confederacy while the majority of Kentuckians reluctantly sided with the Union, making these sister states enemies.

The course of the war was driven by their decisions. If Kentucky had joined with Tennessee in formally seceding the Confederacy may have been unconquerable. If Tennessee had remained in the Union with Kentucky the Confederacy may have been defeated at an early date. But the states went separate ways, making for a costly and prolonged war. Historians have asked, "Why DID these sister states choose opposing sides?"

The answer at the highest level would be something like "Tennessee went with the Confederacy because it had a high proportion of slavery-bound interests. Kentucky stayed in the Union because its diversified economy had fewer slaves and because its population centers were close to the Ohio River and therefore within easy reach of Federal forces."

However, SISTER STATES, ENEMY STATES does NOT answer the question on that level. It answers it on an individual level by letting us see the events through the eyes of the Kentuckians and Tennesseans who lived through the Civil War. These are fascinating stories, among them:

* The antics of the rabid Tennessee Unionist William Brownlow, an irascible mud-slinging journalist of the lowest kind whose devotion to the Union and gut-hatred of Confederates rallied Unionists into defiance and even armed resistance against Confederate authority in East Tennessee.
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Format: Paperback
For many states, the decision on secession was not an easy one. With strong ties in both directions, the people held split loyalties creating questions with no easy answers. Even after making the decision or having it made for them, problems defying solutions existed. Kentucky and Tennessee went through a particularly difficult time during the Civil War. One seceded and fought with the Confederacy and the other waited to secede after the war ended.
Collections of essays can be difficult reading unless the editors are careful. Including to wide a range of opinions or trying to cover to much may weaken the book. The editors have avoided these traps producing a cohesive work that captures the diverse experiences of these two states. Organized into sections on secession, the experience of war and war's aftermath we gain a fuller understanding of events. Each section contains five or six essays on an issue or an individual. The editors Introduction and Afterword set the stage and sum up our reading.
Marion B. Lucas provides a look at Kentucky's Black population in "Freedom is Better than Slavery". Which ties into "After the Horror", B. Franklin Cooling's look at Kentucky after the war. This is just one example of how different essays reinforce each other. More is made of the day-to-day war than the movements of armies or the big battles. The book's emphasis is on bushwhackers, burnt homes and occupation not on Shiloh or Perryville. This excellent idea makes for a personal and very readable book that increases our understanding of everyday life during an extraordinary event.
Each essay has notes. Most have illustrations. There is a full index and information on the contributors. The paperback has 392 pages and 368 of these pages are text.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For the Tennessee and Kentucky history buffs who love the Civil War, this compilation is extremely well researched and provides a collage of pieces that are compiled into a compelling piece of history of this era for Tennesseans and Kentuckians. Fascinating writing for the most part, and each author obviously knows his stuff. Not an easy read, but a substantive read.
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