Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy New
$23.46
Qty:1
  • List Price: $34.95
  • Save: $11.49 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Six Yogas of Naropa: ... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Six Yogas of Naropa: Tsongkhapa's Commentary Entitled A Book of Three Inspirations: A Treatise on the Stages of Training in the Profound Path of Naro's Six Dharmas Paperback – October 4, 2005

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.46
$18.08 $18.07

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$23.46 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Six Yogas of Naropa: Tsongkhapa's Commentary Entitled A Book of Three Inspirations: A Treatise on the Stages of Training in the Profound Path of Naro's Six Dharmas
  • +
  • The Practice of the Six Yogas of Naropa
  • +
  • The Bliss of Inner Fire: Heart Practice of the Six Yogas of Naropa
Total price: $54.14
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Another example of Mullin's brilliance as a translator and interpreter of Tibetan tantricism."—Tibet Journal

"A veritable feast containing teachings that for centuries have been kept secret but that give one a clear sense of the enormous possibilities on the spiritual path."—Quest Magazine

"Glenn's study of the history, substance, and philosophical legacy of the Six Yogas of Naropa together with his translations of Tsongkhapa's treatise provides an invaluable guide to this tradition."—Buddhism Now

From the Publisher

Anyone who has read more than a few books on Tibetan Buddhism will have encountered a reference to the Naro Choe Druk (Tib. na ro'i chos drug), a phrase that renders literally as "Naro's Six Dharmas," but is more often encountered in English translation as "the Six Yogas of Naropa." These six-inner heat, illusory body, clear light, consciousness transference, forceful projection, and the bardo yoga-represent one of the most popular Tibetan Buddhist presentations of yogic technology to come from India to the Land of Snows. The Tibetan word choe (Tib. chos) in the expression Naro Choe Druk is a translation"'of the Sanskrit term dharma, which means" doctrine," "teaching," "instruction" or "yogic training." Druk means" six." Thus the system can be called Six Dharmas, Six Doctrines, or Six Yogas. I generally use "the Six Yogas of Naropa," or simply "the Six Yogas," because these are the forms best known to Western readers. Occasionally I resort to the more literal "Naro's Six Dharmas," although whenever I do so I enclose the phrase in quotation marks in order to indicate that I am honoring the Tibetan form of the name, Naro Choe Druk. Tibetan literature randomly refers to the illustrious Indian Buddhist master after whom this tradition is named as Naro, Naropa, and Naropada (born 1016). Naropa was a disciple of the Indian mahasiddha Tilopa (b. 988). The lineages that Naropa gave to his Tibetan lay-disciple Marpa Lotsawa (lit. "Marpa Translator"; b. 1012), especially that of the Six Yo gas, came to pervade thousands of monasteries and hermitages throughout Central Asia, regardless of sect. This is certainly true within all the Sarmai Choeluk, or "New Schools, such as the Kadampa, Kargyupa, Sakyapa, Jonangpa and Gelukpa. In addition, the Six Yogas have also gradually become absorbed into most the Nyingma Choeluk, or "Older Schools." The treatise on the system written by Tsongkhapa the Great (1357-1419)-A Book of Three Inspirations: A Treatise on the Stages of Training in the Profound Path of Naro's Six Dharmas – is regarded as one of the finest on the subject to come out of the Land of Snows. Lama Tsongkhapa was the forefather of the Gelukpa school (Tib. dGe 'lugs; lit.. "Order of Excellence"), which quickly swept across Centrall Asia and became the largest single school of tantric Buddhism. He was also the guru of the First Dalai Lama (b. 1391). His treatise has served as the fundamental guide to the system of the Six Yogas of Naropa as practiced in the more than three thousand Gelukpa monasteries, nunneries and hermitages across Central Asia over the past five-and-a half centuries. The Gelukpa lineage came down over the generations to the present day. The principal transmission holder, when I arrived in India in 1972, was Kyabjey Trijang Rinpochey, the Junior Tutor of His Holiness the DalaiLama. He in turn passed it to numerous disciples. I was in Dharamsala in 1973 when Kyabjey Rinpochey delivered his last transmission on Naropa's Six Yogas. At the time I was studying Tibetan language, philosophy and meditation at the Buddhist Studies Program initiated by H. H. the Dalai Lama as part of the activities of his recently established Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala. A few months into the program it was announced that the Junior Tutor to His Holiness, the very venerable and very elderly Kyabjey Trijang Rinpochey, would be giving a teaching in the museum room, the largest space in the building. The subject would be the Six Yogas of Naropa, and the recipients would be a large group of Tibetan yogis, hermits, monks and nuns. We Westerners couldn't attend, but if we liked we could sit in an adjoining room and listen through the sound system. The Dalai Lama's Junior Tutor was considered to be one of the greatest living masters to come out of Tibet, and was regarded as a living buddha by the Tibetan community. News of his discourse had travelled throughout the refugee communities of India and Nepal and great lamas began to roll into town from all directions. One monk who was pointed out to me was said to have spent more than forty years in meditation in the mountains. There were dozens of others with twenty or more years of solitary retreat under their belts.

Rinpochey spoke six hours a day for many, many days, using the text of Lama Tsongkhapa as his focus. One day one of the yogis coming out of the room at the end of the session looked at me and said, "Really what a Buddha he is!" When this great lama passed away a few years later, the Tibetan spiritual community mourned.the loss of one of the last of the super-greats to come out of Tibet. When I think back twenty-two years ago to the faces in the front couple of rows at that teaching, many of them have today come to rank among the foremost lamas in the Gelukpa school.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Snow Lion; annotated edition edition (October 4, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559392347
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559392341
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #785,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Those fairly familiar with the (steadily growing) list of Tibetan Buddhist works in English translation may need to know only that this is a new release, with an altered title and change of cover art, of Snow Lion's 1996 volume of "Tsongkhapa's Six Yogas of Naropa," translated with a helpful introduction and useful notes by Glenn H. Mullin. If you belong to that group, and have that edition, you won't need this printing, which is apparently unchanged in any other way. (Including the omission of a Western-language bibliography; most of what is needed can be dug out of the notes, but the effort shouldn't be necessary. And, as in too many Snow Lion volumes, there is still no index.) But if you are, and DON'T have a copy, having it readily available again may be welcome news -- it was to me. Even if the full new title, "The Six Yogas of Naropa: Tsongkhapa's Commentary entitled A Book of Three Inspirations: A Treatise on the Stages of Training in the Profound Path of Naro's Six Dharmas Commonly Referred to as The Three Inspirations," is a bit of a mouthful.

However, it does give fair warning that this is anything but a how-to manual; it is a theoretical work on techniques for very advanced students of yoga, and for initiates in tantric yoga to boot. Topics covered include production of mystical heat, sleep and dream yogas, soul-projection, and after-death experiences. Mullin supplies explanations of the conceptual background, often providing fairly extended quotations from other Tibetan works, including commentaries to Tsongkhapa. Mullin's 1997 companion volume, "Readings on the Six Yogas of Naropa," is currently still in print under its original title. A shorter volume, it contains earlier and later treatments, from India and Tibet, including a supplementary text by Tsongkhapa himself.
Read more ›
1 Comment 69 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I've been studying meditation systems for more than two decades, yet I'm fairly new to Tibetan Buddhist studies. "Tsongkhapa's..." solves a dilemma that I've seen crop up in other systems, that I've seen no clearer resolution to than in this keystone Tibetan text. The "dilemma" that I referred to is the conflict and bridge between systems that emphasize

1) energy cultivation,

2) emptiness/absolute schools or

3) some mix of both but without a clear bridge.

Emptiness schools often critique energetic schools for merely getting caught in other layers of cyclic existence (and worse, creating intense karma in those layers). Yet emptiness schools often don't admit the valid energetic part of the path.

The first yoga of the six, the crux and foundation of this 6-yoga system, explains steps that produce bliss - and resolve it into emptiness. This resolution occurs within the mysterious deep-centers, who reside along - and whose vitality is integrated through - the central channel.

The Seventh Dalai Lama wrote verse about the 6 yoga system, whose 1st paragraph follows. Much of it is of specific cultural reference, but the 4th and 7th lines speak to general theory:

"Namo guru daka dakini yeh!

O all-pervading Heruka and your mandala of bliss,

O Tilopa, also known as the sublimely wise Jnanabhadra

Who took the insight of ecstasy and void to its limits,

And Naropa, an emodiment of Chakrasamvara:

I request you, bestow blessings, that we may achive

The wisdom of ecstasy and void conjoined."

- (from page 96 of the book)

This text has tremendous implications for the classic theological dilemmas re: sensation.

(The above is my pasted review of the previous edition of this book, which still holds for this.)
Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you want to learn more about Tibetan spirituality, you need to read this book. You'll also need to read it multiple times, as there will be information you'll get with each reading. This book is especially important if you are doing these spiritual practices as it will provide information that will help you refine those practices. I found the introduction helpful as well in terms of providing cultural context to how these practices are passed on. I do recommend multiple readings as some things may not click in place the first time, and I also recommend reading other books and doing the practices to get further insights into this work.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the translators commentary on the Great Tsongkapa's book. Our translator provides only small snippets of the translated text; mostly he provides commentary of the text. It would be great if the translated text in its entirety were included somewhere in this book, but alas.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed reading this book. It is always nice to be able to read anything by Lama Tsongkapa. As I was reading this book I was amazed at the detailed logical reasoning and valid scriptural citation that Lama Tsongkapa is famous for. I found the section on corpse reanimation quite amusing. I don't think that lineage exists any more. Could come in handy, I suppose!

As I always feel slightly unsure about the precise usage of words in any of the Tibetan translations I have read thus far, I prefer to use Geshe Kelsang Gyatso's Tantric Grounds and Paths: How to Enter, Progress On, and Complete the Vajrayana Path and Clear Light of Bliss : The Practice of Mahamudra in Vajrayana Buddhism as practical instruction as they are written with today's practitioner in mind. Also, Lama Yeshe's The Bliss of Inner Fire: Heart Practice of the Six Yogas of Naropa is similarly written for today's practitioner.

All in all I find this a valuable cross-reference. If you have the appropriate empowerments and a good motivation it would be very worthwhile to receive teachings on The Six Yogas from a qualified Vajrayana master in order to get the blessing lineage of these practices into your mindstream.
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Six Yogas of Naropa: Tsongkhapa's Commentary Entitled A Book of Three Inspirations: A Treatise on the Stages of Training in the Profound Path of Naro's Six Dharmas
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Six Yogas of Naropa: Tsongkhapa's Commentary Entitled A Book of Three Inspirations: A Treatise on the Stages of Training in the Profound Path of Naro's Six Dharmas

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?