Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$5.23
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Skary Childrin and the Carousel of Sorrow Hardcover – August 23, 2011

4.8 out of 5 stars 62 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, August 23, 2011
$29.00 $0.01

Night of the Ninth Dragon (Magic Tree House (R) Merlin Mission) by Mary Pope Osborne
Night of the Ninth Dragon
The highly-anticipated work of Mary Pope Osborne. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Towell tucks violent tempests, maggoty slime, hideous transformations, nightmares, sudden terrors and like atmosphere-building elements into a rousingly melodramatic literary debut." —Kirkus Reviews

"If a studio hasn't already snapped up the rights to a feature film, they would be fools not to do it." —Edge

"A splendidly odd little tale." —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

About the Author

KATY TOWELL is the creator of the Childrin R Skary website. She is also a graphic designer, writer, and illustrator in Los Angeles with dreams of one day being the scary old lady in the house about which all the neighborhood children tell ghost stories. When not doing these things, she collects antiques, strange teas, and carnivorous houseplants, and she plays a little tune on her violin now and again.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Read a Chapter Excerpt
Learn more about Skary Childrin and the Carousel of Sorrow in this chapter excerpt [PDF].

Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 680L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (August 23, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375868593
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375868597
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #665,578 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Carla J. Wollard on August 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Let me just begin by saying that I am not a young adult and I don't have kids but this book is great! I only recently heard about it from an article on Yahoo (or maybe aol). Once I looked up Katy Towell and saw the drawings and animations (which are great fun) I decided to download a sample of the book. I read straight through the sample and had to download to keep going! The story is quirky, spooky, sad, and funny and I found it really engaging. The drawings are totally cool and don't overwhelm the story. I read until 4 a.m. and had to stop only because I couldn't keep my eyes open any longer. It is totally set to be a series and I can't wait to read more! (I also really want a print of her adorable little gorgon with the stone kitty from her website!) I know that I would have totally dug this book at 12 years old and I am no where near that age now - except, perhaps young at heart. A great read.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
In a town where anything new is automatically labeled dangerous, these three girls from Madame Gertrude's School for Girls--Adelaide, Maggie and Beatrice--are the perfect example of why native Widowsburians are so wary of the unfamiliar. Pre-Storm Widowsbury, I imagine, was one of those quaint little towns where everyone knew everyone (and their business), and both people and events had a sort of day-to-day sameness. Even after the Storm, much of that mindset seems to have carried over, so to have these girls--who are new and possess freakish talents--come to town is very unsettling.

Yet despite those qualities, which one might imagine would create an instant bond between the girls, it takes a dangerous outside influence to bring them together. My favorite aspect of the book wasn't necessarily watching the mystery unfold (because thanks to dramatic irony, the reader already has a pretty good idea of what's going on), but rather watching the friendships develop between these girls--and little Steffen, whom I wound up adoring! Factor in their status as outcasts, and now there's an even wider appeal; after all, at some point we've all felt like the underdog, and seeing these kids beat the odds with a whole town against them brings some real satisfaction.

I've followed Katy Towell's work for several years, and even with this shift in style from her other Skary Childrin works (see her website at skary.net), I am still absolutely amazed. She's always been a brilliant artist, and those who know her work already knew she's a great storyteller as well. "Carousel of Sorrow" has proven to be yet another fantastic piece, and I can't wait to see what she comes up with next.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My kids and I are reading this book nightly. Chapters are long and a lot is going on. But so far, they love it. I wouldn't recommend for any readers under 9-10 and any listeners under 8. Plenty of unfamiliar vocabulary so I review the words as I read to my kids. In my house we adore books and movies like Adams Family, Beetlegeuse, Twilight, Edward Scissor Hands- pretty much anything Tim Burton, so this was right up our alley, especially with outcasted children being the main characters. Hope this helps!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found this author by watching her short story flash videos she has on youtube, and when I saw that she had a book, I didn't hesitate in buying it. If you're into horror stories with a little bit of humor thrown in, this is the book for you. The town gives me a creepy vibe whenever I read a passage about it, the characters interest me and I really got concerned about what would happen at the conclusion, which didn't disappoint.
Like I said, if you like horror, you'll love Skary Childrin. If you're not sure, I recommend watching some of her stories she put on youtube, and if you like them, get the book.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The greatest fear craws in the void of unknown.

Lemme just say it all started with a boring rainy night when I was strolling around the all-mighty Youtube, and I ran into this video snapshot in which there's a little girl with two black eyes freakishly different in size. It turned out to be one of Katy Towell's mini-tales, and that particular one was about a girl who was "absolutely forgotten by everyone". An incredible depressing sad story, which only made want more. So I went to her channel and watched "Ida's Luck" and more. After like another 5 vids when I discovered this book trailer, I was totally sold. Six days later - three days delivery and another three for reading - I had already decided Katy was one of the writers that I might follow.

I gotta admit, despite the definite talent of extremely vivid writing, Katy Towell has this disturbing gift of picturing mentally tormented freak kids - mostly girls (which leaves me wondering about her school life). A few sections of the book was almost too much for me to bear, which of course again reflect her splendid writing style. Few writers I've read had done a better job vivifying characters, not mentioning our four little protagonists are by all means quite stand out - a werewolf girl who desperately tries to be normal, a school-less young Edison who knows no ill-will (with nothing abnormal, btw), a little damsel who's blessed and cursed by the ability of communicating with ghosts, and a Miss Juggernaut who don't seems to give two shits about nothing. These four kids, being wildly different but same as outcasts from "normal good children", formed this seemingly impossible alliance that eventually saved the world. Well, sorta.

A rough summary on Katy Towell's writing style could be "Miss Tim Burton".
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews