Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$1.08
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good: Cover and pages show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Slavery in Ancient Eygpt and Mesopotamia (Watts Library) Paperback – March, 2000

3.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback, March, 2000
"Please retry"
$100.69 $1.08

Up to 50% off popular Children's Books
Featured kid's books are up to 50% off for a limited time Learn More
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1070L (What's this?)
  • Series: Watts Library
  • Paperback: 63 pages
  • Publisher: Franklin Watts (March 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0531165388
  • ISBN-13: 978-0531165386
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.8 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,687,872 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By TammyJo Eckhart VINE VOICE on November 11, 2002
Verified Purchase
Studies into slavery at the earliest stages of human civilizations are tricky because we lack a lot of information we have later on in Greece, Rome, Hebrew society. Add into this the fact that the cultures being discussed here use languages which only a few scholars know and you are set for very limited information. Greene does a better job at finding useful information for the layperson in this book than in her other book on slavery in Greece and Rome. I was pleased to see the book laid-out according to culture and not just pushing all of the Mesopotamian world into one section. There are some things I'd disagree with but overall it seems like a very simple introduction for a younger junior high student. She needs better references on slavery itself to help such students further their independent interests.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
These are well written books that give a solid introduction to the history of slavery around the world and in different time periods. Greene's contributions to the series are conscientiously crafted and presented in a way that is of interest and accessible to young minds. The books are popular in libraries and classrooms.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on March 26, 2003
As a resercher in the historical field (Egyptology), I have to admit a little bit of disappointment. A better historical background should have been necessary than the "dozen books" mentioned by the author, to address such a subtle problem as slavery in the ancient Near East with a young public in mind. Nothing to object to the first chapter, where the treatment of the presumed origin and developement of slavery is reliabile and objective, although an approach in term of "involuntary labour" would have been appropriate: the reality behind the generalizing term "slavery" is quite eterogeneous. Yet several more or less evident flaws lies scattered inside: no Egyptian king ever owned and decided the destiny of all the slaves; that slaves were employed in pyramid building is unsupported by evidence; never heard of acts of mass-enslavement of foreigner (1550 a.C.); no archaological or epigraphic evidence of the "exodus" exists at present outside the Bible (just to mention a few points I am more concerned with). More than that, criticable and potentially missleading in my opinion is the confidence with which the matter is considered in the yet bare lack of agreement or clear formalization of the problem even among the experts (diffrently from the Greek-Roman world). More caution, I would also dare to invoke, in educational contextes addressed to a younger public in using as sun-bright thruths biblical references or names to enrich an historical portrait to which their original pertinence is far from being demostrable or accepted.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse