Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II Reprint Edition, Kindle Edition

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ISBN-13: 978-0385722704
ISBN-10: 0385722702
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  • Length: 498 pages
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Page Flip: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

“Shocking. . . . Eviscerates one of our schoolchildren's most basic assumptions: that slavery in America ended with the Civil War.”—TheNew York Times“An astonishing book. . . . It will challenge and change your understanding of what we were as Americans-and of what we are.”—Chicago Tribune “The genius of Blackmon's book is that it illuminates both the real human tragedy and the profoundly corrupting nature of the Old South slavery as it transformed to establish a New South social order.”—The Atlanta Journal-Constitution“A formidably researched, powerfully written, wrenchingly detailed narrative.”—St. Louis Post-Dispatch


From the Trade Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Wall Street Journal bureau chief Blackmon gives a groundbreaking and disturbing account of a sordid chapter in American history—the lease (essentially the sale) of convicts to commercial interests between the end of the 19th century and well into the 20th. Usually, the criminal offense was loosely defined vagrancy or even changing employers without permission. The initial sentence was brutal enough; the actual penalty, reserved almost exclusively for black men, was a form of slavery in one of hundreds of forced labor camps operated by state and county governments, large corporations, small time entrepreneurs and provincial farmers. Into this history, Blackmon weaves the story of Green Cottenham, who was charged with riding a freight train without a ticket, in 1908 and was sentenced to three months of hard labor for Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad, a subsidiary of U.S. Steel. Cottenham's sentence was extended an additional three months and six days because he was unable to pay fines then leveraged on criminals. Blackmon's book reveals in devastating detail the legal and commercial forces that created this neoslavery along with deeply moving and totally appalling personal testimonies of survivors. Every incident in this book is true, he writes; one wishes it were not so. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B001NLKT24
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Anchor; Reprint edition (December 27, 2008)
  • Publication date ‏ : ‎ December 27, 2008
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 4063 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 498 pages
  • Lending ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.8 out of 5 stars 1,899 ratings

About the author

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A native of Leland, Mississippi, Doug Blackmon is chair of the Miller Center Forum at the University of Virginia and a contributing correspondent to the Washington Post.

For many years, he was the Wall Street Journal's Atlanta Bureau Chief and then senior national correspondent. "Slavery by Another Name" was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2009, among many other honors. Blackmon and a team of WSJ reporters and editors were finalists for another Pulitzer Prize in 2010 for their investigation into the causes of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that year.

He lives in Atlanta.

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5
1,899 global ratings

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Top reviews from other countries

Ifayomi
5.0 out of 5 stars If you think you know the history of the enslavement of Afrikan people in the US think again
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 11, 2014
7 people found this helpful
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Simone Brewster
5.0 out of 5 stars The true history of America.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 13, 2018
John C
5.0 out of 5 stars The land of the free?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 19, 2013
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Ms. Fiona Allen
5.0 out of 5 stars Illuminating and terrifying
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 28, 2014
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Calverton Bent
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth the investment
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 10, 2019
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