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The Social Origins of the Urban South: Race, Gender, and Migration in Nashville and Middle Tennessee, 1890-1930 Hardcover – October 22, 2003

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

A rigorously argued and lucidly written study on an under-explored aspect of southern history: With its close attention to both the rural and the urban dimensions of this process, Kyriakoudes's well-researched and broadly interdisciplinary study represents a breakthrough in the literature in southern urban history. A very impressive debut.(Peter A. Coclanis, Unversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) -- Review

Review

A welcome effort.--Southern Cultures



Kyriakoudes's attention to migration is well taken and advances our knowledge of the urban South and its rural hinterland. This emphasis should inform future regional studies of southern urbanization.--Journal of American History



A compelling study of the complex interplay between city and country during four critical decades in which rural southerners faced the challenges of modernization. . . . deeply researched and carefully argued.--Journal of Southern History



Kyriakoudes is a thoughtful scholar. . . . The Social Origins of the Urban South [is] a pleasure to read and a rich text with which to work.--Urban Geography



[An] impressively constructed volume. . . . By bridging the histories of urban and agricultural history while dabbling in gender, race, labor, and other sub-disciplines, Kyriakoudes has made a valuable contribution to a number of fields. The author has combined thorough research with lucid, largely jargon-free writing.--H-Net



A rigorously argued and lucidly written study on an extremely important but under-explored aspect of southern history: the role of migration in the urbanization process in the New South. With its close attention to both the rural and the urban dimensions of this process, Kyriakoudes's well-researched and broadly interdisciplinary study represents a breakthrough in the literature in southern urban history. A very impressive debut.--Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



[Kyriakoudes] complicates a story that many historians once believed straightforward. . . . He builds a new account that puts complexity and ambiguity at the center of the story of southern migration. [The Social Origins of the Urban South] is also a book that puts forgotten people, men and women, African American and white, into a single coherent narrative. . . . Kyriakoudes's work is a model of how to integrate social, cultural, commercial, and migration history.--Georgia Historical Quarterly



[The term] 'rural to urban migration' becomes a multi-layered story of ambition and desire for independence in this concise and illuminating historical study. . . . There is much to use and celebrate in this valuable history.--Contemporary Sociology



[The Social Origins of the Urban South] makes a contribution that can further the valuable merging of history, sociology, and the regional studies subfield of cultural anthropology.--American Journal of Sociology

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (October 22, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807828114
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807828113
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,642,986 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
In this revised dissertation, the author suggests that migration tranformed the rural countryside of Middle Tennessee. With the breakdown of the traditional farm, various social, economic, and familial changes occurred, contributing to a great "outmigration" from the rural "Hinterlands" to urban Nashville. Progressives, though hoping to dispel the influx of migrants, instituted a series of reforms--namely, school reforms and road construction--that actually encouraged migration. The aim was far short of the mark.

Hoping to keep would-be migrants in the country, the aim was to give people better education and transportation routes, thereby quelling their need to move to the city (Nashville, in this case). Failing to address the root cause of the migration, city officials were inundated with an immense population that often faired no better than they had in the countryside. Blacks generally faired worse than whites (regardless of gender), while whites (particularly white women) often managed at least slightly better.

As Kyriakoudes makes clear, the breakdown of the rural community coupled with the introduction of urban values in the countryside left many without much avenue for advancement. Moving, says the author, was equated with poverty. To stay confined within an unpromising, if familiar, area was something many younger adults chose to leave behind.

Though I believe some of the evidence is wholly lacking, regarding black migrants especially, his conclusions are not exaggerated. The overall form of the dissertation makes for oft-times redundant reading, though holds up well until the later chapters.
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Format: Paperback
Very good...came in on time. Appreciate the great service by the company and would definitely use them in the future.
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