Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Some Dance to Remember: A Novel of Gay Liberation in San Francisco 1970-1982 Paperback – February, 1990

4.8 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, February, 1990
$19.00 $3.77

Featured Titles in Fiction
Beloved
Beloved
Beloved
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A testament to what went tragically wrong in gay men's lives, and society overall, in those long-gone golden days." -- Marilyn Jaye Lewis, Founder & Executive Director, The Erotic Authors Association

"I wouldn't be surprised if he has written what will be looked on as that period's Great American Gay Novel." -- Sam Steward (Phil Andros), Author of Dear Sammy: Letters from Gertrude and Alice --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

In her acceptance letter, publisher Elizabeth Gershman wrote, "I'd fucking kill to publish your novel, SOME DANCE TO REMEMBER"
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 562 pages
  • Publisher: Palm Drive Publishing (February 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1890834262
  • ISBN-13: 978-1890834265
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,164,763 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Tim Brough VINE VOICE on April 8, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The hardest thing to be in America today is a man."

I recall seeing the movie "The Boys In The Band" in college and being so put out by the loathsome men depicted in it that I was easily confined to the closet for another five years. Back in my high-school seventies, when the bulk of the activity in this book took place, I was just a kid with a confused identity. Even in college, I read about Moscone/Milk with a mix of confusion and anger, wondering why good men could get gunned down for little more than being who they were, while all the time I was denying to myself who I really was. It took me another decade or so to come to grips with it all, and to discover what one of the basic premises of "Some Dance To Remember" sets forth. It makes me wish I'd come across this book in the seventies and not viewed "The Boys In The Band."

From "Some Dance To Remember;" "Every gay man is a homosexual, but not every homosexual is gay."

Jack Fritscher has created a world in "Some Dance To Remember" that goes from romanticized to mythologized to the aftermath of when paradise crumbled under the corrosional erosion of AIDS, drugs and too many Peter Pans. Ryan O'Hara is the hero of the story. He publishes MANUEVERS magazine in pursuit of the romanticized masculine man, engaging in rough and tumble leathersex and disdaining the hordes of men who come to San Francisco only to give up any male traits and begin acting like Junior Judy Garlands. He publishes a book titled "The Masculinist Manifesto" and sets the feminests and the SF Queenly majority into a convulsions. (Any similarity to MANUEVERS and Mr. Fritscher's residency at the legendary DRUMMER magazine are purely coincidental.
Read more ›
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Perhaps you had to be there...the 70's, San Francisco, the blossoming and peak of the gay sexual culture. It was a rare time; everything, it seemed, was perfect. So perfect, in fact, that those of us there could not have possibly imagined it might ever be otherwise! The list of honors and citations which precede this more modest effort, don't really reveal or do justice to what Fritscher has written. He has, quite simply, told the truth, sometimes whispering secrets that were to remain secret, sometimes using words to betray unspeakable thoughts. The truth of that time is played out on a vast stage within his head, on occasion momentarily inaccessible. But, within a few paragraphs or pages, some small detail, as if casually discarded, will suddenly bring life, and meaning, and intimacy to what he is saying. Fritscher worked the better part of a decade on Some Dance to Remember, living the life as he wrote the words. The story is tightly and carefully knit together, and it's a story that's hard to put down. In spite of the high page count, Fritscher clearly has a reverence for language, and his style is economical, accessible, and crystal clear. His sentences invite re-reading for the sheer pleasure of their composition. Maybe this book is a tribute to those embraced by the San Francisco fog in that forever vanished, blessed, golden moment. I can only recall that wondrous time with a hollow sadness, everyday missing it even more. But even if you weren't there, the book is a monument to its time. The words come to life, and to read it is to be there. Although Fritscher (perhaps with a wink and a nod) steadfastly insists that his book is fiction, it is also a hagiology of people, place and time. A character such as Solly Bluestein (with his overflowing penthouse of husters) simply has to have really existed, if only because he is far too human to have not existed. So, if you've come this far with me, trust me...the book's a gem!
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I provide gay tours of San Francisco and I came across this novel which was written before I moved to the City. This memoir is chock full of gay history details when Castro was in bloom with Harvey Milk and the Cockettes and clones and leather in the 1970s. I think that tourists to San Francisco, especially gay tourists coming to Mecca, might better enjoy their visits to 18th and Castro and to Folsom Street with a copy of this memoir in their backpack. This is an emotional, historical guide to SOMA and 18th and Castro back in the day. Back in the day when the 1970s was the golden age. The writing is very good. The characters seem real. Even Dianne Feinstein is in the book.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As a graphic designing woman, I heard about this novel, borrowed a copy and was surprised to find several women characters who are more than stereotypes or hags, but around whom the plot actually, in many ways, revolves. I particularly liked Kweenasheba and the satirical art-world woman, January Guggenheim. Also, Sandy Gully, the wife of the Viet Vet, was of interest in her domestic desperation. "Boogie Nights" did the seventies one way. This novel remixes the seventies even in its title, which references the Eagles' "Hotel California" which I remember as a soundtrack for the seventies. I knew nothing of the gay video culture's vultures til I read the gay "Boogie Nights" parts of this novel which seems so real, I wonder if it's really fiction. Even Diane Feinstein enters the story. In all, I was fascinated. I think I was misled by my friends who said this is a gay novel. I think it's a novel, period, and a good novel at that.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews