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on February 26, 2017
The good humored satire in this, the first of P. G. Wodehouse's Blandings Castle series, is irresistible. The title is most appropriate, because the book is as fresh and delightful a century later as when it was written. Wodehouse was an outstanding writer, with a rare gift for describing characters and scenes, as well as weaving plausible but hilarious plots. His portrayals of the vague and absent-minded Lord Emsworth, the shallow but amiable Freddy Threepwood, and the hyper-efficient secretary Baxter, along with the rigid hierarchy and candid gossip of the servants, are wonderful.
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on February 18, 2006
This book was first published as "Something New" in the U.S. on September 3rd, 1915 by D. Appleton and Company, and then in the U.K. on September 16th, 1915 by Methuen & Co., and this is the first of the Blandings Castle stories. As far as Wodehouse stories go this is not his best, but it does introduce characters which appear in many of his later works.

The main two characters of the story are Ashe Marson, a writer of cheap detective novels, and Joan Valentine, a woman who lives in his apartment building who laughs at his morning exercises which results in their meeting. Neither of them is satisfied with what they are doing in life, and both are in the need for money.

The story moves to different characters from time to time, in typical Wodehouse fashion. Important characters include Aline Peters, Jane's friend who is engaged to Frederick Threepwood, who is the son of the Earl of Emsworth who is the lord of Blandings Castle, and is a very absent minded individual. Jane's father is J. Preston Peters, an American business man who collects scarabs and suffers from digestion problems.

Other characters included are Baxter, the Earl's secretary, and R. Jones, a less than honest man whom Frederick has hired to recover love letters he wrote to an actress (Joan Valentine) in the past which might contain evidence for a breach of promises suit. There are also the many guests and servants of Blandings Castle.

It would be impossible to cover all the twists in a Wodehouse plot, but many of his usual devices are here. Characters pretending to be someone they are not, misunderstandings galore, and love, of course. Some of the scenes which I liked the best included Baxter's attempts to catch someone trying to steal the Scarab, and the servant scenes where the hierarchy of servants comes into play. I have yet to read a Wodehouse book which wasn't enjoyable, and this one is no exception. However, there are many of his stories which are better than this one.

This edition is part of "The Collector's Wodehouse" series being published by The Overlook Press in the U.S. (in the U.K. it is "The Everyman's Wodehouse" series being published by Everyman's Library).
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on May 7, 2015
Wodehouse is great. Amazon thinks this is a different book from Wodehouse's Something New but it is the same book, which is free under that title. Something Fresh is also available as an Audible.com book and the narration is terrific. I like his other stuff better than Jeeves.
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on October 31, 2015
This is a fun audio book - the narrator is very good and differentiated the different characters for the listener. The plot was entertaining and the writing style was humorous. A great representation of PG Wodehouse's writing. I enjoyed this book and would recommend it.
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on September 29, 2016
Too many laughs! Once you get into this story you are in for it! If laughter does good like a medicine, this book is a drugstore!
Read this with my husband and shared the laughing till you can't see together. What a great read.
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on September 19, 2017
I genuinely have never seen a published book with as many typos as this one - love the book, but this publishing company is clearly a very budget operation, shame it reflects badly on such a wonderful author.
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on February 5, 2015
Humorous story, full of twists and turns. Fun characters with surprises along the way. The audio book helped while away the hours of a long drive. I do wish Wodehouse's idle, rich, single gentlemen had a bit more spunk and backbone.
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on November 2, 2013
Great vintage Wodehouse! One slapstick scene caused me to laugh aloud when I first read this story. Martin Jarvis brings it to life with his astounding range of voices and amusing interpretations. Don't miss it.
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on July 25, 2016
A charming Wodehouse---one of his best Blandings Castle books!!!!!
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on July 7, 2013
There isn't a single page on which Wodehouse doesn't offer a few perfect sentences. In fact, even the more mundane sentences have a very satisfying sound and weight to the ear.
as usual, he's very funny and on a number of levels. The situations are often rollickingly ludicrous but the wordplay and word choices light up each page.
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