Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Son and Father: Before and Beyond the Oedipus Complex First Edition Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
ISBN-13: 978-0029036808
ISBN-10: 0029036801
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$9.95
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Stored and shipped by Amazon. Acceptable book. All text readable. Shows wear. No dust cover.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
33 Used from $0.01
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
More Buying Choices
7 New from $24.50 33 Used from $0.01 2 Collectible from $25.00
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 186 pages
  • Publisher: Free Pr; First Edition edition (October 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0029036801
  • ISBN-13: 978-0029036808
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,181,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By cortezhill VINE VOICE on August 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
While the role of the early son-mother relationship in the male life cycle has been extensively examined by psychoanalysis, the role of the father has remained woefully neglected and incomplete. But in this pioneerng book distinguished author and analyst Peter Blos proposes a fundamental modification of the traditional view of male personality formation, challenging the centrality of the Oedipus complex both to male development and to the origin of neurosis.

Divided into three sections Son and Father first presents Blos's original theory - the culmination of his decades of psychoanalytic work with male children, adolescents, and adults. Emphasizing that every father has first been a son, Blos traces the reciprocal influence of son-father dynamics over a three-generation course, as son relates first to father and then, as father himself, to son. While he concurs with the position of traditional theory that the male child resolves his attachment to the mother before entering latency, he demonstrates that the son does not reconcile his feelings toward the father - repressed during the decline of the Oedipal stage - until adolescence.

Next, Blos illustrates his view with literary evidence drawn from Franz Kafka's autobiographical Letter to My Father, documenting the novelists unresolved emotional attachment to his father. He then compares Kafka's confessional work with Freud's Schreber case, in which the father complex plays a central role in the development of a psychotic illness. Blos also applies his concepts to Shakespeare's Hamlet, focusing on the infantilizing power of the title character's never abandoned early idealization of his father.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse