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And Soon the Darkness

3.7 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Pamela Franklin, Michele Dotrice, Sandor Elès, John Nettleton, Clare Kelly
  • Directors: Robert Fuest
  • Writers: Brian Clemens, Terry Nation
  • Producers: Albert Fennell, Brian Clemens
  • Format: Anamorphic, Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    PG
    Parental Guidance Suggested
  • DVD Release Date: May 21, 2002
  • Run Time: 94 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005RYLC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #127,751 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "And Soon the Darkness" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Paul Kesler on January 30, 2004
Format: DVD
"And Soon the Darkness" is one of those odd little films that occasionally surfaces in some of the better reference books on horror and suspense, but remains unknown to the casual fan.
This is unfortunate, because "Darkness" is something almost unique in the suspense genre: a film taking place almost completely in daylight, yet conveying a sense of encroaching doom that rivals some of the best films in the field.
The film is almost plotless. Two nurses go on a biking excursion through the French countryside to see "the real France." But they have a falling out, and after their rift one of them (played by Michelle Dotrice) is murdered by an unseen (off-screen) assailant. The other girl, Pamela Franklin, struggles on, but soon a lone detective, claiming to be from the police, joins her, and they "collaborate" in a search for the missing girl.
It isn't long before "Jane" (Pamela) grows suspicious of the detective, and starts to believe he's the killer. Once this suspicion dawns, we witness her sporadic attempts to get to the bottom of things. Her meetings with the local gendarme, a café owner, a schoolteacher, and a blind war veteran, uncover nothing ---- though their collective "testimony" only adds to her unease. Eventually, of course, we discover the real killer, who, though constantly prowling the daylight, almost succeeds in delivering "darkness" to his second victim in a row.
To repeat ---- the remarkable thing about the film is how the constant scanning of open, sun-drenched fields and barren roads evokes an atmosphere of dread. I'm hard-pressed to name another film which accomplishes its aims by similar means ---- almost all the clichés of cobwebs, shadowy stairways, and rain-soaked streets are missing here.
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By A Customer on May 30, 2002
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Two British girls riding the French countryside on bicycles. A mad killer loose. It seems the formula for a sleazy thriller, but luckily this is not that sort of movie. This is an intelligent, moody, wonderful thriller full of unexpected touches. I love the way movie builds up the tension and keeps you guessing until the very end. I also love how the movie builds suspense upon the British girls (and our own) lack of knowledge of the French language. This makes all characters seem suspicious.
The DVD transfer is excellent and the audio commentary is interesting. All in all, a must buy.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
Robert Fuest (Avengers, The Abominable Dr. Phibes) directs a slow-burning masterwork of mood and dread. What struck me in the first few moments, before the story got its hooks into me, was how unadorned the direction of this film is. Surprising, given Mr. Fuest's resume. But not surprising, given the simple set up and spare elements of this story - just two young women cycling through the French countryside on holiday, about to take a figurative detour into trouble. That's all I'll say about the story. This is a film that you should enter into knowing as little as possible, as I did, and allow it to tighten its cords about you unawares as you sit transfixed through scene after scene. For this is a story that unfolds like one of those disorienting real-life episodes that we've all been through at some point - like getting lost somewhere, then working your way through the confusion as you problem-solve your situation. This movie is JUST like that, causing us to identify closely with the lead character and worry for her all the way.

Without giving anything away, the film's power lies in how it masterfully keeps us guessing - guessing about what has happened, who we can trust, and how it holds its secret to the very end, yielding nothing - a feat deserving of study by today's filmmakers, who fill the world with so much "predictablilia". There is nothing predictable about this story because it feels so plotless, so absent of formula, so uncliched. Just a natural unfolding of events, like real experience, and yet dreamlike. This is why it remains remarkable to this day.

The movie stars Pamela Franklin (The Legend of Hellhouse), who is perfectly cast as the more responsible of the two girls, her more frivolous companion played by Michele Dotrice (Hammer Film's The Witches).
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Format: DVD
I asked the question the other night "why can't they make a film that doesn't rely on nudity or torture scenes?". The next night a friend brought over this movie and it was refreshing to see a well made movie that had a plot, odd characters, suspense, nice camera work and direction. The acting wasn't Oscar material but it wasn't nearly as bad as I have seen in other movies. And there is no nudity, excessive gore, torture, benging on drugs/alcohol or excessive profanity. Instead the movie relies on a solid plot, nice camera work and direction. It is more of a suspense than a horror.

Two British nurses are biking through the French countryside. They stop for a rest, have an argument then end up splitting up. One goes ahead to the next town. The other stays to lay out in the sun and rest. After a few hours of waiting for her friend to show up she starts questioning a few of the odd locals and soon discovers the road she is traveling on is a "Bad Road"...things get interesting from there. The entire movie takes place in daylight hours. The small towns along the country road are desolate the town folk look poor and tired. What makes the town people "odd" in my opinion is that they rarely talk. They mainly observe what goes on around them and try to stay indoors (the doors are locked alot in the movie). They are not openly friendly nor do they volunteer any information. Later in the movie the viewer finds out why they don't volunteer any information and it comes together rather nicely.
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