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The Soviet Manned Space Program First Edition Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0517569542
ISBN-10: 051756954X
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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This book is as much a detective story about trying to gather information in the pre- glasnost Soviet Union as it is an exhaustive history of every Soviet manned space mission. Of particular interest is the coverage of the Soviets' unsuccessful manned lunar program of the 1960s. Unfortunately, the author's dry writing style and the almost excruciating detail make this volume less readable than similar histories, e.g., James E. Oberg's Red Star in Orbit ( LJ 6/15/81) and Peter R. Bond's Heroes In Space ( LJ 6/15/87). Nevertheless, given its excellent illustrations, as well as the burgeoning Soviet space program itself, this is still highly recommended.
- Thomas J. Frieling, Bainbridge Coll., Ga.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Crown; First Edition edition (November 11, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 051756954X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517569542
  • Product Dimensions: 12.2 x 8.7 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,422,104 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

By Rogera Sauterer on October 1, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Although now out of print and seriously in need of a revised edition, this is the best history in English of the Soviet manned space program up to the late 1980's. It was published in 1988, just as the first of the glasnost revelations about the Soviet space program was coming out, but since then much new material has been released. Phillip Clark is a well-known analyst of the Soviet space program who is a consultant for the European aerospace industry, and his studies are highly regarded in the field. Overall, the histories of the Vostok, Voskhod, and Soyuz programs in this book are the best available in English (and I've read most of the ones that are available), and the history of the Salyut and early phases of the Mir programs are excellent. The coverage of the Soviet manned lunar N-1/L3 and L-1 (Zond) programs was good based on the very limited information available at the time (The Soviets did not formally admit to having a manned lunar landing program until after the book was published), but are now very outdated and are in error in some places, now that the Russians have released many formerly classified details about these programs. Overall, the book is fairly scholarly, but is also written for the general reader, which is in itself quite an accomplishment. It is profusely illustrated with photographs, many in color, diagrams, and details of the spacecraft and launch systems. Despite this book being seriously out of date, it still should be considered an essential book for any serious enthusiast of Soviet space history. One can only hope that the author revises this superb book to incorporate all the new information released by the Russians. Mr Clark, are you listening???
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Format: Hardcover
I am fascinated by the Russian and former Soviet crewed space program; I love the Soyuz spacecraft and can remember being in France in the summer of 1975 when Apollo 18 and Soyuz 19 docked in space.
This book is the best of its kind that I have seen in English, and it is my sincere hope that Phillip Clark will write a revised and updated edition.
I hope to someday learn how to read Russian but in the meantime I think Mr. Clark's book is the best reference on this subject that I will be able to find.
It is also my sincere hope that the United States of America and the Russian Republic will go hand in hand to Mars; I am also glad for the International Space Station where Americans and Russians are learning to work together in preparation for the long and arduous journey to Mars.
I would even recommend this book to any layperson.
Gery Bedard
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very dated now, with some historical data that's since been corrected as a result of post-Soviet Union declassification of the record. E.g., the old account of Laika's death (euthanized after days in orbit) was subsequently changed based on public statements by scientists involved with the mission (she died of overheating only a few hours into the flight).

Aside from that quibble - not the book's fault, after all - it's interesting, though it's definitely more focused on the geekery of rocket designs and payloads than on the cultural background of the Soviet program. There are other books for that.
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Format: Hardcover
Hardcover book with almost 200 pages, great photos and drawingcomparable with those seen in Russian language books on this subject!The book covers all soyuz missions up to the first launches to the MIR space station! A must for each serious space flight enthusiast. An updated version would be welcome by the turn of the Millennium 2001 !
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