Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Spilling the Beans Hardcover – September 1, 2007

4.2 out of 5 stars 58 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$25.30 $0.01

You'll Grow Out of It by Jessi Klein
You'll Grow Out of It
The exciting new release from Jessi Klein. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The autobiography of the year."  —Daily Mail


"Witty, eye-popping life story."  —Traverse City Record-Eagle

About the Author

Clarissa Dickson Wright is the author of five cookbooks, including The Game Cookbook, A Greener Life, and Sunday Roast.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (September 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340933887
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340933886
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #785,602 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you were a fan of 'Two Fat Ladies', are an Anglo-phile, or need an inspirational and funny read, this is your book. I spent the weekend devouring this memoir and enjoying every page. Clarissa writes with honesty and candor about her early life with an alcoholic and violent parent, her brilliant legal career, a devastating love life and loss, her despair and descent into alcoholism and her slow but steady rise to fame afterwards.

Though she may have been born with every advantage, she lost it all, money, friends, home, career, and ultimately through courage and hard work became a self-made woman and rose to fame in the short-lived, but much loved cooking show, "Two Fat Ladies".

A very enjoyable read.
Comment 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I've enjoyed the author as a TV cook, her humor and style as one of the Two Fat Ladies was delightful. I own many of her books and have enjoyed both the cookbooks and the country books. This book about her life was a suprise to me as I had no clue she was from an abusive home. I have such respect for her. In this age of whiny delicate little flowers (BLECCH!) I admire her strength of character and ability to be thankful for her life, accepting both good and bad with dignity and grace.
Comment 37 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Hilarious, frightening, shocking, exciting, and always readable, Clarissa Dickson Wright's autobiography depicts her rollercoaster of a life in a compelling but always sympathetic manner. One of the best memoirs in recent memory.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really liked this book, despite the fact that Clarissa rambles a bit. I was sort of like sitting down with a friend and catching up, with the sort of discursiveness that sometimes happens in that sort of conversation. This is a book with a lot of sad times interspersed with hilarious anecdotes. Clarissa is a woman of strong opinions. I don't always agree with her, but I think she'd be a lot of fun to have as a friend (seeing how I like friends with strongly held opinions). If you think the "nanny state" is a bad thing, thing that self-sufficiency and local production is a good thing, if you like good food, and a good tale you'll probably enjoy this book. Clarissa has managed to pick up the pieces of a life gone very wrong and come out on top. She hasn't come out on top in the sense that she's gotten rich or even enormously famous (far fewer people even know who she is than know who Brad Pitt is for instance). She's come out on top because she's found a way to live that is satisfying and which has made a difference to a lot of people.

The stories of The Two Fat ladies videos make them even more fun to watch. I really wish there were a video series to go with her book on the green life. I'd really love to see Clarissa mucking about with the ducks and the chickens and making things in the old fashioned way.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Clarissa Dickson Wright is a dying breed - an English eccentric. Like many of the type, she has many admirable qualities, and many that are tiresome and potentially self destructive.

Starting with the positive, Clarissa of Two Fat Ladies fame is a forthright, intelligent, passionate lady with trenchant opinions. These are frequently expressed on these pages in the sort of muscular, simple language beloved of barbour wearing types listening to the Archers whilst knocking up a Sunday Roast for the family.

She has suffered genuine hardships - an abusive, alcoholic father (the famous Royal surgeon Arthur Dickson Wright) who beat her and her mother, often savagely. She is genuinely passionate about a lot of good British things - the countryside, locally produced food, field sports (taking delightful swipes at the tiresome and nasty 'fluffy bunny brigage' who hurled such filthy abuse at the countryside alliance march), history - her grasp of British history is wide ranging and impressive. Her asides into points of arcane fact are frequently illuminating, explaining, for example, that the Scottish word 'gigot' for a leg of lamb derives from that Auld Alliance between the Scots and the French pre-dating the Hundred Years War.

As for the negative. Much of the book fits into the tedious 'misery memoir' genre beloved of supermarkets (ironic, really, given Clarissa's well founded loathing of the institutions) where the writer of the memoir throws away much of what they have due to their own destructiveness, and then spends the rest of the book smugly retelling how they got it back, poking fun at 'bourgeoise' virtues all the time. In Clarissa's case she inherited a fortune worth nearly 3 million, squandered it on booze over 5 years (that must be going some!
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Clarissa Dickson Wright rose to fame in the mid 90's as one half of the TV cooking team "The Two Fat Ladies." In Spilling the Beans she lays out for her fans her extraordinary life, focuses especially on her privileged birth, abusive father and her battle with alcoholism.

Clarissa was born into what should have been a good life, the youngest daughter of an heiress mother and an internationally known surgeon father she had all the advantages but a great deal of that was shattered by her father's drinking and physical abuse. Beyond setting her up for her own substance abuse issues down the line it also taught her to enjoy life while you can and to make your own way in life.

She lists her early life, her career as a barrister, she studied law just to annoy her father who wanted her to be a doctor, and then after drink ended that career, rebuilding herself as a cook and then as a sober cook, as she discovered she was good at one of the few nice things her father had taught her, a love of good food. She details her love of the country side and how her support of certain rural groups effectively ended her television career as "the fluffy bunny brigade" flooded the BBC with protests against her.

Indeed she tells of a wonderful life laying out her mistakes and detailing her triumphs. Through her honesty she has helped many other people have the courage to face their issues. If there is any problem with the book, I would say I would like to have had more details about her time on The Two Fat Ladies than the details she did go into. But to be fair that was a fairly short period in an amazing life and one well worth reading about.

If you buy the audio book instead of the readable version you have the added treat of Clarissa reading it herself.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: memoir