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Stan Getz/Bill Evans Import

4.2 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, February 16, 1988
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Editorial Reviews

Classic original 1964 collaboration album from Bill Evans and Stan Getz with 5 bonus tracks. Features Ron Carter on bass and Elvin Jones on drums
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 16, 1988)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Imports
  • ASIN: B00000476E
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #37,951 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Giuseppe C. HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 28, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I avoided this recording because of all that's been written about the session being a failure, a misfire and miscalculation, an assembly of musicians who simply never could get it together. Au contraire! What I'm hearing is engaging music, inspired playing on all hands, a fascinating conversation among marvelous musicians who haven't spoken the same dialect long enough for it to become predictable, patterned, bland.

The session reminds me a bit of the Coltrane-Ellington recording, an iconic meeting on which Duke, for reasons known only to himself, barely offers a chord or two during Elvin Jones' playing. As a pianist, I can testify to the mutual unease and "feeling out" that accompanies the beginning of every job with a strange, new drummer. Bill seems to know that with Elvin on hand, this is not to be a "business-as-usual" Bill Evans' session, and to his credit he locates his place within the rhythmic universe of Elvin. (Another factor is Richard Davis, a gifted player but less secure and reassuring as a "walker" than Ron Carter, with whom he shares duties.)

This is an extroverted, "physical" session, and Getz is relishing every moment. Listen to "My Heart Stood Still" (master take). He's a giddy kid, pulling off wildly exhuberant melodic intervals and phrasings I've never heard from him before (let alone any other tenor player), playing with freeness, joy and abandon. Now listen to what occurs when it's Bill's turn. He lets the bass walk companionless, leaving us to wonder if he's ever going to show up or is about to pull an Ellington and disappear.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Clearly, Verve records was excited. Getz had just finished a whirlwind, five record sequence of bossa nova, and was looking to get back into more traditional jazz. Evans was soon to get his first Grammy for Conversations With Myself and seemed perched to break out into a larger audience. Now they were scheduled for two studio days with one of the best drummers in the market (Elvin Jones, who'd recently proven his "softer music" chops on John Coltrane's Ballads) and what might have been the two best modern bassists in the US (Richard Davis on one day and Ron Carter the next). You could practically hear the slow burn beginning before the players showed up.

Of course, that's not what happened. Getz had a legendary sense of competition and a very prickly side. Evans could be particular and sarcastic and rarely wished to work with horns, much less a horn with an ego. Jones certainly had flexibility, but under pressure tended to push a la Art Blakey, upping the temperature of a low-key date. The bassists moved with the drummer, and the next thing you know you had a hard bop album from two artists perceived on the cool side (which hadn't ever been true of Evans, and which was in no way fully true of Getz). The record label, clearly frustrated, shelved this superstar session for almost a decade. But they shouldn't have. "Night and Day" starts things off with Jones at a pounding pulse, with Evans responding in the way he would to Philly Joe Jones, and Getz matching him.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is an enjoyable pairing of two great artists, though I found it to be a better showcase for Getz than for Evans. Other reviewers have criticized what they believe are uninspired performances and a lack of cohesiveness in the group (which also includes Elvin Jones on drums and bassists Ron Carter and Richard Davis each playing half the album). That's not what I'm hearing - on the contrary, check out the exuberance of "Funkallero," the comfortable Latin-influenced swing of "Night and Day," the up-tempo yet subtle rendering of "My Heart Stood Still," the lighthearted "Grandfather's Waltz," and the gorgeous ballad playing on "But Beautiful" and "Melinda."
The six tunes mentioned above constitute the original 1964 release. The CD adds two previously unreleased bonus tracks, "Carpetbagger's Theme" and "WNEW." Both of these are nice, but short, together totaling just four and a half minutes. There are also three alternate takes, but as is usually the case with alternates, these add only marginally to the value of the collection and are not likely to displace the primary takes on your playlist.
The liner notes were written for this 1987 release and provide useful information. Overall, a good package worth adding to your jazz collection.
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Format: Audio CD
I've been a fan of both Bill Evans and Stan Getz since my earliest exposure to jazz. Just about anything from either one of these all time greats earns high marks from critic and fan alike based, if nothing else, on the body of work each created during their careers. Unfortunately this album is the exception to the rule...sometimes the whole is LESS than the sum of the parts.

I own this recording as an import pressing of the original Verve LP which was cut in 1963, not 1964 as indicated. Further, it wasn't released until 1973 in mono; which, given the year of recording, indicates Verve didn't think too highly of it at the time. Besides uninspired performances the sound quality leaves much to be desired. While Elvin Jones ranks highly in the jazz canon of percussionists I don't believe he and Evans had the same rapport in evidence as when Evans teamed with Paul Motian or Larry Bunker.

This is hardly an "essential recording" from either artist and I'm somewhat surprised at Amazon.com's editors listing it as so. From Evan's corner I'd pick "Trio 64" as much more worthy of an "essential recording" from that time period. And if you want to hear Stan Getz at his pre bossa nova best in the piano trio format check out the Verve CD "Stan Getz meets Oscar Peterson."
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