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Star Trek III: The Search for Spock 1984

PG CC
Available on Prime

Admiral Kirk and his bridge crew risk their careers stealing the decommissioned Enterprise to return to the restricted Genesis planet to recover Spock's body.

Starring:
William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy
Runtime:
1 hour, 45 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Adventure, Action
Director Leonard Nimoy
Starring William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy
Supporting actors DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, Walter Koenig, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Robin Curtis, Merritt Butrick, Phil Morris, Scott McGinnis, Robert Hooks, Carl Steven, Vadia Potenza, Stephen Manley, Joe W. Davis, Paul Sorensen, Cathie Shirriff, Christopher Lloyd, Stephen Liska
Studio Paramount
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Don't be fooled by some of the negative reviews here. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock is a thoughtful meditation on the nature of friendship. I admire its careful attention to developing a classical story arc in which Kirk is driven by concern for his friends (Spock and McCoy) and by outer events (a feckless Federation bureaucracy) to steal the Enterprise and outwit and outrun enemies on all sides. Indeed, the film's first act is a gem: a model of balanced writing in its build-up to Kirk's inexorable conclusion that he must steal the Enterprise to save his friends. Among the priceless scenes in that first half-hour: A visit by Spock's father to Kirk's San Francisco pad in which, during a "mind meld" between them, successive shots end with a quiet, touching close-up of Kirk's eye as he relives Spock's "death" in the previous film; Scottie's hilarious asides toward a pompous captain played deftly by character actor James Sikking; and Kirk being told by a superior officer that under no conditions can he undertake a mission to save his friends as the camera tracks in on him, staring off in the middle distance, his inevitable insubordination written on his face. Good stuff. Even better is the focus (singularly among the Star Trek movies, which usually concern the Enterprise crew saving the Earth or the universe) on Kirk's mission to save his friends and the sacrifices he makes in the process. I can tell you (if you haven't seen the film) that these sacrifices are significant, in once case touchingly sad and in another spectacular.Read more ›
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Format: DVD
Though lacking the philosophical depth of The Motion Picture, and the heart-pounding action of The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock ultimately succeeds because it's primarily a character driven story, which recalls the best episodes of the original series. Spock's resurrection is handled convincingly--no magical regeneration with a shiny blue animated line here. In all aspects, Leonard Nimoy does a fine job in his directorial debut--he can clearly handle a camera and brings forth strong performances from his actors. Robin Curtis more than holds her own in the role of Lt. Saavik, originally portrayed by Kirstie Alley. The consistently underrated William Shatner shines here, giving a performance which is by turns somber and impassioned. DeForest Kelley also deserves praise as the Spock-possessed McCoy.
Most of the special effects have held up well over the years, and the few that haven't are not overly distracting. Star Trek has never been beholden to special effects, but has generally relied upon character development and story--and this emphasis has served it well over the years.
The picture is identical to the first DVD issue, which improved on both the VHS and Laser Disc issues--the colors are more vibrant and crisper. The sound also has more impact than the earlier versions.
This is one of the few films where the theatrical cut WAS the director's cut, so there are no added scenes here. The commentary by Nimoy and the rest is interesting and informative, as is Michael Okuda's text commentary. The cast interviews, as always, are entertaining, although I would have liked to have heard more of what REALLY happened during the infamous 1983 fire at Paramount studios. Less entertaining are the featurettes on terraforming, the Klingon language, and the visual effects, which contain almost no behind the scenes footage.
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Format: DVD
Star Trek III The Search for Spock is a wonderful, middle movie to the more or less trilogy of II, III and IV. I was a little disappointed that Kirstie Allie couldn't pick up where she left off in the role of Saavik. Robin Curtis does do a very good job though. Christopher Lloyds Klingon Commander is absolutely Klingon through and through. All of the original cast members are true to their characters. Overall, Star Trek III is not the best of the original six, but it's most certainly not the worst either. A wonderful story that, like all the rest, I've watched more times than I can remember.
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Format: DVD
This movie is much weaker than either of the first two. But then, it has to be. From the start, it is based on an inherently hokey premise: after The Wrath Of Khan, another Star Trek movie could only exist if it found a way to bring Spock back from the dead. Of course, there's no way to do that believably.

So, the writers use the crutch of Vulcan mysticism, and invent a ritual whereby Spock can be resurrected. The Vulcans have so many super powers that, by all rights, they really ought to be running the entire Federation. They're already super-smart, super-strong, and live for hundreds of years, and now they also have immortal souls that can be transferred between bodies. Even less believable is the idea that Kirk would know nothing about these aspects of Vulcan culture, despite being best friends with a Vulcan for years. Don't they have liberal arts requirements at Starfleet Academy?

But, miraculously, all this is almost palatable, because they bring back Mark Lenard as Spock's somber father. For me, much of the appeal of the entire Star Trek franchise comes from its remarkable luck in finding actors with precisely this kind of old-fashioned acting style. Mark Lenard, David Warner, Ricardo Montalban, and even the much-ridiculed William Shatner all have a mannered, theatrical diction and bearing, a style that is unsuitable for realistic, "modern" stories, but perfect for depicting epic archetypes.
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