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Star Trek - The Original Series, Episode 59: The Enterprise Incident [VHS]

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Nichelle Nichols, Bill Blackburn
  • Directors: John Meredyth Lucas
  • Writers: Gene Roddenberry, D.C. Fontana
  • Producers: Edward K. Milkis, Fred Freiberger, Gene Roddenberry, Gregg Peters, Robert H. Justman
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: CBS Paramount International Television
  • VHS Release Date: April 15, 1994
  • Run Time: 46 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300213625
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #166,836 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

An overwrought, highly-stressed Captain Kirk blunders into Romulan space and finds the Enterprise surrounded by enemy vessels, all equipped with strategically valuable cloaking technology. Along with Spock, Kirk is invited to meet with the Romulan commander (Joanne Linville) to discuss the situation, leading to a crisis when the captain suffers a breakdown following Spock's apparent betrayal. Written by story editor Dorothy Fontana (who was unhappy with the final results) and directed by John Meredyth Lucas (who briefly took the producing reins from Gene L. Coon during season two), the episode has a colorful espionage angle, but depends heavily on an improbable romance between Spock and Linville's character. Still, there are things to savor here, especially Kirk's one-and-only appearance with Vulcan/Romulan pointed ears. --Tom Keogh

From the Back Cover

A mentally unbalanced Kirk orders the Enterprise into Romulan space, where it is captured. Spock betrays the Captain and seems to fall for the beautiful Romulan commander.

TREK TRIVIA
For more than twenty years, Joanne Linville was Star Trek'sonly female Romulan (until Carolyn Seymour played Sub-Commander Taris in the The Next Generationepisode "Contagion").
This episode suggests that the Romulan cloaking device is new technology. In fact, it had been used in "Balance Of Terror" fifty episodes earlier.

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By Joe Owen VINE VOICE on September 4, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
The Enterprise Incident in my opinion is one of the top 5 episodes in the original series. I always like it when the Romulans or Klingons appear in the Star Trek Series be it The Next Generation or Deep Space Nine or Voyager. But the original series really gets it right when it came to the Romulans (not only this epiode but in the episode "Balance of Terror"). This episode begins with the Enterprise crossing the Neutral Zone which is like the Iron Curtain during the Cold War between the USA and USSR.
What the Enterprise is doing in Romulan Territory is anyone's guess until the last 20 minutes or so. Several twists in the plot occur and it is suspensful from the beginning to the end.
The Romulan Commander is played by the beautiful Joanne Linville and she gives an unforgettable performance.
Highly recommended to all Star Trek fans!
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Format: VHS Tape
Seeming tense and erratic, Captain Kirk takes the U.S.S. Enterprise into Romulan space and the ship is immediately surrounded by Romulan warships. Kirk and Spock beam aboard the Romulan flag-ship and confront the Romulan Commander, a woman. Kirk explains that his ship entered Romulan territory because of equipment malfunction. Spock, however, denounces this explanation, saying Kirk ordered them here, due to his reduced mental stability. This, not surprisingly, enrages the Captain. The Romulan Commander orders the U.S.S. Enterprise be taken to the Romulan base. Scotty, placed in command of the starship, refuses. McCoy is beamed aboard the flag-ship to tend Kirk, who has become irrational to the point of violence. When he arrives, Kirk attacks Spock who reacts, without thinking, by using the Vulcan death grip, killing Kirk. McCoy returns to the U.S.S. Enterprise with Kirk's body, while Spock remains on the Romulan ship. Unknown to the Romulan Commander, this has all been a ploy to sneak the officers on board and steal the Romulan cloaking device. After Kirk's body has been removed to his ship, the Romulan Commander begins to try and entice Spock into defecting to the Romulan side. Disguised as a Romulan, Kirk returns to the Romulan ship and steals the vessel's cloaking device and returns with it to the U.S.S. Enterprise. When the Commander discovers the theft, she feels betrayed and in retaliation decides to execute Spock. The Vulcan pretends to confess to her and ultimately stalls until Scotty is able to install the cloaking device on board the U.S.S. Enterprise. Spock is beamed back aboard the starship, but since the Romulan Commander was standing near him, she is also beamed aboard.Read more ›
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Format: VHS Tape
One of TOS' third-season episodes, "The Enterprise Incident" aired, as I recollect, around the time of the real-world "Pueblo" incident and raised similar questions about loyalty, ethics, and dishonor.
It's a flawed episode, the relationship between Spock and the Romulan Commander played by Joanne Linville made more "human" by physical contact than was originally the intention of the episode's creators.
Still, no episode in classic Trek has produced a guest character who has appeared in more subsequent books than the Romulan Commander. I remember how startled I was when she first appeared: a woman, and commanding a fleet of her own! A woman with passion, ambition, and force.
Over the course of thirty years now, I've alternated between wishing she -- and the script writers -- had been kept more aloof; there are times when I have hated to see her made a fool of. And then, there are times when I admire the character for keeping to her own agenda, even at the risk of her life and honor.
Perhaps this episode's greatest triumph is that it keeps viewers guessing and wishing they knew what happened next.
We've tried in VULCAN'S HEART to give our own ideas about that. We're not the first to try, and I doubt we'll be the last.
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It's ironic. In "The Cage," a female second-in-command was too controversial for Starfleet, or at least for NBC, but season 3 gave us a female in command of her own ship. This one was Romulan, making us wonder -- were the Romulans more enlightened than us? And what a commander. Tough. Sexy. Alluring. Powerful. Seductive. And IN CHARGE. With more than a little fondness toward a certain Vulcan we know. Load up the photon torpedoes and beam us up!!!

There were other controversies associated with this show. Originally it was intended as a re-telling of the Pueblo Incident, a tragic episode in the Vietnam era. In the original story, Starfleet orders the Enterprise across the Neutral Zone for no very good reason, and the crew suffers humiliating capture as a result. The revised script changes the ending. Which raises a question -- what was the purpose of the series? To show that an advanced, international version of the American Way would triumph in the galaxy... or to examine the American Way and critique its shortcomings? I think it did both. But re-telling the Pueblo Incident would have perhaps been too sensitive in the 1960s -- though fascinating to see now.

Another controversy was the handling of the love scene between Spock and the Romulan commander (Joanna Linville). Nimoy was adamant that this not be played like a Terran love scene, meaning no touching. In the version that was shot, there was touching... but of the Vulcan variety, with hands touching foreheads, and no kissing. It strikes me today as effective and appropriate.
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