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The Starman Omnibus Vol. 6 Hardcover – January 25, 2011

5.0 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
Book 6 of 5 in the Starman II Omnibus Series

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Product Details

  • Series: Starman Omnibus (Book 6)
  • Hardcover: 544 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (January 25, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 140123044X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401230449
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 1.2 x 10.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #460,103 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By H. Bala TOP 500 REVIEWER on February 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's rare that an ongoing comic book rewards the reader with a definitive ending. Reading James Robinson's musings in his afterword, seems like dude had the ending in mind some time ago, perhaps all the way from jump. And, yep indeedy, this must-have final omnibus volume makes good on Robinson's many moments of foreshadowing. STARMAN OMNIBUS Vol. 6 collects issues #61-81 and brings the curtain down, all over again, on one of the best comic books you and I have or will ever read. A hell of an opus, was STARMAN.

There's huge gratification for folks who've been with this series from the first issue as Robinson drops the Grand Guignol saga, chronicled in issues #61-73. In Grand Guignol, painstaking continuity is serviced, plot threads from prior arcs are revisited, and past characters who were even marginally relevant are re-introduced for one last bow. Yeah, bit players like Crusher and Frankie Soul and even the Prairie Witch all partake (but do you remember these cats?). Robinson is simply masterful in tying everything but everything into an elegant, meticulous fit.

Here be the plotty plot: Fresh off his quest in deep space to learn the fate of his girlfriend Sadie's brother, Jack Knight comes home at last. Only to be drawn promptly into yet another vicious siege on his beloved Opal City. Another coordinated crime spree to tax the Opal's law enforcers and resident capes to their cracking point - and this time even more villains are recruited, many of them familiar to Jack. And this time, Jack's longtime ally, the mercurial Shade, is implicated. Has Shade, former master villain, assumed his old stripes? Or is there some dirty sleight-of-hand going on? It's surely not accidental that Robinson is bringing things full circle.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The previous reviewer did a great job of summing up the appeal of this volume and the Starman series in general. One of the great things about using a minor character (i.e. the original Starman) as the spring-board for this series is that it allowed a degree of creative freedom that you could never have with an iconic character like Batman or Green Lantern to tell an epic story worthy of Dickens. Sadly, I can't relate my favorite moment without a significant spoiler (it's in issue #73), but suffice it to say that Starman is a book whose heart was always in the right place, which you couldn't say about a lot of comics at that time.

Of late, the pendulum superhero comics seems to have swung back towards the heroic, and perhaps that makes Starman seem less innovative in retrospect. Don't let that deter you from enjoying it, because it's just that enjoyable to read. Other than maybe Roy Thomas' 1980s JSA series All-Star Squadron, I can't think of any series that struck as perfect a balance between questioning the off-key attitudes of the Golden Age while also demonstrating why those characters continue to warrant our affection decades after they'd been left for dead.
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Format: Hardcover
"Starman Omnibus, Volume 6"
Written by James Robinson
(DC Comics, 2010)

I was a Marvel fan when I was kid, and missed this title the first time around in the 1990s... Fortunately I have a friend who was a DC kid who recommended this omnibus series to me, and after six long, gratifying volumes I have finally come to the end and feel a lot of the same mix of sadness and wonder that readers of the original series must have felt 'way back when as writer James Robinson gave his Starman, Jack Knight, one of the most remarkable and thoughtful send-offs in comicbook history.

Normally, comicbook cancellations happen after disappointing fizzles or failures, with second-string talent assigned to a flailing title, and rarely are characters given anything close to real dramatic closure. Often, they simply disappear off the stands, with the lucky ones popping up later in some more successful title for an issue or two. James Robinson was surely aware of this pattern, as his "Starman" series spotlighted a number of second-string superheroes that had met ignoble ends, and he was determined not to have that happen to his own creation.

In Omnibus 5, Jack Knight returns from an outerspace saga, and Volume 6 is devoted entirely to winding down the series, slowly and methodically with Jack and his allies confronting a grand, apocalyptic scheme staged by an army of villains, and afterwards, several issues of Jack examining his own life and his role as a superhero. At the start of the series, the character moved from cynic to hero, and gradually matured into a champion and optimist; in the final story arc, he becomes an adult, in a way that is surprisingly resonant.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
One of the things I love the most about this comic is the love the writer has for the characters, not only the big guns, but the secondary ones too. It's always a pleasure to see old pals and how much potential they do still have.
The relationships are realistically handled, even the aprioristically surreal/strange ones, funny at times, serious sometimes and generally moving.
But what really blows my mind in this series are the Shade's speeches. His speeches are superb. His use of language and rhythm is magnificent. He could be rather pedantic and obscure but, as a non-native English speaker, I have enjoyed (I still do) every single word the author makes him to say.
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