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Comment: Scuffing and wear to cover. Library copy with standard marks and labels. Binding partly split at copyright page and back page, all pages intact. Some notable staining to interior. Chipping, light staining, and discoloration on page edges. Text clear. Suitable as a reading copy if handled with care. All proceeds from purchases from BOOKsKC go to benefit the Rehabilitation Institute of Kansas City, a nonprofit organization which provides job services, training, and employment to individuals with disabilities.
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Starplace (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) School & Library Binding – December 1, 2000

4.3 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Grove (Reaching Dustin) cuts social commentary with a hint of mystery in this story set in small town Quiver, Okla., during the early '60s. Although the local junior high is not officially segregated, it remains all white until an African-American girl, Celeste Chisholm, and her professor father move into the old Teschler place, a rambling house reputed to be haunted. Celeste's enrollment causes a rift among students, and for the first time, narrator Frannie Driscoll becomes aware of the strong undercurrent of prejudice in her community. Celeste's cruel reception jolts Frannie out of her own unwillingness to make waves, and she and Celeste become friends. Quiver's sunny image is gradually shattered for Frannie, especially when she learns the horrible truth about the Teschler place, where Ku Klux Klan lynchings were once organized. The secret past of Quiver will shock most readers; the author's acknowledgments, of anonymous neighbors who found Klan "rule books" hidden in their attic, speak to the authenticity of this powerful story. Ages 10-up. (June)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-9In this powerful coming-of-age tale, written with grace and poignancy, Grove transports readers to Quiver, OK, in 1961. Thirteen-year-old Frannie Driscolls world is turned upside down by the arrival of Celeste Chisholm, the first black student in the school. Celeste is ignored by most of her classmatesuntil she sings in choir with a voice that takes ones breath away. When both girls are chosen for a special vocal ensemble, their friendship blossoms. They practice together in an abandoned playground rocket ship, a place they go to get above things, but which is unable, finally, to isolate them from the racism of the town. Celestes father, a professor, is doing research on the house he has purchasedresearch that exposes the rituals of the Ku Klux Klan and uncovers how Celestes great-grandfather was tortured to death. Racism is not limited to the past, however. When the vocal ensemble, ironically called Ladies in Harmony, is invited to a very select competition, the town fathers manage to remove Celeste from the group, and Frannies feelings about her hometown are changed forever. Even as Celeste moves away, Frannie learns that friendship survives skin color. The characterizations, particularly of Frannie and Celeste, are strong and memorable. Grove richly evokes the era of the early 60s, from Dragnet and American Bandstand to teased hair, Vietnam, and the beginning of the Womens Movement. A wonderful, well-written, multilayered novel with lots of appeal.Connie Tyrrell Burns, Mahoney Middle School, South Portland, ME
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • School & Library Binding: 214 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback (December 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0613307593
  • ISBN-13: 978-0613307598
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 4.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,328,406 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on November 14, 2002
Format: Paperback
I absolutely loved this book. It had a great message. I was reading it for a school book report. We had to write our own review too!
This book has excitement, racism, a ghost story, and even a luau! The main character is Frannie Driscoll. She is 13 (like me!) She has three best friends. Kelly, who loves horses, Margot, who thinks she's French, and Nancy, who acts like a mom. Frannie meets a new friend Celeste , who is black. Other people look down upon her. Frannie looks up upon her. Frannie sets a good example for the rest of her friends.
That's what I love about this book. Frannie shows tolerance and shows that it doesn't hurt to have a black friend. In this book there are mean examples of racism and since it's set in the 60's, no one thinks it's wrong. Well I think you'll enjoy this book. I know I did.
Oh, by the way, the starplace is an old rocket ship slide that was apart of a playground that was taken down for haunted purposes.
Thanks for reading my review!
McKenzie Lambert....
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Format: Hardcover
this book was a fast read, but it shared a meaningful message about interracial relationships in the 1960's when segregation was a very prominent issue. i found this book extremely touching and i recommend it to anyone, regardless of age! frannie and celeste share a wonderful honest relationship that no one should miss out on!
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Format: Paperback
The Starplace was a very great book. It was about a girl named Frannie who lives in a town called Quiver. The setting is back in the 1960s when there was a lot of racism. In the town of Quiver, there aren't many blacks in this town, there is a haunted house were an old man use to live. Everyone thinks that the house is haunted. One ordinary day Frannie was going to her moms work and sees a black man going out from her office. Frannie finds out that he has bought the old haunted house. The man has a daughter named Celeste. When summer break ends and Frannie and her friends go back to school, she sees Celeste at school. No one talks to her because of the color of her skin. When people pass by her in the hallway they stay at least five feet away. Celeste happens to be the first colored girl to go to the Quiver school. Frannie starts talking to her and they become the best of friends. Many other people that Frannie hangs out with talk to Celeste, too. They stick up for her and hang out with her. Celeste is a very good singer. She takes choir class with Frannie. They try out for a group for singers and they both make it. They sing all around the town of Quiver. Then when they have reauditions Celeste does not make the team because the color of her skin. This makes Frannie very upset. Frannie one day sees Celeste and her father in her backyard looking at the field behind her house. Frannie is very curious. Frannie sees them picking up something that looks like a burnt finger. Celeste tells her everything about her great grandfather that had to do with that field and a cave in the woods. Celeste and her dad moved to Quiver because her dad wanted to write a book about the cave and the field. There are many mysteries that have to do with the field and the cave.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
Racism has existed in our country/society for numerous years, and even until today, racism still exists. Frannie lives in town, in which all of the inhabitants are “white.” Celeste is an African-American girl and tries to get accustomed to her new surrounding, with Frannie’s help. Frannie learns how racism exists in her society, and also learns the problems Celeste must go through each and every day. The Starplace is a great example of how a friendship will be useful in surviving in the rough society, that people live in. People must realize that life will not be a walk in the park, but more like an endless job. This book greatly describes how people must help each other out, and pull each other through the hard times. I’m not the type of person who reads during my leisure time, but this book was very worthwhile to read. I advise all of you to read this book because this book will describe/explain to you, the importance of sharing honest, fun, and strong friendships with others.
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Format: Paperback
Set in Quiver, Oklahoma in 1961, a 13-year old girl named Frannie becomes friends with an African-American girl Celeste. Celeste is the first and only African-American student to attend Quiver Junior High School. Initially, Frannie grapples with having a friendship with Celeste or maintaining the acceptance of her peers. This friendship blossoms after the two are selected to be a part of an all-girl vocal ensemble. Through this friendship, Frannie learns a lot about prejudice, segregation, and injustice. Through Celeste's fathers' research of his genealogy, the girls realize that the town of Quiver holds a lot of secrets including include a history of Klan activity. The two girls find a secret "starplace" where thy meet and share their deepest inner most thoughts. This book falls into the genre of historical fiction. The accounts in the story are historically accurate, but unfortunately some of the actions of the characters are far too unrealistic for the time period for which the book is written. Most of the students are far too welcoming of Celeste. Also, Celeste's characterization is far too idealized, portraying her as having all positive traits. The feeling of the early 1960s is strong in spite of a few phrases and slang terms that sound more modern. This book is for middle and junior high students, but I would only use this book after careful consideration. In addition, the students would need background knowledge of Klan activity and the horrid acts committed by its members. This aspect is only slightly touched upon in the novel.
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