Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
From Stars To Stalagmites... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: From A Top Amazon Seller ( Please View Feedback). Sold and Shipped From Amazon Warehouse. *** NO HASSLE RETURNS ***
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

From Stars To Stalagmites: How Everything Connects Paperback – April 16, 2012

4.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$29.00
$23.80 $14.79

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
$29.00 FREE Shipping. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

Review

"This highly readable book does an excellent job of explaining scientific concepts in plain language, and brilliantly connects social history with scientific history and concepts. Strongly recommended for readers of all backgrounds." -- Oscar Liu, Senior Principal Scientist, Merck

"It's a terrific read and the idea of intertwining the facts of chemistry with the history and personalities of the scientists who discovered it works brilliantly." -- John Wiltshire, Systems Engineer, Nelson Gold Medallist for Creativity

"Your writings are a wonderful compilation of chemistry, history, and human endeavors. The chapter on Haber was superb! ... This text is something that every chemist should read!" --Prof Diana Mason, Regional Director and Associated Chemistry Teachers of Texas, University of North Texas

"Getting to know of atoms and molecules and their motions was not easy - Braterman pulls us into the story of the people who got us that hard-won knowledge. A superb combination of history and scientific explanation!" --Roald Hoffmann, Nobel Laureate Chemist and Writer

"Using an historical approach, From Stars to Stalagmites teaches about science in an engaging and fun manner that should appeal to interested lay readers and professionals alike." -- Richard Hirsh, Professor of History of Technology, Virginia Tech

"This book covers a lot of material very quickly and in an easy to follow style that gives the science in the context of the history and the people involved. This book is a great way to bring everything together either as an introductory overview before tackling a topic in more detail or as an enjoyable whistle stop tour through human progress and knowledge." --British Centre for Science Education Blog

"Each article is self-contained. They are well-researched showing how deeply the author has read into the background. Apart from being highly recommended for a wide adult readership, this would be an excellent book for teachers to give to students for enrichment, with the background to the chemistry going beyond the textbooks."-- Chemistry World

"On reflection some of the chapters come across as excellent materials for presentations. The book is consistently interesting and clearly written. It is a valued addition to my bookshelf and a fine example of popular science writing." --robertsaunders.org.uk

"Using an historical approach, From Stars to Stalagmites teaches about science in an engaging and fun manner that should appeal to interested lay readers and professionals alike." -- Richard Hirsh, Professor of History of Technology, Virginia Tech

"This book covers a lot of material very quickly and in an easy to follow style that gives the science in the context of the history and the people involved. This book is a great way to bring everything together either as an introductory overview before tackling a topic in more detail or as an enjoyable whistle stop tour through human progress and knowledge." --British Centre for Science Education Blog

"Each article is self-contained. They are well-researched showing how deeply the author has read into the background. Apart from being highly recommended for a wide adult readership, this would be an excellent book for teachers to give to students for enrichment, with the background to the chemistry going beyond the textbooks."-- Chemistry World

"On reflection some of the chapters come across as excellent materials for presentations. The book is consistently interesting and clearly written. It is a valued addition to my bookshelf and a fine example of popular science writing."-- robertsaunders.org.uk

"... is extremely readable, even for those with limited scientific training... An excellent resource for general readers with a wide interest in all aspects of natural science." --CHOICE

"Using an historical approach, From Stars to Stalagmites teaches about science in an engaging and fun manner that should appeal to interested lay readers and professionals alike." -- Richard Hirsh, Professor of History of Technology, Virginia Tech

"This book covers a lot of material very quickly and in an easy to follow style that gives the science in the context of the history and the people involved. This book is a great way to bring everything together either as an introductory overview before tackling a topic in more detail or as an enjoyable whistle stop tour through human progress and knowledge." --British Centre for Science Education Blog

From the Inside Flap

Feynman once selected, as the single most important statement in science, that everything is made of atoms. It follows that the properties of everything depend on how these atoms are joined together, giving rise to the vast field we know of today as chemistry. In this unique book specifically written to bridge the gap between chemistry and the layman, Braterman has put together a series of linked essays on chemistry related themes that are particularly engaging.

The book begins with the age of the earth, and concludes with the life cycle of stars. In between, there are atoms old and new, the ozone hole mystery and how it was solved, synthetic fertilisers and explosives, reading the climate record, the extraction of metals, the wetness of water, and how the greenhouse effect on climate really works. A chapter in praise of uncertainty leads on to the "fuzziness" and sharing of electrons, and from there to molecular shape, grass-green and blood-red, the wetness of water, and molecular recognition as the basis of life.

Organised in such a way as to illustrate and develop underlying principles and approaches, this book will appeal to anyone interested in chemistry, as well as its history and key personalities. Where many other titles have failed, this book succeeds brilliantly in capturing the spirit and essence of chemistry and delivering the science in easily digestible terms.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company (June 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9814324973
  • ISBN-13: 978-9814324977
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #789,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
88%
4 star
12%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a mechanical and materials engineer who considers her chemistry high school experience to have made her switch from a liberal arts degree to engineering. The professor took the periodic table and would relate stories of the origin of the elements. Over the course of the year, I found that I would skip many classes but never his. I felt the same way reading Paul Braterman's book. He draws out stories about the basis for what we are dealing with today but in todays environment of spin, here comes a refreshing style of informing through stories, connections and making the entire learning experience a wonderful journey. I have found both teens, adults without a scientific career and scientists can benefit from reading this book. Can I say that I am particularly happy that I could sift through and pick a chapter and topic and go back and forth with no loss of experience. I simply enjoyed the historical context, the stories one could share over dinner about scientists, their life, the context of their discoveries etc. This is a fireside read book that leaps off the coffee table often!
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Paul Braterman’s book starts out by discussing simple chemistry concepts through how they were developed historically. He gives enough personal information about the people involved to make his discussions of discovery and problem solving interesting. He describes the messy way in which science actually progresses, as opposed to the hypothetical “scientific method.”

This then leads to discussions of more complex chemistry-related issues, such as why grass is green and blood is red, how water gets its properties and how important they are, how the Periodic Table helps to understand how things are the way they are, how metals got isolated, how we learned about ozone depletion, and the causes of global warming, among other interesting chemistry-related issues.

The book includes a glossary and an excellent index, but unfortunately has endnotes instead of footnotes, which is particularly frustrating when the notes are a mixture of interesting comments and dull citations to obscure literature that I will never peruse. This means that I have to flip to the end of the book each time to see which type of endnote is being offered. If they were at the bottom of the page on which they occur, this would not be necessary.

Braterman’s book is somewhat like taking a refresher course in college chemistry with a serving of quantum mechanics. I recommend it to anyone interested in the many ways that chemistry matters to us.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
From Stars To Stalagmites is Paul Braterman's first non-technical book, and let us hope that it will not be his last. This book is a very good read about some of the most important events and ideas in the history of chemistry and scientific thought. The chapters are well put together, with sections that build upon the most important points that the author attempts to make. If the reader does have some issues about a few of the technical aspects, there is a glossary in the back, along with notes and references. Paul definitely has the ability to tell a story, and when writing about science, he is the rare type of writer that knows how to strategically incorporate humor. He is also not afraid to present his views on some of the more controversial subjects that we as a species face in the modern world. I highly recommend this book for anybody who is proficiently knowledgeable in science, and I also recommend it to those who are not quite as knowledgeable in science, but have the desire to be.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Most popular science books about how the universe works are heavy on the physics; this is the first book that gives equal weight
to chemistry (which will no doubt turn some people off). Does of very good job of describing the interface between them, and
discussing the real-world implications of the chemistry.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

From Stars To Stalagmites: How Everything Connects
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: From Stars To Stalagmites: How Everything Connects