Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Start Shooting

4.1 out of 5 stars 75 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
Customers also viewed these available items
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • ISBN-10: 0385534701
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385534703
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Lisa Baker VINE VOICE on December 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
3.5 Stars
Still shaking my head.

This is a complex, gritty, somewhat confusing, twisted type of police procedural. I have read CALUMET CITY and his writing remains excellent but this story, I thought, was much harder to follow.

The entire story takes place over 6 days and chronicles sick childhood tragedies that are connected in the end. The main characters in the book are two brothers, Rubin and Bobby who are both police officers and twin sisters Arleen and Colleen, (who was brutally raped and murdered at 13 years old). Tie in the darkness of the south side of Chicago, the bid for the Chicago Olympics, many different and deadly gangs, some really mad and bad Korean's, crooked cops, a large Japanese conglomerate and an adult orphan kicked out of a seminary, and this will give you a summary of why I thought it was so confusing and convoluted.

I thought the author just went overboard trying to tell so many different stories and then have them connect in the end. He could have just simplified it and the story would have been so much better.

I did love the dialog with Bobby and his brother, and with Arleen and Bobby. I also liked how the author moves into a Cain and Abel transformation with the brothers as the book progresses. I thought the last half of the book was much better then the first half as you finally get some idea of what the heck is going on.

I really liked the ending, but it took too long to finally get there.

This book will NOT appeal to anyone who is turned off by extreme violence and incest. This book will appeal to you if you like your police procedural's dark and constantly moving. Again, he writes extremely well, I just didn't care for this particular story.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Chicago has been chosen as the Olympic City of 2016. The action begins in the gang dominated neighborhood known as Four Corners. Two brothers, Ruben and Bobby Vargas, grow up there and enter the police department.

Coleen Brennan was an Irish girl who befriended Bobby Vargas, who was Spanish. By the sixth grade, they had become boyfriend and girlfriend. His worst day was when Coleen was murdered when she was age thirteen. Coleen was white and Bobby wasn't. Their friendship was a dangerous thing in the race rules of Four Corners.

One day, the "Chicago Herald," a newspaper in need of a big story, runs an expose, implying that it would prove that Bobby and Ruben killed Coleen.

The story has an interesting literary style with chapters beginning with portions of the newspaper expose and then moving to the actions of the current day. Coleen's murder is said to be a reprisal for racist policing but there is also a question if she was raped and left to die as part of a gang initiation.

Anton Dupree was arrested, tried and convicted of the murder. He was later executed and his family is suing the city claiming that Anton was of low intellignece and manipulated into confessing.

With the existing political climate, Bobby fears that the city will settle the suit and that he and his brother will be fired and face civil action.

There are a number of levels in the story which is told in a darkly realistically manner. There was a past history of wrong doing by Japan during WWII. Currently, representatives of the company active in the wrong doing are influential in financing the Olympics. In addition, Coleen's twin sister Arleen, returns and becomes romantically involved with Bobby.
Read more ›
14 Comments 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
You want a safe story with predictable characters and an obvious ending? You want a literary "product" built to appeal to the masses? Pick another book. There's plenty out there. "Start Shooting" is another beast. This is a story about hopes and dreams, and the characters are so real, so compelling you'll be white-knuckling the chair as you read, praying for someone--anyone--in this messed-up world to come out a winner. The action is wild, but the writing is even better. Go slow and breathe it in. Charlie Newton makes you fall in love with his characters. Then he puts guns in their hands and tells them they better start shooting if they want to save the things they care about most in life. The action never stops, the tension ratchets higher and higher, and the characters get richer by the page. Think of Jonathan Franzen, but with issues.
This is a mind-blowing book. If you love a good story and you're not afraid to think and feel for yourself, welcome to "Start Shooting." You'll be glad you came.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
"Start Shooting" is about as intense an experience as I've ever had following a plot on the printed page. Pulse-pounding fiction is an understatement; they should use this for CPR.

Yeah, the book's not perfect. It gets where it's going on the backs of some coincidences the author doesn't go back and explain well, and a tendency to push the action to 11 in every chapter gets a bit numbing here and there. But it reminds me of some of those dog-eared plots Ed McBain, a.k.a. the late Evan Hunter, used to drive his amazing novels, with weaknesses that didn't matter because the action was so good. After a while of Charlie Newton flipping cards on you like an ace street hustler out to entertain rather than cheat you, you recognize the intensity of his commitment and just ride with it.

The title is the first unusual thing about the novel, though apt enough as you discover. Written for the most part in the present tense, the narrative slips deftly back and forth between two characters. One, a cop named Bobby Vargas from a tough Chicago neighborhood named Four Corners, just wants to do the right thing and live up to the example of his cool older brother Ruben, a detective. The other is Arleen Brennan, a struggling actress who grew up in the same neighborhood in the shadow of a murdered twin sister. A lifetime separates them, but now a twisted plot involving blackmail and murder on a mass scale brings them together to fight demons they didn't know they had, some from the past and others all too much in the present.

What makes "Start Shooting" work so well is how cleverly Newton works his alternating points-of-view. Because you are seeing a case develop from two different perspectives, you can see it coming together before they do.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews