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The Station of No Station: Open Secrets of the Sufis Paperback – March 30, 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Henry Bayman is an American engineer who has lived in Turkey for the past twenty-five years. He is a student of Sufism and an independent scholar. He is the author of The Secret of Islam.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: North Atlantic Books (March 30, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1556432402
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556432408
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,370,373 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Hafizullah Chishti on December 23, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As one other reviewer has said, this is not a good intro to Sufism. There is no real esoteric teaching here. Nevertheless, it is instructive, but more from the standpoint of style and process than from content.
There was a great deal of polemic against Nietzsche and pop culture, and of idolizing of his shaikh. From a random opening/scanning of the text, I was expecting a concise introduction to the Lata'if, the Sufi framework of subtle centers which are not chakras but something of a different and subtler order. What there was instead was a mention of the lata'if but no real background on their function in the development of the human being.
The polemic was an annoyance after a while. It took up too much bandwidth, even though I'm no particular fan if Nietzsche and tend to agree with the author on the corrosiveness of junk culture and the profanity of the present materialistic society.
The skillful teacher will set an atmosphere of beauty and sacredness into which those present are *invited* by the appeal to the heart and the sacred within oneself. Here, one feels bludgeoned about what is wrong with things (and onself) as the encouragement to undertake a spiritual study.
The tone of many passages discloses a lack of real assimilation of the Teachings and individuation of the true ego. The author has swallowed the Teachings whole and is living them mechanistically instead of from his own developed depth. That is not bad in itself; it is a developmental stage that one has either crossed or not. But one cannot teach in this Way (nor should one be writing books on it) until that process is well-along -- and it had barely started (IMO) when the book was written.
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Format: Paperback
The Station Of No Station, in essence speaks from the very heart of Islam... The Pure Islam, which was practiced by the Prophet Muhammad himself. Henry Bayman, who has a profound understanding of Islamic Sufism, spent most of the last quarter of the twentieth century with the great grandfather of Islamic Sufism "Ahmet Kayhan". In this contemporary book of authentic wisdom, Mr.Bayman has in a sincere, direct and clear manner colourfully explained and presented those very Pure Teachings of Islamic Sufism. This book is without any doubt essential for anyone interested in spirituality, religion, mysticism and love... In the words of the great Sufi saint "Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi"... "I follow the religion of love: whatever way loves mounts take, that is my religion and my faith".
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By A Customer on September 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
As excellent as this book is, it is not an Introduction to Sufism. The reader must decide: Is it my heart I want touched, or my head? If it is the head, then the surveys by Chittick, Knysh, and Haeri are in order. If it is the heart, R. Frager's Heart, Soul, Self, is probably the best book out there.
One might place Bayman after Frager, but Bayman is short on detail where Frager explains in great care. But in a word, Bayman begins to treat certain post-basics elements in more depth, but too often stops short. Moreover, Bayman's Sufism is firmly rooted in Islam; his Sufism is serious stuff, not the deracinated Universal Religion of New Agers.
Bayman spends a good deal of space analyzing Nietzsche and where his failed Death of God and unrealizable Superman have led Western Civilization to the point of self anhilation. Sufism contains psychological elements derived hundreds of years ago that Western "Psychology" cannot grapple with, and hence Sufism offers a spiritual alternative to the malaise affecting Western - and now Globalized - Civilization.
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Format: Paperback
The Station of No Station is a message of faith and hope from the teachings of Islamic Sufism. In a thoughtful and meditative manner, Henry Bayman shows how true Islam is distinguished from both paranoid and romantic fantasies, and how Sufism constitutes a body of knowledge that starts with accepted science and extends beyond it.

Going through the book in a thoughtful manner makes for a wonderful devotional process.
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