Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Stations Of The Sun Paperback – June 28, 2001

4.6 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.76 $11.35

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

..".a highly readable text that will serve the scholar and general reader alike to provide the first truly complete survey of the history of communal, seasonal rites and customs....In this engaging exploration his work will be useful to students of popular culture and literature, folklorists,
historians, and even the old-fashioned enthusiast."--Journal of Ritual Studies
..".a breath of much-needed fresh air...a well-organized, methodical analysis..."--American Reporter
"This book, with its rich combination of history and folklore, is a valuable work of reference."--American Historical Review


,.".a highly readable text that will serve the scholar and general reader alike to provide the first truly complete survey of the history of communal, seasonal rites and customs....In this engaging exploration his work will be useful to students of popular culture and literature, folklorists,
historians, and even the old-fashioned enthusiast."--Journal of Ritual Studies
,.".a breath of much-needed fresh air...a well-organized, methodical analysis..."--American Reporter
"This book, with its rich combination of history and folklore, is a valuable work of reference."--American Historical Review



, .."a highly readable text that will serve the scholar and general reader alike to provide the first truly complete survey of the history of communal, seasonal rites and customs....In this engaging exploration his work will be useful to students of popular culture and literature, folklorists,
historians, and even the old-fashioned enthusiast."--Journal of Ritual Studies
, .."a breath of much-needed fresh air...a well-organized, methodical analysis..."--American Reporter
"This book, with its rich combination of history and folklore, is a valuable work of reference."--American Historical Review


.,."a highly readable text that will serve the scholar and general reader alike to provide the first truly complete survey of the history of communal, seasonal rites and customs....In this engaging exploration his work will be useful to students of popular culture and literature, folklorists, historians, and even the old-fashioned enthusiast."--Journal of Ritual Studies
.,."a breath of much-needed fresh air...a well-organized, methodical analysis..."--American Reporter
"This book, with its rich combination of history and folklore, is a valuable work of reference."--American Historical Review



."..a highly readable text that will serve the scholar and general reader alike to provide the first truly complete survey of the history of communal, seasonal rites and customs....In this engaging exploration his work will be useful to students of popular culture and literature, folklorists, historians, and even the old-fashioned enthusiast."--Journal of Ritual Studies
."..a breath of much-needed fresh air...a well-organized, methodical analysis..."--American Reporter
"This book, with its rich combination of history and folklore, is a valuable work of reference."--American Historical Review

About the Author

Ronald Hutton is Reader in History at the University of Bristol.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; New Ed edition (June 28, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192854488
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192854483
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 1.4 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #933,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is a great source for information about British customs and lore. Hutton is excited about his subject and holds it in deep regard all the wile telling us the way it really is. I learned a lot from this book and I consider it essential reading for everyone (especially neo-pagans) who has an interest in this subject.
As a neo-pagan I wouldn't want to have this vast subject explained to me in one sentence - I want examples as to why a certain custom or seasonal festival is important/necessary in the wheel of the year. Ialso want sources states because if someone were to just say to me "Everything you have read about British seasonal customs is wrong" I would say, "Prove it". Hutton indeed takes the time to prove his arguments.
Hutton isn't against neo-pagans, but he is _for_ scholarship.
Comment 51 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not for a casual reader. It is, instead, a compendium of primary source information for those curious about the calendar year in Britain. It's fascinating scholarship and absolutely authoratative in its research, but not for "just reading"! At some points, the paragraphs are so thick with citations and details that my eyes began to gloss. In general, though, the prose remains readable, even when detailing minutia.

I do want to address one criticism from an earlier reviewer, who said this about the book:

"Hutton debunks everything he presents; after a while it kind of got on my nerves. Virtually every description and explanation is followed by some sort of 'but this probably didn't happen' or 'this probably wasn't really the way it was' disclaimer. fter reading several chapters, my attitude morphed into 'why are you wasting my time telling me about stuff that didn't happen? Can't you tell me about anything that probably DID happen?'"

I'm not sure if this reviewer and I were reading the same book. Yes, Hutton debunks many myths surrounding these customs, but to say that he provides no information on what DID happen, or how it happened, is bunk. The book is thick with information, a real brick of scholarship. There are ten chapters alone on the evidence of various Christmas and New years traditions!

Those with a serious interest in the development of many Western calendar customs in Britain (many of which are also the ultimate root of our American traditions) should definitely add this boo to their collections.
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A very scholarly work on the origins and customs surrounding the holidays in Britain. This book has been a bit of a "tough read" for me as I worked through the dry parts of interest to folklorists between the parts of interest to genealogists. As an American, I had to have Guy Fawkes Night explained to me. As a genealogist working with UK sources, it's nice to understand what Rogationtide and Candlemas are, for instance.
In general, the book attempts to overturn the classical folklorist mistakes in the sources and symbolism of holidays dating back to Sir James Frazer's Golden Bough. Not every custom and tradition is a direct descendant of Celtic religious rites. Humanity has been very adaptable to inventing new "old traditions" as the need arises and our earlier ancestors where just as good at fulfilling these needs as were the Victorians who invented our concept of an "old fashioned Christmas".
Comment 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on August 22, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is probably the most accurate and well-researched book on the history of the ritual year in Britain that you could hope to read. It is also well-written, fascinating, and full of source material for further thought and study. It examines the origins and development of major festivals, and dispels a few myths along the way. It has a wealth of detail without becoming bogged down in it, and the prose is often lyrical. Highly recommended.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is far and away the best book on the subject! Meticulously researched, I give it my highest recommendation -- especially for Neo-Pagans. It's a wonderful antidote for the misinformation so common in pop histories.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The most exciting insight I received from this book is just how quickly traditions change from generation to generation. This insight has been helpful to me in reading primary documents in other areas of research.

I am a Neopagan, and I'm always interested to know where the sources of commonly held beliefs really lie. What I find is that a large percentage of the practices and meanings associated with the Neopagan holiday cycle are Medieval in origin, or later, and changed rapidly thenceforward.

I'm okay with this knowledge. Wicca, my religion, definitely evolved in an Abrahamic environment and is compatible with Medieval material. I can understand why some modern Pagans would be frustrated to learn how little can really be discerned about their parent cultures, though.

The most useful element to this work is the fact that Hutton details the source material available to readers, AND provides his assessment of their reliability. He gives good reasons for these assessments. The reader isn't obligated to accept his line of reasoning, and the great thing is that one can go back and read those other sources and get a more detailed picture.

I think the Pagan community needs to remember that secondary and tertiary sources are not acceptable as "proof" of anything. Secondary source material is helpful to suggest lines of interpretation. Tertiary source material, like histories written for general readership, can only summarize the opinions of scholars and select from among them the ones that seem most reasonable to the author at the time. In other words, just because half a dozen tertiary sources agree on an interpretation does not make that opinion more believable. It only makes it more popular.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: czech history, modern world history