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Stigmata Repackaged

4.0 out of 5 stars 680 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

In this taut, thought-provoking thriller, a young woman is being mysteriously attacked by supernatural forces and it's up to a Vatican envoy to find out whether the incidents are divine or demonic!

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Gabriel Byrne plays Father Kiernan, a young Jesuit priest whose degree in chemistry makes him a sort of priest/detective as he investigates weeping Marys and the like around the world. Meanwhile, Frankie (Patricia Arquette), a rave-generation Pittsburgher, is afflicted with the stigmata--holes that appear in her wrists, resembling the wounds of Christ. The young woman's symptoms filter back to the Vatican and Father Kiernan is assigned to the case. The priest is puzzled by Frankie's atheism; usually the stigmata only appear on the devout (hence the age-old controversy of miracles vs. hysteria). Other manifestations appear on Frankie, and the priest's cardinal (Jonathan Pryce) is brought in, leading to political maneuvering within the Church hierarchy. The film owes a large and obvious debt to The Exorcist (at one point, Frankie's bed scoots across the room and she levitates into a crucifix position), but to term it an Exorcist rip-off would be to shortchange Stigmata. The premise and screenplay are more cerebral than in the l973 film, and the source of the phenomenon is coming from a completely different place.

Unfortunately, amid Stigmata's high-octane editing and slick technique, the chills of The Exorcist aren't there, giving the movie a sort of identity crisis: horror movie or intellectual thriller? Several elements of the film challenge basic tenets of the Catholic faith, hence the brief furor that erupted at the time of the film's release; if nothing else, the internal workings of the Church are shown in a very unflattering light indeed. Byrne excels as the skeptical priest, as does Arquette as the tortured young woman. All told, Stigmata is a rather uneven effort, but one with a thought-provoking combination of theology and thrills served up in a thoroughly modern, stylish package. Fans of TV's Ally McBeal will recognize Portia DeRossi in a supporting role. --Jerry Renshaw


Special Features

  • Deleted Scenes
  • Director's Alternate Ending
  • Natalie Imbruglia Music Video
  • Collectible 8-Page Booklet

Product Details

  • Actors: Patricia Arquette, Gabriel Byrne, Jonathan Pryce, Nia Long, Thomas Kopache
  • Directors: Rupert Wainwright
  • Writers: Rick Ramage, Tom Lazarus
  • Producers: Frank Mancuso Jr., Vikki Williams
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    R
    Restricted
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: September 14, 2010
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (680 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305718954
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,927 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Stigmata Repackaged" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
O.K., so in the past year or so I have found that I don't enjoy the movies that get "Thumbs up". If I want to see "real life", I'll look out the window. When I pay to see a movie I want to be entertained. So I was expecting to like this movie (since critics didn't). But what I saw was a movie that was extremely well acted by ALL involved, a movie that was beautifully photographed (with some amazing shots throughout)and a truly brave story line that was sure to alienate a HUGE market share.
I can't possibly imagine what the critics did not like about this well paced, well acted thriller.
At the least it is the most underrated movie of the year.
One note...Inside the booklet that comes in the DVD case, there is a letter from the Director. It explains that the DVD comes with an alternate ending, and to please watch the entire movie WITH the alternate ending (as opposed to watching the alternate ending as a seperate scene after viewing the theatrical version). And sure enough, when you click "play movie" from the main menu, you must make a choice. Go with the directors cut. I viewed the theatrical ending after I watched the directors cut, and the film lost it's impact.
The transfer to DVD is excellent, and the sound is fine. There is nothing muddy or muddled about this movie. And although the subject of stigmata has been handled before,I guarantee that you have never seen it handled like this. I was thoroughly entertained from start to finish by this fine movie. If you are on the fence about buying stigmata, go for it. It's the best thriller I have seen in a while.
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Format: DVD
This DVD features a gorgeous 2.35:1 widescreen transfer, capturing all of the films beauty. STIGMATA is probably the most gorgeously filmed movie EVER, and the DVD edition is great. The added scenes are great, the alternate ending is VERY interesting, and the Natalie Imbruglia music video, for the truly haunting "Identify", is moody and luscious. For open-minded viewers, Stigmata is a great pick. And for the record, it does NOT rip off The Exorcist, as the Exorcist did not INVENT "possession signals", such as talking in a strange deeper voice, speaking different languages, or facial contortions; these have been documented phenomena in MANY TRUE POSSESSION CASES. Just wanted to clear that up. Patricia Arquette is brilliant.
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Format: DVD
"Stigmata" is a great movie. Patricia Arquette stars as a young woman in the U.S. who shows signs of stigmata. A priest from the Vatican links up with her and cares for her as she is increasingly afflicted by the stigmata. Her ranting and raving finally begins to make sense to the priest who starts to question what his religion has stood for. This movie is good on its own account, but I love it because it introduced me to "The Gospel of Thomas," the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Nag Hammadi Bible.
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By A Customer on February 16, 2000
Format: DVD
Stigmata is a delicate movie to the extent that it provokes emotions and opinions along the two extremes of the scale. One thing is for sure: your feelings are bound to be strong about this movie. As far as context and message are concerned, the base topic about faith and church is old enough; the conclusion is somewhat more fresh, though far from being as radical as intended. Anyway, if you do not look too deep into the theoretical side of it, the message is viable and elegantly presented.
What IS outstanding about Stigmata is acting. Indeed, Patricia Arquette gives one of her best performances as fate-struck Frankie; Jonathan Pryce excels at the role of the smooth-mannered evil cardinal; and... yes, my favourite Irishman... Gabriel Byrne is just dazzling as self-denying Father Kiernan. No doubt, he is the spiritual and emotional centre of the whole story, and he suggests that in a gentle, elegant way throughout the film. Paradoxically, Byrne calls the viewer to root for his character even more than Arquette does for her own victim figure. Director Rupert Wainwright also deserves applause for tactful storyhandling, beautiful imaging, and, very importantly, for leaving space for his actors to play out their characters in their full complexity. I think, to finish with, that this movie is a fine one and well worth seeing on DVD, but certainly not for the weak.
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Format: DVD
When I first saw the commercials back when Stigmata was released, I cringed at the thought of a "Next Exorcist". I avoided the film up until TBS finally broadcasted it earlier this year, and I was amazed by it.
If you go into the movie believing it's the "Next Exorcist" plot-wise, you will be horribly disappointed. The only ties between the two movies are the use and discussion of religion, religious beliefs, and figures, and possession itself. The experiences of both Frankie Paige (Patricia Arquette) and the Exorcist's leading character, Reagan (Linda Blair) are drastically different. Whereas Reagan was possessed by a demonic spirit for cruel reasons of it's own, Frankie experiences an extremely different sort of possession. Frankie became possessed by the spirit of a recently deceased priest, Paolo Alameida.
Father Alameida, along with two other priests, had been working together to translate a document found near the site of the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in Jerusalem. The document is entirely in Aramaic - the language believed to be used during the time of Jesus. The three priests begin to believe that the words in this document are actually words spoken by the living Jesus Christ at the time of his last supper, telling his Disciples how to continue his church after his crucifixion.
Once word began to spread in the Catholic church about the gospel (and how damaging it's content would be to the church itself), the three priests were discommunicated and exiled, with Father Alameida relocating to Bel Quinto, Brazil, where he would head a church, and eventually commit suicide before the translation was finished.
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