Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Strange of Idols Pattern & Other Short Stories Import

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Import, August 25, 2003
"Please retry"
$94.33 $37.36
Vinyl
"Please retry"
$69.99

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started

Editorial Reviews

Full Title - The Strange Idols Pattern & Other Short Stories. 2003 reissue of Felt's third album that's unavailable domestically. Originally issued in 1984, it includes the indie chart hit 'Sunlight Bathed The Golden Glow' & it's packaged in a limited edi

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Roman Litter
  2. Sempiternal Darkness
  3. Spanish House
  4. Imprint
  5. Sunlight Bathed The Golden Glow
  6. Vasco Da Gama
  7. Crystal Ball
  8. Dismantled King Is Off The Throne
  9. Whirlpool Vision Of Shame


Product Details

  • Audio CD: 390 pages (August 25, 2003)
  • 390 pages
  • Original Release Date: 1984
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Cherry Red UK
  • ASIN: B0000AJ5S6
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #411,653 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Skatalites Store

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By C. Romney on September 23, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I was pleasantly surprised when my girlfriend put this album on tonight. Our tastes are often quite different, but this record is great. Comparisons to Tom Verlaine and Television immediately came to mind, and sometimes I was reminded of Johnny Marr's work with the Smiths. I can't vouch for any other of their records, but this one is brilliant.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
"Strange Idols" marks a significant development in Felt's evolution. Firstly, this is the album where drummer Gary Ainge ditched his cymbal-less, Moe Tucker tom pounding style, and adopted a conventional set-up with a cracking snare drum and high-hat. This changed Felt's sound profoundly, making it more conventionally poppy in feel. Secondly, songs are sped up and shortened to the 3 ½ minute mark, eschewing the mesmerizing but lengthy, noodling passages of previous albums, while adhering more closely to verse-chorus-verse pop structure. Thirdly, producer John Leckie provides a bright, crisp, crystal clear sound, stripping away the dark, gauzy atmosphere that characterized prior releases. I'm not sure if Leckie deserves the credit or if Felt was already headed that way, but this was as bold of a leap forward as the Go-Betweens huge growth-spurt from "Send Me a Lullaby" to "Before Hollywood." The brooding, reverb-soaked atmosphere of earlier efforts suited Felt beautifully, but this newfound brightness opens them up to countless new possibilities in pop's pastures.

But do all these changes mean Felt sold out? Hardly.

Felt's basic MO remains: lead guitarist Maurice Deebank still spins gloriously melodic, shimmeringly ornate, and dexterously intricate melodies over singer Lawrence Heyward's lush, acoustic-strummed chords, all interspersed by the latter's cool Lou Reed meets Tom Verlaine vocals. But rather than sound like two guys jamming in a bedroom, they place this in the context of three minute pop, and the results are absolutely stunning. If anything, this new adherence to conventional pop structure brings out even more of the aching beauty in Deebank and Heyward's playing.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This is in my opinion, hands down, the best early Felt album. Maurice Deebank's guitar shines. The guitar interplay is bright, concise & sharp, & unlike the subsequent 1985 album Ignite The Seven Cannons, which also features the guitar interplay of Lawrence & Deebank, the tones are clean & unmuddied. If you're buying the Felt re-issues, this release is #3. Like the rest, it comes in a thin cardboard jacket with minimal artwork & no liner notes, & which usually include only a single B&W picture of Lawrence on the interior gatefold. As an overall effect, I like what they have done with the packaging, although I tend to prefer the uniformity of a standard Jewel case for releases which I collect. This is actually Felt's first full length album.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Criminally overlooked during their existence in the 1980s, Felt and their legacy continue to operate outside the mainstream. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, as Felt constitute the epitome of what a true cult classic is in every sense of the term- largley unknown, enigmatic frontman, extensive catalog, committed fan base, and some of the most gorgeous pop music ever created firmly establish Felt's credentials. Knowing about them is like being privy to a well-kept secret. To the initiated, Felt is held in the highest regard, standing head and shoulders above such contemporaries as The Smiths, The Cure, Echo and the Bunnymen, and other post-punk bands. Taking their cues from the likes of The Velvet Underground and Television, Felt adopted elements of both but managed to avoid sounding derivative, creating their own unique sound and vision.

The Strange Idols Pattern and Other Short Stories is one of Felt's best records and stands as a fine entry point to the band and their music. It marks the point where their unique brand of gloom/dream-pop coalesced into a solid album's worth of material from start to finish. Whereas previous efforts Crumbling the Antiseptic Beauty and The Splendour of Fear offered primitive charm and promise, Strange Idols fully delivers on that promise. The songs themselves bask in an elegant, lysergic glow thanks to John Leckie's masterful, uncluttered production which allows the band space to breathe and push's singer Lawrence's hyper-literate, poetic vocals to the front. Guitars ring and chine incessantly on such Felt classics as 'Sunlight Bathed the Golden Glow', 'Dismantled King is Off the Throne', and 'Whirlpool Vision of Shame' courtesy of the talented and underrated Maurice Deebank. These are the types of songs R.E.M.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?