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The Strange World of Quantum Mechanics 1st Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0521667807
ISBN-10: 0521667801
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"...gives a clear account of Feynman's approach. At times this is quite compelling....If you are looking for an original account of Feynman's approach, I recommend this book." Nature

"Strange World is well-written, engaging, pared-down, precise and accurate on technical matters; it conveys the author's enthusiasm for the subject well, and is a product of careful thought and successful pedagogy." American Journal of Physics

Book Description

Quantum mechanics appears strange and unfamiliar. However, for those who open their minds to the way in which nature really behaves - instead of clinging to preconceptions of how nature 'ought' to behave - the rules governing the domain of the very small are consistent, logical, and even delightful. This exceptionally accessible, accurate and non-technical account contains thought-provoking problems and suggestions for further reading. Suitable for use as a course text, it enables students to develop a genuine understanding of this subject. It will also appeal to general readers seeking intellectual adventure.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 172 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (February 28, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521667801
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521667807
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 0.4 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,092,067 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

By Duwayne Anderson on July 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
Imagine being raised all your life in an environment without gravity and then suddenly finding yourself on a planet with a strong gravitational field. Things would be really strange. Your intuition would be confused and confounded. Take the simple act of tossing a ball, for example. Your intuition tells you that the ball will go straight, but in this strange world the ball curves. To toss the ball to someone you must toss it up, so that it arcs over. Otherwise, if you toss it straight (like your intuition tells you to) it curves downward and hits the ground.
Strangeness, obviously, depends on our sense of intuition, and our sense of intuition depends upon the rules of engagement in the world in which we live. Most of us live in a world dominated by classical physics where objects have a definite position, velocity, mass, energy, etc. It is because of our intimate personal experience with this classical world that non-classical environments like the very fast and the very tiny seem counter intuitive.
Styer's book aims to help the reader understand the experiences of the quantum world. Though real quantum intuition cannot come from a book, Styer helps the reader gain a measure of intuition regarding what happens at the quantum level. Styer's book is one of the best I've seen for explaining quantum mechanics in a rigorously qualitative manner that's understandable by virtually anyone with the intellectual discipline to learn new ideas. [The other book I recommend in this area, and from which Styer uses as a frequent reference, is "QED, The Strange Theory of Light and Matter," by Richard Feynman. For someone just starting out in his or her study of quantum mechanics, I recommend Feynman's book followed by Styer's.
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By A Customer on December 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
This little book explains the EPR-Paradox in perhaps the clearest presentation I have ever seen! It's a fun read, too... It makes a good companion to Feynman's "QED". I recommend it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first discovered this book on amazon several years ago but I didn't buy it then because the reviews were mixed and I felt the book was too short to be useful. Having just finished it, I regret not reading it sooner - it's one of the best books you can read if you're looking to understand the basic concepts without college math. The book is so short because it's concise and gets right to the point- if you're looking for history and the personalities involved, then look elsewhere. As a previous reviewer noted, the problems are an essential part of the learning process and only require high-school math.

For an equally good introduction, but one with an entirely different focus (wave mechanics vs. 2-state spin), I'd recommend Fayer's "Absolutely Small" (2010). For those looking to learn the actual math, Susskind's Quantum Mechanics (2014) is the best introduction for laymen.
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