& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Strangers Almanac by Whis... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Previously listened to, but still suitable for use. There may be minor scratches, but all tracks are playable. No missing booklets. PRIME SHIPPING.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Strangers Almanac by Whiskeytown (1997)

4.5 out of 5 stars 75 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, July 29, 1997
"Please retry"
$7.93
$2.54 $1.47
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Provided by Amazon Digital Services LLC. Terms and Conditions. Does not apply to gift orders.
Complete your purchase to save the MP3 version to your music library.

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started
$7.93 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Strangers Almanac by Whiskeytown (1997)
  • +
  • Pneumonia
  • +
  • Faithless Street
Total price: $23.91
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Includes FREE MP3 version of this album Here's how (restrictions apply)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

STRANGERS ALMANAC

Amazon.com

Strangers Almanac first grabs you because it sounds so great. It's filled with dynamic performances that smolder moodily, then flare quickly into firestorms of twangy and soulful guitar rock that fuse Uncle Tupelo with the Stones, the Replacements, with Gram Parsons. But what makes this album essential are the songs of frontman Ryan Adams. Take "Houses On The Hill," about a man merely going through a box of old letters: in just two verses, and to a melody that's the definition of bittersweet, Adams relates a drama more rich in detail than most novels. One of '97's best albums. --David Cantwell
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
5:51
Listen Now $0.99
 
2
30
3:14
Listen Now $0.99
 
3
30
2:49
Listen Now $0.99
 
4
30
3:54
Listen Now $1.29
 
5
30
4:31
Listen Now $0.99
 
6
30
2:38
Listen Now $0.99
 
7
30
5:16
Listen Now $0.99
 
8
30
4:38
Listen Now $0.99
 
9
30
3:54
Listen Now $0.99
 
10
30
2:31
Listen Now $0.99
 
11
30
4:00
Listen Now $0.99
 
12
30
2:30
Listen Now $0.99
 
13
30
5:54
Listen Now $0.99
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 29, 1997)
  • Original Release Date: July 29, 1997
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Outpost
  • ASIN: B000002RBZ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,568 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Whiskeytown Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I was young and in love in the early twenties with a woman I thought I was going to marry. She left and I was suddenly lost. One of my roomates loved this album. She said it was one of the best albums she had ever heard. I listened to it and it made no impression what so ever. Then, I listened to it after I had experienced some real emotional pain...
I drank a lot for three months, a lot of bourbon actually, and this was the album I listened to at 2, 3, or 4 o'clock in the morning. Songs like Inn Town, Excuse Me While I Break My Own Heart Tonight, 16 Days, and Everything I Do dredged the pain up nightly and made me deal with it.
Maybe the album is only for certain people at certain times in their lives. But more than once I have been in the used CD section of a record store and saw someone looking at Stranger's Almanac by Whiskeytown. I always walk up to that person and say, "You know, I don't know who you are, or what you listen to, but the CD you have in your hand is one of the best CDs I've ever owned. If you buy that CD, it will be one of the best bargins you've ever had."
2 Comments 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
If anyone out there still doubts Ryan Adams' genius status then they should listen, REALLY listen to Whiskeytown's 'Strangers Almanac'. Adams' star is shining brightly at the moment; critical as well as commercial success are deservedly his, but remembering that Adams was in his early 20's when he wrote these songs it's clear why he was heralded as being 'the next big thing'.
Strangers Almanac is a record that connects with people on so many levels: through sheer power of song, through insightful lyrics that cut to the bone and through a palpable self-belief to transcend any limitations or boundaries.
There are echoes of the Replacements, Springsteen and the best work of Soul Asylum and the Goo Goo Dolls here, yet whiskeytown sound utterly original and of their time. Having played the stuffing out of this album, for me, the emotional core of Strangers Almanac is fittingly in the heart of the album with 'Houses on the Hill', 'Turn Around' and 'Dancing with the Women at the Bar. These three songs are painfully good - this is real raw, honest and heartbreaking music.
Here is a classic case of an album that takes over your senses - little by little, until you feel a powerful compulsion to play this at every opportunity - at home, at work , in the car or whilst walking the street. As with any other Ryan Adams and Caitlin Cary project this is truly indispensible and higly recommended.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Don't know if you feel the same way I do, but I feel a little weird about giving Ryan Adams money. I mean, I've been curious about his music for a while now, but the guy seems to wear a perpetual smug, self-satisfied smirk that says he's more talented and important than you are. Call me crazy but I prefer my rock stars to be either cartoonish megalomaniacs (e.g. W. Axl Rose; Billy Corgan) or serious and humble (e.g. Eddie Vedder, Chris Cornell). That cooler-than-thou act that some upstarts adopt before the ink is even dry on their press clippings is a big turnoff. And yet somehow I found myself ordering a Whiskeytown album on Amazon[.com] earlier this year. I reasoned that at least in his early days, Ryan Adams actually deigned to be part of a band that didn't bear his name - that has to be a good sign right?
So, when Strangers Almanac arrived on my doorstep, I tore open the packaging and put that deal right in my CD player and hit play. Damn, if I wasn't transfixed for the next 52 minutes. It pretty quickly occurred to me that Whiskeytown were a talented outfit with a great deal of potential. I'll admit it - Ryan Adams has an excellent voice and is a talented songwriter. But, it sure helps that he has Caitlin Cary around to harmonize with him on Strangers Almanac. And just because he is obviously talented doesn't mean he hasn't borrowed heavily from the sound of others on this album. I mean, "Turn Around" sounds like Johnny Rzeznik singing over the music from The Cure's "Love Song". Van Morrison is going to want royalties for stealing his entire sound in "Everything I Do". And could "Yesterday's News" sound any more like Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers?
On the other hand, every one of those aforementioned songs is listenable enough. That's a whole lot better than writing ...
Read more ›
1 Comment 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I wasn't born and bred into an alt-country state of mind. In fact, my blood runneth deep with English punk, ska, and SoCo power pop. However, life led me to the south and, for reasons unbeknownst to me, I begin to notice the local musical culture slowly seeping into my system. I fought it as first...until I heard "Turn Around" on the local college station. The gravely "I just woke up and need coffee" vocals and cloudy day musical arrangement struck a chord in me that has yet to leave even though I have moved on and out of the southland. From the down home twang of "Excuse me while I break..." to the simple, sweet words of a lover's longing in "Avenues", this cd has the capacity of scaling one's daily emotional gamut with honesty, humor and depth.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I used to hate country music. The very sound of a steel guitar was enough to make me cringe. In retrospect, I realize that I didn't hate the music - I hated the culture: John Denver's endless series of insipid Christmas specials, Kenny Roger's smugly-trimmed beard, Dolly Parton's miracle-of-modern-technology body, and songs with titles like Hal Smith's "I Got a Stomach Full of Chitlins and a Bellyful of You." Garth Brooks' inexplicable ascent to a level of popularity akin only to Elvis and the Beatles made things worse as country's '90s "revival" had all the integrity of that of '70s "rockers" like Rod Stewart.
Thus, I was fully confident in my belief that country music was the nadir of American music. However, as my musical tastes grew, I kept discovering that a number of my favorite artists (the Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, the Byrds, the Velvet Underground, Neil Young, even Elvis Costello) had recorded music that sounded like country to my untrained ear.
Moreover, their performances sounded great, which meant I either had to accept country as music or fascistly reject it.
I chose the former and now receive confused stares from other college students who pass my room as I blast Patsy Cline and Johnny Cash. Indeed, our culture's elitist disdain for country music is unfortunate, as that prejudice blinds many people to some of the great country music being made today. Dwight Yoakam, Maria McKee, Steve Earle and the Cowboy Junkies have all made music as diverse and inspired as R.E.M., Counting Crow, Oasis or any other "college" band.
Whiskeytown's brilliant new album, "Strange's Almanac" continues this trend.
Read more ›
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Strangers Almanac by Whiskeytown (1997)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Strangers Almanac by Whiskeytown (1997)


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: vinyl pop