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Sunday [Region 2]

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Playback Region 2 :This will not play on most DVD players sold in the U.S., U.S. Territories, Canada, and Bermuda. See other DVD options under “Other Formats & Versions”. Learn more about DVD region specifications here

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Editorial Reviews

France released, PAL/Region 2 DVD: it WILL NOT play on standard US DVD player. You need multi-region PAL/NTSC DVD player to view it in USA/Canada: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 5.1 ), French ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), French ( Subtitles ), WIDESCREEN (1.85:1), SPECIAL FEATURES: Cast/Crew Interview(s), Interactive Menu, Scene Access, Trailer(s), SYNOPSIS: Writer-director Jonathan Nossiter's first feature film is a moody exploration of assaults upon, and shifts in, personal identity. The movie's action all takes place on a Sunday in a poor section of the New York City borough of Queens. Oliver (David Suchet) is a newly homeless middle-aged man who was downsized out of his job as a mid-level functionary at a computer corporation and lost his wife and family because of his employment troubles. Out walking in the borough, Oliver collides with Madeleine Vesey (Lisa Harrow), an out-of-work British actress who is in the process of breaking up with her American husband, Ben (Larry Pine). Madeleine mistakes Oliver for Matthew Delacorta, a famous film director, and Oliver goes along with the mistake, hoping that it will help him to escape his misery. Madeleine hopes that she can make an impression that will land her a film role, so she invites her new friend up to her apartment. When Oliver tells her his life story, she mistakes it for an invented movie plot because Madeleine lives her life in a fantasy world, pretending reality is a film. After the two lost souls have sex without emotion, Ben shows up. He tells Oliver that his recent open-heart surgery wounds were caused by a knife attack from Madeleine. Oliver leaves as the estranged couple argues, but he returns to retrieve his precious winter coat, and he becomes further entangled in the fantasy of a new identity. Sunday won the Grand Jury prize at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival. SCREENED/AWARDED AT: Sundance Film Festival, ...Sunday

Product Details

  • Actors: Jared Harris, Lisa Harrow, Joe Grifasi, Arnold Barkus, Bahman Soltani
  • Directors: Jonathan Nossiter
  • Producers: Sunday
  • Format: Import, PAL, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0), French (Dolby Digital 2.0)
  • Subtitles: French
  • Region: Region 2 (Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    Unrated
    Not Rated
  • Run Time: 87.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000KKUPJG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #829,551 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Kimberly L. Dolce on March 5, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is masterful and precious storytelling about two middle-aged people: a has-been actress and a homeless man whom she's bumped into on the street and mistaken for a movie director. Intrigued, hungry, and lonely, he assumes this director's identity and they spend the day together, deceiving each other in the most loving and heroic ways. This movie must be watched over and over again, listened to carefully, savored. The poetic honesty of the two lovers and the plight of the homeless men in the shelter where the man lives are all interwoven and depicted so fleetingly, so powerfully, that you'll want to stop the tape and rewind it in several places just to get the full impact of the characters and how they influence each other's destinies. The scuzzy realism of the homeless shelter is juxtaposed beautifully with the lyrical speeches of the lovers as they woo each other with their individual stories about life and disappointment and lost youth. But, they haven't lost hope, and that's why I adore this film. If you want to see a small, beautifully crafted film acted by two world-class Shakespearean-trained British actors in the lead roles, I guarantee you won't be disappointed.
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Format: VHS Tape
A good one for those of you looking for an intriguing psychological plot set in a realistic style. Throw in a pinch of the unusual, a generous dose of pathos, a splash of sex, and ride along the edge of this winner.
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By A Customer on January 19, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
This film is marvelous! A triumph in its depiction of loneliness and despair. If you're tired of car crashes and stupid/grossed out comedies, see this film. It is extremely powerful.
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Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
The movie "SUNDAY." An amazing piece of recognition. Recognition of need and warmth counterpoised against the routine pretense of recognition which accompanied one's life in the past.
The woman has lived a long time with failure, with the illusion of promise which the future might bring. A new man, renewal of a career, that relationship which defies definition, but which can weave a magical web of mystery around the usual day to day events of life. The woman's question: I am still beautiful, I can act and speak and make audiences cry. Why am I left behind then, with my image worshipped still, at an altar which does not contain me?
The man has not lived so long with failure, is still enduring the shock of it, in jagged shots of vision-as a camera, flashing past sights no one ever wanted to see; persistent glimpses which go in and out of focus as in a dream, a nightmare-where eyeglasses produce a truth which eyes do not wish to see. His escape from truth, he can remove the eyeglasses and see nothing. Life has become a pile-up of trash, in rain spattered streets still blotched with late winter's snow. In spite of looking, your eyes refuse to grasp it, to integrate scene after scene with reason or meaning.
I watch the screen in amazement. I wonder how a story will emerge from the bad weather, bad views, bad tasting dark and light which tell the story of a fractured and blighted society. The society which we don't see or hear or care to see. Yet this bitter, broken place contains the music and the vital energy of all races, all nationalities. This energy, though misdirected at times, can still break through the clutter to beauty, unbelievably.
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Format: DVD
The premier extra on this DVD is the interview that the film's director, Jonathan Nossiter, conducts with one of the great American directors, Arthur Penn, called "Searching for Arthur". Nossiter himself is a strange combination of self-conscious and intellectually smug, but when Penn is allowed to speak, it's fascinating.

The film itself, Sunday, in spite of the director's personality that oozes through during the interview with Penn, is actually very good. David Suchet plays Oliver, a middle class IBM manager who's been thrown out of his job, now living in a shelter. By chance, he meets Madeleine, a British actress living in New York, whose marriage is crumbling and who appears to be having a hard time finding work. The two of them connect by a mutual understanding of their sorrowful plights using the clever mechanism of telling each other "made up" stories that reflect their real thoughts and feelings about each other. This is compounded by Madeleine's initially mistaking Oliver for a film director, Matthew Delacorta, and then continuing through with this charade, even though she knows it's not true.

One of the plot devices that gives this film a tremendous boost is the intercutting between scenes of Oliver and Madeleine together with scenese depicting life in the homeless shelter where Oliver has come to stay. The men in the shelter--one of whom is played by an actual homeless man, Jimmy Broadway, with a great theatrical presence--are by turns vindictive, lost, petty, and hopeful. Jared Harris in particular is excellent as Ray, one of the homeless men.

Nossiter does not let the viewer off easy with a stereotypical development of the relationship between Oliver and Madeleine.
Read more ›
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By Cowpoke on August 25, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
What attracted me to Sunday was the pairing of David Suchet (Poirot) & Lisa Harrow (a lady from NZ in several roles from UK TV to international cinema) in a film as opposed to TV.
Then it was selected by Redford's Festival Sundance. It is serious drama, set in NY,and is gripping viewing.
I will view it a second time as it takes time to absorb.This is a film for those prepared to listen & absorb, rare today as it lacks cops, bombs & the seemingly popular violence on screen. Be brave, tackle it!
Regards
David Baxter.
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